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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions are listed by the College/School/Center offering the course.

Reminder:  To enroll in an upper division general education course, students must have completed at least one lower division course clustering with the upper division course.  See AUA General Education Requirements.

 

 

 

Manoogian Simone College of Business and Economics (CBE)

 

BUS050 Pre-term Quantitative Methods (Credits: 0)

This intensive workshop for incoming students is designed to refresh the basic quantitative tools essential for the successful completion of the program. The course content provides the student with a number of mathematical and statistical tools frequently used in business analysis, marketing research, operations management and finance. Topics include: linear and exponential growth, data analysis and description statistics (mean, median, mode, range, variance, deviation), basic concepts of probability, hypothesis testing, introduction to linear regression, basics of linear programming, compound interest, discounting and calculation of Net Present Value. Topics may change according to the needs of the participating students.  The main software used is Microsoft Excel. The course can be waived by placement test.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS101 Introduction to Business (Credits: 3)

Introduction to Business is a required course for first-year BAB majors. This course addresses the basic functions and activities of business both individually and collectively in the generation of jobs, the production and dissemination of needed goods, the pursuit of innovation, the creation of social and personal assets, and the satisfaction of individual and societal needs and wants. The course also examines ways that individuals can responsibly manage their own financial health and welfare as part of the larger economic system. Students will be encouraged to relate the material covered to their own life experiences and to critical national and international challenges. Home tasks will include reading, writing reports on important current issues that relate to the subject matter, and reflections on personal observations and analyses.

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BUS105 Foundations of Management (Credits: 3)

The course provides a comprehensive introduction to principles of management.  Through the course, students will become familiar with various organizational structures and functions and will develop the analytical tools to determine how organizational resources (money, time, and personnel) can be most effectively managed.  The course will cover the following topics: organizational culture, individual and group behavior, leadership, motivation, teamwork, communication, and measures of organizational effectiveness.   Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and analysis of case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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BUS109 Business Mathematics (Credits: 3)

This course treats standard one-variable calculus with an emphasis on business and economics applications, as well as a short introduction to multivariable calculus. It is designed for business students, who want a brief course in Calculus. Calculus topics include the derivative, methods of finding derivatives, business applications of derivatives, the integral, methods of integration, business applications of integration, and the calculus of the exponential and logarithmic functions. Multivariable calculus topics include partial derivatives and finding local extrema. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and solve in-class and homework problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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BUS110 Applied Statistics (Credits: 3)

This course introduces the necessary core quantitative methods that will be needed in future offerings as part of the BA in Business program.  Statistical software and the use of spreadsheets are integrated throughout so that students better comprehend the importance of using modern technological tools for effective model building and decision making. The course will make use of a data oriented approach in exposing students to basic statistical methods, their conceptual underpinning, such as variability and uncertainty, and their use in the real world. Topics include data collection, descriptive statistics, elementary probability rules and distributions, sampling distributions, and basic inference.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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BUS112 Social, Legal & Ethical Environment of Business (Credits: 3)

This course explores the basic social, legal and ethical environment of business by examining 1) the role of business in society, 2) the interactions between businesses as well as between businesses and governments, 3) basic legal frameworks for businesses, and 4) ethical standards in business, and finally 5) corporate responsibility.  Students will apply appropriate social, legal, and ethical principles, frameworks and standards to analyze modern business scenarios. .   Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies.  Home tasks include reading, the writing of papers, and case study analysis.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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BUS145 Introduction to Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the terminology, procedures and principles of financial accounting and reporting. Students will develop the necessary skills to 1) analyze routine business transactions and accounting information, 2) measure assets, liabilities, equities, and income, and 3) understand, analyze, and develop financial statements and other forms of financial reporting and communication..  Weekly home tasks will require students to complete weekly reading assignments and apply accounting procedures and principles in order to analyze routine business transactions and accounting information. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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BUS146 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the terminology, procedures and principles of financial accounting and reporting. Students will develop the necessary skills to 1) analyze routine business transactions and accounting information, 2) measure assets, liabilities, equities, and income, and 3) understand, analyze, and develop financial statements and other forms of financial reporting and communication..  Weekly home tasks will require students to complete weekly reading assignments and apply accounting procedures and principles in order to analyze routine business transactions and accounting information. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS160 Principles of Marketing (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to the field of marketing and marketing management.  Students learn to analyze, plan, and implement marketing strategies in order to achieve the objectives of a range of organizations. Students analyze cases that focus on key marketing tasks: marketing research, consumer behavior, segmentation and targeting, product and brand management, sales forecasting, pricing, marketing channels, and promotion and advertising strategies. Students will also have the opportunity to work in teams to develop and present an innovative marketing plan for a business of their choice.  Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and case study analysis as well as weekly progress on team marketing plan. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time per week including discussions.

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Prerequisite:

 

BUS177 Business Communications (Credits: 3)

This course provides an intensive introduction to the communication process, the concepts and principles of internal and external business communications, as well as develops an understanding of public relations in a business context. The course also teaches persuasive writing, public speaking, and collaborative skills necessary for future business courses, internships, and professional positions. The course involves lectures, presentations, research, group projects, discussions with active participation and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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BUS201 Business Negotiations (Credits: 3)

This course addresses conflict resolution techniques as well as a broad range of negotiation challenges and strategies. Students will learn about the theory and application of effective negotiation.  Through this course, students will be able to analyze individual, group, and organizational behavior and develop techniques to mediate and resolve conflict. Home tasks include reading and case study analysis.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS105

 

BUS207 Human Resources Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of contemporary issues in HRM exploring HR managers’ role in overseeing employee career development cycle from entry to exit. Topics include but are not limited to recruitment, selection and induction, training and development, compensation and benefits, performance management and appraisal systems.  Class format includes lectures followed by peer discussions progressing to student presentations and final projects. Instructor-led discussion, home assignments and case study analysis.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS105

 

BUS210 Introduction to International Business Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines the management of international corporations in today’s global political and economic environment. Topics include management challenges faced by multinational corporations, the economics of trade, money and investment in the world economy, policies and behavior of governments and international organizations, and current issues regarding emerging economies and shifts in the political economy of global markets. Home tasks will include reading assignments, research, and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

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BUS211 Introduction to Innovation & Entrepreneurship (Credits: 3)

The course examines the sources of motivation for entrepreneurship and innovation, and the skills, knowledge, and abilities of entrepreneurs and the innovators.  Students will become familiar with the processes involved in starting a new venture or transforming an existing business.  Integrating their business knowledge from previous coursework, students will generate innovative business ideas and develop implementable business plans.  The course will explore the following topics: opportunity identification, feasibility of ideas, market analysis, legal and tax considerations, ownership options, and management and financing challenges and requirements.  Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, analysis of case studies, and development of business plan. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS105 AND BUS145 AND BUS160

 

BUS226 Money, Banking & Financial Institutions (Credits: 3)

This course examines modern theory of corporate finance and financial institutions. Topics covered include, monetary policy, financial markets, financial intermediation and the role of banks and other financial institutions, regulation of financial markets, incomplete financial contracting, financial intermediation, initial public offerings, market for corporate control and security design. Students will work collaboratively in groups to analyze financial institutions and apply relevant theories and frameworks to real-world business problems.  Students will present their findings to their peers and business professionals. Home tasks will include reading, research, and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121 AND ECON122 AND BUS145 AND BUS146 AND BUS230

 

BUS227 International Monetary Relations (Credits: 3)

This course explores international macroeconomic relationships. Topics include national income, accounting, and balance of payments; foreign exchange rates and exchange rate markets; money, interest rates, and exchange rate determination; prices, exchange rates, and output in the short run; international monetary arrangements; fixed versus flexible exchange rates; optimal currency areas; and international capital flows. The course relates basic economic theory to current international problems, using a policy-oriented approach. Home tasks include research, reading, problem sets, and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121

 

BUS230 Introduction to Finance (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to the principles of finance and their application to financial decision making in a variety of business enterprises. The course will examine the following topics: introduction on financial markets and institutions; time value of money; financial instruments and their valuation: financial analysis and the problems of financial forecasting; capital budgeting, cost of capital, introduction to risk and return; comparing financial objectives of manager and investor; and long term financing. Home tasks may include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145 AND BUS110 AND BUS109 OR CS100

 

BUS232 Principles of Corporate Finance (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon topics covered in BUS 230 Introduction to Finance  and provides an overall introduction to the theory, methods, and concerns of corporate finance.  Topics include time value of money and capital budgeting, risk and return, dividend policy decisions, security market efficiency, and optimal capital structure.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS230

 

BUS233 Public Finance (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the role of the government in the economy. The aim is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention in the economy, analyzing the benefits of possible government policies, and the response of economic agents to the government’s actions. The course covers taxes on capital, savings and labor; corporate taxation, welfare capitalism, externalities and public goods, behavioral public finance, political economy. Special coverage of current policy issues such as social security reform, income tax reform, and budget deficits. Class format includes lectures instructor-led discussion, assignments, readings and projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121 AND ECON122 AND ECON221

 

BUS234 Market Structure and Strategy (Credits: 3)

This course studies decisions of firms in imperfectly competitive environments. The topics include strategic decision making in static and dynamic contexts on pricing, capacity, product differentiation, advertising and marketing, research and development, and size of investment. The course applies micro- and game-theoretic approaches. Class format includes lectures instructor-led discussion, assignments, reading and projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121 AND ECON122 AND ECON221

 

BUS239 Special Topics in Finance (Credits: 3)

This course explores topics in finance with emphasis on current problems and research. Topics to be announced prior to course registration. The course will enable students to develop skills/understanding of advanced topics on an individual basis. Students will develop deeper understanding of a specific finance topic related to the student’s academic interest.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS230

 

BUS245 Intermediate Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon concepts covered in BUS 145 Introduction to Financial Accounting. This course will review accounting principles and examine the components of the asset side of the balance sheet: cash, accounts receivable, inventory, marketable securities, equity investments, PPE, and intangibles.   Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and problem sets. Home tasks will require students to apply complex accounting procedures and principles and analyze business transactions. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS247 Intermediate Managerial Accounting (Credits: 3)

Building upon topics covered in BUS 146 Introduction to Managerial Accounting, this course explores alternative methods of accounting information for managerial decision making.  Students will analyze the complex relationships between accounting techniques and other organizational activities including strategy, employee motivation, and the use of accounting information to develop solutions for managerial challenges.  Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS146

 

BUS248 Introduction to Financial Statement Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course examines financial reporting in the context of decision-making and contracting. Students will extract, interpret, and analyze financial statements with emphasis on identifying various objectives and incentives. Students will apply learned techniques to case studies and real-world business scenarios.  Home tasks will include case study analysis and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS250 Tax Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce students to the Armenian tax code and the different categories of taxes applicable to individuals and companies, domestic and foreign, including profit tax, income tax, VAT, social security, property, land and other excise taxes. In addition to learning about the accounting and tax reporting requirements, students will also study elementary tax planning, taxation of basic import/export transactions including customs, and international taxation under double tax and foreign investment treaties.  Home tasks will include problem sets, statutory interpretation and application, and review of tax authority guidance and administrative cases.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS253 Introduction to Auditing (Credits: 3)

This course examines the changing role of the auditor, the organization of the accounting profession, and the influences of oversight.  Topics include auditing and reporting standards,audit planning and documentation, materiality and risk, internal control, statistical tools,legal liability, and professional ethics. Students will utilize journal articles and case studies to discuss and analyze theory. Home tasks include reading, case study analysis and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS254 Intermediate Auditing (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon topics introduced in BUS253,Introduction to Auditing, and focuses on auditing financial reports, internal controls, and Electronic Data Processing (EDP) systems. Topics include the personnel and payroll system, inventory, capital acquisition cycle, selected balance sheet and income statement accounts, audit reports, assurances and other services, professional ethics, and legal responsibilities.  Also discussed will be the value value of internal auditing to a company’s strategy. Home tasks include reading, case study analysis and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS253

 

BUS257 International Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course examines how generally accepted accounting principles and reporting practices have been developed and applied globally. Topics include inflation accounting and foreign currency translation, accounting for hedging transaction losses, management control in the foreign environment, analysis of foreign financial statements, transfer pricing and international taxation. Students will utilize case studies to compare practices and examine theory. Home tasks include research, case study analysis, and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145 AND ECON228

 

BUS261 Sales Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines through case study analysis the strategic and tactical aspects of sales management with emphasis on strategies for managing a sales force. Business-to-business as well as business-to-consumer relationships will be covered. Students will engage in individual presentations as well as group projects. Topics include salesperson effectiveness, deployment, motivation, organizational design, compensation, and evaluation.   Home tasks will include reading, research, case study analysis, and presentation preparation. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS160

 

BUS262 Consumer Behavior (Credits: 3)

This course examines the factors influencing consumer choices in the market place. Topics include consumer knowledge, rationality, judgment biases, risk-taking, dealing with conflicting values, and prospect theory.   Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies.  Home tasks include reading, research, and case studies. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS160

 

BUS263 Brand Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines the importance of building a brand as well as the ingredients for solid brand management. Topics include understanding brands, designing brand, and measuring brand usage.  Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies and present findings. Home tasks include research and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS112 AND BUS160

 

BUS265 International Marketing (Credits: 3)

This course examines the economic, cultural, social, political, legal, and strategic influences on international marketing. Topics include product pricing, distribution, strategies and policies, market selection, and market research.  Home tasks include reading, research, and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS160

 

BUS266 Advertising Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines the theories, strategies, principles and practices of effective advertising management.  Students will utilize theory and market research to analyze the design and management of advertising. Topics include consumer segmentation, target selection, consumer motivation and insight, and developing communications strategies.   Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies. Home tasks include research and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS112 AND BUS160

 

BUS271 Tourism and Hospitality (Credits: 3)

This course will examine the scope of the hospitality and tourism industries and how they work together, whilst learning key business skills including marketing, operations management and human resources. The course will address hospitality management knowledge and practices. It will review aspects from marketing to engineering of lodging and food service industries. Home tasks will include industry analysis, reading assignments and case study write-ups. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS112 AND BUS160

 

BUS275 Market Research (Credits: 3)

This course examines the role of market research in solving marketing problems.  Topics include problem formulation, research design, alternative methods of data collection, sampling, and data analysis techniques. Students will work individually and in groups to engage in market research. Home tasks include research, case study analysis, and problem sets.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS110 AND BUS112 AND BUS160

 

BUS276 Integrated Marketing Communication (Credits: 3)

This course explores the integrated approach to marketing products and services and the major marketing communication decisions made by brand managers. Topics include mass media advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct response marketing and packaging. Students will work individually and in groups on various marketing projects throughout the semester. Home tasks include research and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS112 AND BUS160 AND BUS275

 

BUS278 Internet Marketing (Credits: 3)

This course will build upon BA 160 Principles of Marketing and investigate the opportunities and challenges presented by the continuing development of Internet Technology.  Topics include e-business strategy, online consumer behavior, strategy alternatives, advertising, promotions, and public relations. Lectures and workshops will explore the use of the internet in market research and marketing communication between businesses and consumers as well as between businesses. Home tasks will include research and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS160

 

BUS279 Special Topics in Marketing (Credits: 3)

This course explores topics in business communication with emphasis on current problems and research. Topics to be announced prior to course registration.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS105 AND BUS160

 

BUS280 Operations Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the role, responsibilities, and skill sets of operations managers.  Through this course, students will learn how operations managers can effectively and efficiently transform human, physical, financial, and technical resources into goods and services.  Students will also learn how to analyze, run and improve business operations across a range of industries. The course emphasizes operation-level decision-making, involving both process-design and resource decisions. Students are required to complete a final project in which they assess the effectiveness of management decisions and provide recommendations to a real world business challenge based upon an extensive analysis of both qualitative and quantitative data. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time per week

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS105 AND BUS110 AND BUS109 OR CS100

 

BUS281 Management Information Systems (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to information technologies as they influence the structure, processes, and strategies of organizations and economies, and as they influence the roles and techniques of management. Through this course, students will examine the role of information systems in solving business-related problems such as new product development, innovation, and competitive performance. Topics include computer-based information systems; managerial use, acquisition, and control of information systems and technology; ethical use of information; and emerging information technologies. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS230

 

BUS285 Strategic Management (Credits: 3)

This course brings together the skills and disciplinary understanding gained in previous courses, with a focus on managerial decisions and actions that determines the long-term performance of a company. Topics include: environmental scanning (both external and internal), strategy formulation (strategic or long-range planning), strategy implementation, and evaluation and control. The study of strategic management, therefore, emphasizes the monitoring and evaluating of external opportunities and threats in light of a corporation’s strengths and weaknesses.BREAK BREAKStudents will develop skillsets for understanding and analyzing strategic issues. Students will examine and analyze cases studies covering a broad range of business situations as well as other internal and external factors affecting and driving managerial decision-making. Students will work both individually and in groups, to present cases, and develop a foreign market-entry strategy project for a virtual company they will develop themselves. There are three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS105 AND BUS112 AND ECON121

 

BUS286 Accounting Information Systems (Credits: 3)

This course examines accounting information systems, including their design, control, and use. Through this course, students will develop their abilities to understand the processing of accounting data through computerized systems and the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of the data processed by these systems. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS287 Start-Up Management (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the typical stages that successful start-up companies go through, tailored to the Armenian business reality. Students will apply appropriate managerial and entrepreneurial principles and frameworks to analyze innovative business ideas. Guest speakers from prominent Armenian start-up companies will share their experience on managing the initial phase of launching and developing a company, and on real-life “underwater stones” that they had to cope with. A major component will be a group project to identify “market gaps” that could be filled in by new product/service offerings, and to prepare a substantiating written report and a PPT presentation to support the case using analytical tools and techniques included in class materials. Classroom discussion and homework assignments will be based on case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS101 AND BUS211

 

BUS288 Business Analytics (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce the main concepts in business analytics, which will allow achieving fluency in four paradigms that account for most business decisions: marketing, operations, human resources and financial analytics. Students will learn how to explore and visualize the data and develop an analytic mindset that will help you make strategic decisions based on data. Students also explore the common pitfalls in interpreting statistical arguments, especially those associated with big data. Collectively, this course will help students internalize a core set of practical and effective methods and concepts, and apply them to solve some real world problems. In the final Project, students will apply their skills to interpret a real-world data set and make appropriate business strategy recommendations. In addition to the readings, there are 5 graded problem sets and ungraded review problem sets at the beginning and end of the course. The problem sets have both analytical and computational exercise components. The statistical analysis will be conducted using IBM SPSS Statistics, IBM SPSS Modeler and MS Excel. Three hour instructor led class-time weekly.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS100 OR BUS109 AND BUS110 OR CS108 OR CS107 OR IESM106

 

BUS290 Independent Study (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to permit students to design and complete a research project or other academic or professional approved activity under the supervision of an instructor for credit. The course will address a special area of interest of the student and instructor outside the standard offerings of the program and have interdisciplinary or research components. The course must include a syllabus (or study plan) and evidence of learning equivalent to respective credits. Independent study courses are subject to approval of instructor and Program Chair.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS292 Internship (Credits: 3)

The Business Internship provides students with practical experience in professional settings, enabling students to apply the skills learned throughout the program.   Placements must be approved by the Department Head. Approval will depend on both the suitability of the placement and the specific tasks and projects that the placement will entail. All internships require the writing of a report summarizing the internship experience.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS295 Research Methods (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to provide students with with the necessary knowledge and skills on different types of quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods approaches. Students will advance their understanding of research through critical exploration of research language, ethics, elements of the research process and challenges. Students will gain an understanding of relevant techniques and elements of undertaking a research inquiry and providing insights to solving a relevant problem. The course will cover the following topics: defining research questions, setting research objectives, doing systematic literature review, elaborating study design, doing secondary and primary data collection and mastering such instruments, doing sampling and data analysis; and effective reporting and communicating results. Coursework includes reading, assignments, research proposal elaboration, exams.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS230 AND BUS160 AND BUS112 AND BUS105 AND ECON121 AND ECON122

 

BUS299 Capstone (Credits: 3)

As the culminating experience for the BA in Business degree, the Capstone course bridges theory and skills introduced in coursework with business practices and real world situations.  The capstone allows students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in and across the main functional areas of business; apply relevant theoretical frameworks and tools from these areas to real business situations; perform business tasks with the interpersonal skills and professional demeanor demanded in business settings; produce and deliver written and oral presentations, and communicate with specialists and non-specialists using appropriate media and technology. Under faculty supervision, tasks will include completion of assignments and progress reports on capstone projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS160 AND BUS230 AND BUS105

 

BUS300 Introduction to Competitive Strategy (Credits: 2)

This course is intended to develop students’ ability to think strategically about business problems. At the same time it serves as an introduction to the use of the case method. The course is a systematic examination of models and techniques used to analyze a competitive situation within an industry from a strategic perspective. It examines the roles of key players in competitive situations and the fundamentals of analytical and factoriented strategic reasoning. Examples of applied competitive and industry analysis are emphasized. The course examines the different stages involved in making and implementing strategic decisions,  defining the problem(s), establishing the criteria (both quantitative and qualitative), designing alternative solutions, and making a decision based on objective criteria and the ease of successful implementation of the solution chosen.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS301 Effective Communications (Credits: 2)

This course prepares students to meet the challenge of professional oral communications. Through prepared and impromptu speeches, peer coaching, and lectures, it provides students with the opportunity to develop the necessary skills for effective public speaking; skills that will make them articulate, confident, organized, competent and persuasive speakers. The course exposes students to a variety of communication and presentation styles and modes, helps students develop critical listening skills, and improve their abilities to give, receive, and apply feedback.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS305 Managing People and Organizations (Credits: 3)

This course provides an intensive overview of the major concepts in organizational behavior and issues facing contemporary managers. The course approaches management as the processes and techniques used to reach organization goals by working with and through people and other resources. These processes include a study of individual differences,  group behavior,  organizational culture,  job design and job satisfaction,  motivation,  decisionmaking,  power and leadership,  and communication. The course makes use of theories that transcend the workplace, such as the psychology of individual and group behavior. The course examines how people influence organizational events and how events within the organization influence people’s behavior. The course uses a combination of conceptual and experiential approaches, including case analyses, videos, simulations, group exercises and class discussions.

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Prerequisite:

 

BUS306 Managerial Negotiations (Credits: 2)

This course introduces students to negotiation skills and practices and improves their abilities to diagnose conflict situations. It provides a conceptual framework to diagnose problems and promote agreements, both outside and inside an organization. Upon completion of this course, students will have a sound understanding of using negotiation and conflict resolution skills in a variety of settings. Course format involves simulated negotiation and experiential exercises, case analysis, discussion, and lecture.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS305

 

BUS307 Human Resource Management (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to a general overview of personnel policies and best practices in organizations. The course will focus on human resources from the perspective of the human resource professional. Specific topics to be covered include staffing, training and development, performance evaluation, compensation, employee discipline, work safety/health, and labor/management relations to name a few. This course will rely heavily on case analysis, along with didactic lectures, group discussions, and presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS305

 

BUS308 Career Development and Strategies (Credits: 1)

Drawing upon human resources management and organizational studies and using case studies, this course examines how career paths and systems operate within an organization given the need for coherence between them and the strategy of the organization. The course also introduces students to several skills, tools and techniques required for effective career planning and advancement. The course provides students with the opportunity to practice and improve themselves in the following areas: identifying career goals and paths,  dealing with gaps in their critical career and professional skills,  professional networking and liaising. Students also examine the challenges and opportunities associated with the application of knowledge and skills learned in the program to their current/future work environments.

Corequisite: BUS305

Prerequisite:

 

BUS309 Special Topics in Management (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in management. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other management courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region. The primary method of instruction will be to use didactic lectures, case analysis and group presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS305

 

BUS310 International Business Management (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to fundamental as well as current major topics in international business by focusing on the economic, cultural, social, political and organizational issues raised by the international operations of the firm. The course explores the firm’s motivations for international expansion, its choices of entering foreign markets, and examines the key components involved in operating facilities, strategic positioning and organizational structure in foreign markets. The course also covers the fundamental elements of cross-cultural management and working in an international context by examining the impact of cultural differences in key management activities. The course places a special emphasis on exploring the challenges and opportunities facing Armenian firms in their expansion into the Russian, European and other markets as well as the strategic and operational challenges and opportunities facing multinational firms in the South Caucasus and in the Armenian market, in particular.

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Prerequisite:

 

BUS311 Entrepreneurship (Credits: 3)

The course is designed to explore the complexities of creating and sustaining an entrepreneurial venture. Concentration is on the impact of innovative behavior and its implication to decision-making. The primary focus of the course is on the behaviors involved in forming new enterprises: recognizing and evaluating opportunities; developing a network of support; building an organization; acquiring resources; identifying customers; estimating demand; selling, writing and presenting a business plan; and exploring the ethical issues entrepreneurs face. The course format includes case studies and discussion, in-class exercises, readings, and guest speakers.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS312 Legal Environment of Business (Credits: 2)

This course provides students with a basic understanding of how legal, regulatory and political processes affect business strategy and decision making. Readings and lectures provide students with a basic background in the theoretical foundations and practical workings of the two main legal systems of the world, how they evolved and presently work. The course includes a survey of basic rules of criminal law, intentional torts, and negligence; the rules affecting the making and performance of contracts; general contract law as well as specific rules that exist in the sale of goods and merchandise, and in the purchase, ownership and sale of real property; and the choices available for dispute resolution, including mediation, arbitration, and trial at court.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS313 Corporate Ethics and Responsibility (Credits: 2)

This course examines contemporary issues in ethical behavior in organizations. Drawing from the fields of philosophy, law, ethics, business and society, and management, the course explores decision dilemmas that require multidisciplinary thinking as it pertains to corporate ethics and responsibility in today’s global marketplace. Emphasis is to practice decision principles that allow students to take into account their own moral principles in making business decisions. This course is taught drawing heavily on the case method along with didactic lectures, group discussions, and group presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS305

 

BUS314 Leading Organizational Change (Credits: 3)

This course provides students with a broad understanding of the theoretical and operational underpinnings of management of change and corporate renewal in four domains: developing a strategic vision, designing new structures and processes, aligning individual motivation with organizational culture, and gaining support for the implementation of change. The course examines the impact of power and influence on decision-making, the politics of change, participative change approaches, reengineering, and organizational adaptation. The course relies heavily on case analysis, along with didactic lectures, group discussions, and presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS315 International Strategic Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate concepts from prior functional courses through the development and implementation of a business strategy. The course format involves lectures, class discussion, comprehensive case studies and an intensive business strategy simulation. The latter requires student teams to formulate and implement strategy for a simulated firm within a highly competitive industry. The course is designed to deepen students understanding of strategy formulation, competitive advantage, rivalry and competition, negotiation, financial control, operational excellence, and team building.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS300 AND BUS330 AND BUS345 AND BUS346 AND BUS360 AND BUS380

 

BUS316 Organizational Leadership (Credits: 3)

This course will focus on an overview of the fundamental concepts of leadership in today’s global marketplace. The course will serve as an introduction to tools for topics such as strategic thinking, leading change and performance, critical thinking, leading teams and groups, influencing others, conflict resolution and Emotional Intelligence to name a few. The method of instruction for this course will combine didactic lectures, self-assessments, case analysis and group interactions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS305

 

BUS318 Corporate Strategy (Credits: 3)

The main purpose of the course is to learn skills as a chief strategist of a firm with global and diverse outlook. The course will teach how a good strategist can size up the external environment of a firm in its entirety. Also, the course will concentrate on a firm’s internal activities and assets aimed at attaining a competitive advantage in an external environment.  The third distinctive dimension of the course is to learn how to sustain the advantage of a company over time in the face of competitive dynamics. Students’ evaluations include class participation, group presentation and the final exam.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS300

 

BUS319 Special Topics in Leadership (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of contemporary issues in organizational leadership. It is customized for students aspiring to acquire the necessary leadership skills and attributes to successfully compete in leadership roles in today’s global marketplace. Emphasis will be on helping each student become an ethical, effective, and empowered leader while inspiring excellence. The primary teaching method for this course will be case analysis, leadership training and experiential exercises.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS320 Data Analysis for Business Decisions (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to statistical methods and techniques as tools for management decision-making. Specific topics to be covered include: sampling and sampling distributions, parametric and non-parametric statistical inference methods, simple and multiple regression, and forecasting techniques as applied to business and management problems.  Students will gain the ability to build forecasting models using a variety of techniques, employing mathematical and statistical models including regression techniques, time series analysis, and business and economic indicators for forecasting. Students will also learn to use various computer software including Excel, SPSS and Access.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS321 Data Mining for Business (Credits: 3)

We will examine how data analysis technologies can be used to improve decision making. We will study the fundamental principles and techniques of data mining, and we analyze real-world examples and cases to place data-mining techniques in context and to develop data-analytic thinking. We will work “hands-on” with data mining software. As an applied course, the emphasis will be less on the inner working of each method and more on when and how to use each technique and how to interpret results. Students will be graded based on project presentations, homework assignments, midterm and end-term exams. There are three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS320

 

BUS322 Managerial Economics (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the economic decisions made by managers of business firms, and the structures of various market environments within which these decisions are made. The course reviews the application of fundamental concepts, such as opportunity costs, transaction costs and market power as they apply to managerial and individual decisionmaking.  In addition, the course covers utility analysis,  demand, supply, and cost functions,  and applies these models to pricing and vertical integration issues.  An introduction to the economics of information and uncertainty is included.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS324 Business Analytics (Credits: 2)

This is a course on the use of decision models for business analytics. Its main topics include constrained optimization and decision making under uncertainty. The emphasis is on models that are widely used in diverse industries and functional areas, including operations, finance, accounting, and marketing. The course has a twofold purpose. First, it seeks to introduce you to simple models and ideas that provide useful (and often surprising) qualitative insights about a large spectrum of managerial problems. Second, it aims to give you a feeling for the kinds of problems that can be tackled quantitatively, the methods and software available for doing so, and some of the issues involved in gathering the relevant data. Whether or not students explicitly use these decision models in the future, the course will have impact on the way they think about available data and how it can be used to provide more value in management decisions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS327 Microfoundations of Competitiveness (Credits: 3)

The course explores the determinants of national and regional competitiveness building from the perspective of firms, clusters, sub-national units, nations, and groups of neighboring countries.  It focuses on the sources of national or regional productivity, which are rooted in the strategies and operating practices of locally based firms, the vitality of clusters, and the quality of the business environment in which competition takes place.  Through lectures, class discussions and group projects, students will analyze competitiveness at multiple levels – nations, sub-national units and neighboring countries.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS322 AND BUS300

 

BUS328 Economic Policy for Development and Competitiveness (Credits: 2)

The course combines a macroeconomic view of development and competitiveness and a microeconomic or business-level view. The macroeconomic analysis provides a contextual background for the discussions on the evaluation of business opportunities. Particularly, the course focuses on public policy as a basic element for ensuring national and industry-level competitiveness. The course draws on economic development theory and refers to specific cases, as well as business cases to examine the challenges of equitable economic growth; reviews the role of technology, innovation, public-private partnerships, and entrepreneurship in promoting sustainable economic development; and analyzes public policies affecting poverty and inequality. A substantial part of the analysis is conducted in the Armenian economy context.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS322

 

BUS329 Special Topics in Economics (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in Economics. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other Economics courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS330 Financial Management (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the firm’s goal to maximize shareholder value. Topics include risk, return and pricing of financial assets, time value of money, investment decisions, capital markets, and cost of capital and corporate financing decisions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS331 Data, Analysis and Decisions (Credits: 3)

This course reviews a range of econometric methods that can be used for supporting business and management. Starting with an introduction to  business and management decisions that need data analysis, the course will proceed to advanced econometric methods for addressing specific problems  stemming either from the nature of the data generation process or from the relationships being examined. The course will develop econometric skills in several ways. First, the course will review numerous econometric models and in each case discuss the type of problems the model is suited for, how to test hypotheses, and the shortcomings of various models. Second, students will be asked to prepare 2 presentations that will introduce a specific problem that a decision maker (manager) is facing (can face) and provide recommendations based on available data and econometric analysis. Third, to assist in the development of data management, modeling, analysis, and interpretative skills, students will use Stata to analyze data. Students will be graded based on group and individual presentations, midterm exam, final report, and class participation. This is a 3 unit elective course, with three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON310 OR BUS320

 

BUS332 Corporate Finance (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon BUS330 by examining advanced topics in corporate finance including dividend policy, mergers & acquisitions, cost of capital, capital budgeting and financial decision-making.  Course concepts are integrated into the standard theories of risk and return, valuation of assets, the role of financial markets, and market structure.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS333 Advanced Corporate Finance (Credits: 2)

This course builds upon BUS 332 by delving deeper into the theory behind capital budgeting and valuation theory to examine new techniques for making these decisions, such as using option pricing models to make a capital budgeting decision, instead of the traditional net present value. The course covers mergers, leveraged buy-outs, divestitures and financial distress, along with the financial management of non-profit businesses. Additionally, the course examines in some detail the capital structure decision in terms of hybrid financing, and the most current instruments available for long funding of a corporation.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS332

 

BUS334 Commercial Banking (Credits: 2)

This course involves the study of modern commercial bank management, reasons for regulation; economics of banking, risk management including credit and interest rate risk, standards of liquidity, capital and solvency and recent changes in the modern commercial bank environment.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS332

 

BUS335 Banking Operations and Simulations (Credits: 3)

This course offers students a chance to take the theoretical underpinnings of commercial bank management and macroeconomics and apply it directly to operating a bank in a simulated environment. The Stanford Bank Computer Simulation will be enlisted to afford students an opportunity to simulate the managing of a large, metropolitan bank. Based on the economic data provided, students will need to forecast the direction of interest rates, set rates for loans and deposits, set fees for services, open or close branches, allocate the time of the bank’s officers, and make other equally critical, logistical decisions that are in fact made every day by professional bank practitioners. The course will probe in great detail how bank profitability and value are impacted by operational decisions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS332

 

BUS336 Management of Financial Institutions (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the study of financial policies and practices of commercial banks, savings and loan associations, pension funds, insurance companies, and other major financial institutions. It will review the current major problems facing senior managers in these financial institutions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS337 Risk Management (Credits: 2)

This course provides a broad-based survey of the fundamental risks faced by financial institutions and other firms. These include interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk, off-balance sheet risk, technology and operational risk, foreign exchange risk, energy risk, country of sovereign risk, liquidity risk, insolvency risk, model risk, and a myriad of others. Effective management of these risks is central to the performance of any firm. The course explores the various techniques used to identify risk, measure risk, and manage risk. The knowledge gained in basic finance, portfolio management, derivatives, business management, economics, and statistics will be made practical.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS332

 

BUS338 Investment Analysis and Management (Credits: 3)

This course will address theory and practice of investment analysis. Topics include organization of security markets, legal and institutional environment, financial intermediation, security classification and general principles of asset valuation with application to specific securities.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS339 Special Topics in Finance (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in Finance. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other Finance courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS340 International Financial Management (Credits: 2)

This course approaches financial management within an international context. Topics include international monetary system and financial markets, management of foreign investments, financing for development, foreign exchange markets and risks, international diversification, and global funds.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS332

 

BUS345 Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This is a foundation course designed to provide a basic understanding of the theory and practice of accounting, with emphasis upon principles, concepts and controls involved with Financial Accounting. The objective of financial accounting is to collect accurate, systematic, and timely financial data and other financial information, and to compile and consolidate it in an organized and systematic way, according to the principles and rules of accounting, for external reporting purpose.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS346 Managerial Accounting and Control (Credits: 3)

Managerial Accounting is the process of identifying, measuring, analyzing and communicating financial information needed by management to plan, evaluate and control an organization’s operations. In this course  students understand the role of a management accountant in organizations;  identify relevant and irrelevant revenues and costs;  understand cost-volume-profit analyses;  calculate and interpret product costs, construct income statements and identify inventory balances,  understand the budget process and responsibility accounting,  and understand standard cost systems and production cost variances.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS345

 

BUS348 Financial Statement Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course provides a framework for using financial statements in business analyses. Emphasis is placed on understanding business as a financial system where management makes decisions in three key areas: investment, financing and operations. The course will outline the main financial statements used in the decision-making process and the main profitability and risk ratios used in comparing/assessing companies across different sizes and industries. The course will also include studying the main accounting principles used for compiling financial statements and analyzing qualitative information appearing in the financial statements and, finally, the role of financial Information in Valuation.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS350 Taxation and Business Decisions (Credits: 2)

Taxation related issues are also studied in another required course, Economic policy for development and competitiveness, and, in order to provide a richer set of choices for students in specialization, we propose the above change. Topics in this course are specific to the Armenian and global taxation, and, given that students acquire general and self-content knowledge in the above mentioned required course, students are better to self-select whether they want to further study peculiarities of taxation.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS346

 

BUS351 Cost Accounting (Credits: 2)

Intense competition in product markets has forced firms to look inward to become more cost-efficient. Tracing various resource costs accurately to products has become increasingly important as product margins are squeezed. Through a number of case studies supplemented by some lectures, this course exposes students to recent advances in cost accounting, and highlights important inputs into the design of cost systems. The cases cover a variety of decision-making settings and illustrate the role of cost information in these settings. Specific topics to be covered include the important characteristics of good costing systems, various cost allocation systems, reporting and the control of scrap/spoilage/rework products, accounting controls for production activities and for decentralized operations, including transfer pricing, customers profitability analysis, sales mix variances and performance measurement, and capital budgeting.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS346 AND BUS380

 

BUS352 Armenian Taxation (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on all relevant Armenian Tax issues. Emphasis will be placed on taxes impacting business activities including: profits tax, income tax, VAT, excise tax, property tax, and tax administration. This course has a strong practical element in that students will be required to prepare various types of tax computations and offer advice on tax planning. Comparisons will also be made to tax regimes in developed market economies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS353 Auditing and Evaluation Controls (Credits: 3)

The focus of this course is on independent auditors’ examinations of accounting information systems and related internal controls and evidential matter as a basis for expressing an opinion on financial statements. In this course students will develop a sound understanding of auditing theory and concepts. The rationale and objectives of specific auditing techniques will be emphasized. The focus will be on helping students develop analytical and critical thinking skills. It will also cover professional ethics, internal controls, and International Standards of Auditing.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS346

 

BUS355 Advanced Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the advanced topics such as Business Combinations, Consolidations, Accounting for Multinational Enterprises, Partnership, Governmental Accounting and Accounting for Nonprofit Organizations. At the completion of this course, the student will be able to apply the equity method to accounting for investments; understand the difference between pooling of interest and purchase methods of accounting for investment; prepare consolidated financial statements; prepare and discuss segment reporting; explain the accounting issues, presentation and alternatives relating to foreign current transactions and translations; and explain how governmental and nonprofit accounting differs from for-profit accounting.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS357 International Accounting (Credits: 2)

This course examines the international dimension of financial reporting and analysis. It provides students with an in-depth look at the multinational enterprise and the preparation and presentation of financial statements in different nations. Topics covered include international corporate taxation, transfer pricing, foreign currency translation, financial disclosure, and international accounting harmonization.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS346

 

BUS359 Special Topics in Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in Accounting. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other Accounting courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS360 Marketing Management (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to the role of marketing within the business firm. Quantitative methods and behavioral theories are utilized. It provides the student an opportunity to apply analytical concepts and techniques developed in psychology, economics, quantitative analysis, accounting, and finance to marketing problems. The course will utilize case studies, and oral and written presentations. Specific topics to be covered include: customer analysis and buyer behavior, market segmentation, market research, distribution channels, product pricing and strategy, pricing, advertising, and sales force management.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS362 Services Marketing (Credits: 2)

Services marketing is intended to broaden the understanding of how marketing is practiced in the service industry. The course will apply the principles of service marketing to organizations in the private, non-profit and public sectors. Service Marketing is designed to help individuals understand the critical elements in the development of customer satisfaction and service quality in today’s competitive business world.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS360

 

BUS364 International Marketing (Credits: 2)

The international arena is a requirement for any firm that wishes to achieve its maximum growth potential. The main objectives of this course are to present the main approaches to international marketing (from export to global marketing), help students to tackle strategic marketing problems facing international companies, and familiarize students with tools and techniques required in a complex and ever changing environment.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS360

 

BUS365 Marketing Research (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to examine marketing research as an information providing activity for the purpose of management decision-making. Students will acquire the skills to examine alternative research designs and their relative strengths and weaknesses; to develop the meaning of measurement and scaling and their application in marketing research; to have a general understanding of the process of obtaining information by surveys of respondents, and to discuss the analysis of data obtained through marketing research Upon successful completion of this course, the students will understand how to develop a research proposal, compose questionnaires, and conduct market data analysis.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS320 AND BUS360

 

BUS366 Advertising Management (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to give students the basic understanding of advertising principles and practices. Methods used and effectiveness of various types of advertising will be analyzed. Because our environment has grown increasingly complex and technology is rapidly changing, it is essential that students understand the role played by advertising in our society and the advertising consequences: every principle and practice that stimulates the purchase act.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS369 Special Topics in Marketing (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in marketing and advertising. The subjects of Armenian market trends are investigated, as well as, global technology and developments which then are applied to the country’s transitional business techniques. Different topics will be covered.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS370 Strategic Marketing (Credits: 2)

It is an integrative course designed to provide an executive perspective of strategy. This course focuses on making and analyzing complex decisions to describe the firm’s 38 BREAKstrategies for long-term survival and growth in competitive markets. Techniques for analysis of environmental conditions and trends, opportunities and threats, and resource strengths and limitations are examined. The primary method of instruction will be case analysis.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS360

 

BUS372 Measurement Issues in Marketing (Credits: 2)

The objective of this course is to acquaint student will the application of various multivariate techniques to specific marketing problem areas. Students will learn how to apply factor analysis, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling, and conjoint analysis to develop segmentation, product development, pricing and advertising models.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS320 AND BUS360

 

BUS373 Innovation Marketing (Credits: 2)

Students will learn about the wisdom acquired over many years regarding the managerial practice in new product development, innovation management, and launching of new products in the market. By the end of the course students are expected to be learn about the innovation process, how to create a successful innovation, the process of design and marketing new products, how to bring an existing product, service or technology into the market, and how state of the art innovation analytic methods can reduce risks and improve the possibilities of market success.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS360

 

BUS375 Competition Law (Credits: 3)

This course studies the relevant markets from the competition law perspectives. It Identifies and describes the ways by which IPR violations and enforcement may constitute anti-competitive practices and  explains the limits on commercial communications in terms of misleading and discrediting.  The course describes main types of regulation of unilateral and collective anti-competitive practices, mergers and acquisitions, as well as explains key challenges of anti-trust enforcement (including cross-border situations).  The course will explore the rationale behind each land-mark case of the EU and US antitrust law and highlight the differences of regulation in the EU and US regimes.  Student will learn about anti-trust regulations and enforcement practices, aimed at increasing competitiveness without engaging in anti-competitive conduct.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS377 Venture Capital Management (Credits: 2)

This course on Venture Capital (VC) management provides knowledge and skills necessary to be part of a VC/Acceleration program team, as well as critical insights for those who want to engage in startup business development. The course has both lecture component (involving also guest speakers from the startup ecosystem) as well as interactive assignments related to real companies. By successfully completing this course the students are expected to develop knowledge and skills to analyze venture deals, actively participate in due diligence, deliver presentations on venture investing. Instructor led discussions and lectures, and assessment by projects, presentations, and exams.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS378 Business Intelligence (Credits: 2)

This course provides an introduction to the main concepts of Business Intelligence (BI). It aims to supply the necessary skillset for querying and reporting data, working with databases and using dashboards for visualization. Leading BI tools will be introduced during the course. Multidimensional analysis of the business data will be conducted through Online Analytical Processing cubes (OLAP). Business performance management problems will be addressed through descriptive analytics, and predictive models will be applied whenever appropriate.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS380 Operations and Process Management (Credits: 3)

The focus of this course will be on the quantitative aspects of the elements, which contribute to the effective and efficient operations of an enterprise. Emphasis will be equally placed on the means for attaining organizational objectives for both service and manufacturing oriented entities. Topical areas will be the planning for and management of services and/or products, the design of processes, facility location and layout, forecasting, scheduling, and quality control.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS381 Management of Information Resources (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to make the students knowledgeable about the fundamentals underlying the design, implementation, control, evaluation, and strategic use of modern, computer-based information systems for business data processing, office automation, information reporting, and decision-making.  The course focuses on using and managing information technologies to derive business value and to secure a competitive advantage.

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BUS382 Supply Chain Management (Credits: 2)

This course focuses upon the strategic impor­tance of supply chain management. The purpose of the course is to design and manage business- to-business to retail supply chain purchasing and distribution systems, and to formulate an inte­grated supply chain strategy that is supportive of various corporate strategies. New purchasing and distribution opportunities for businesses and inter/intra company communications systems designed for creating a more efficient marketplace are explored.

Corequisite:

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BUS384 Digital Commerce (Credits: 2)

This course covers e-commerce applications, methodologies, and services that address business solutions needed for electronic procurement, supplier management, and customer relationship management.  Real-life examples and case studies are examined to provide the student with working knowledge of constructing an E-Business, Business and Revenue Models, E-Marketplaces, Internet auctions, Internet and Web Programming, Legal Issues and E-Commerce /Digital Commerce strategy.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS385 Project Management (Credits: 2)

In this course students learn project management skills that are essential for current or future managers regardless of their career concentration. Some of the topics covered include life cycle models; project selection; project monitoring and control; planning with uncertainty; managing scope, risk, quality, time and costs; procurement; human resources and communications; the critical chain method; and managing multiple projects. It also discusses commercial project management software and how to overcome its limited functionality to address the requirements of managing risky, complex projects in practice.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS305 AND BUS345 AND BUS346 AND BUS380

 

BUS388 Managing Companies at the Base of the Pyramid (Credits: 2)

This is a General Management course aimed at graduate students – potential entrepreneurs, managers and executives – who are interested in exploring new market-based approaches to poverty alleviation and addressing the needs of marginalized part of the population, especially in developing countries such as Armenia. The course integrates concepts of non-profit management, microfinance, inclusive growth and international business to stimulate the analytical thinking and leadership skills necessary for launching and managing Base-of- the-Pyramid (BoP) ventures. Through combination of lectures, international and local case studies, readings, videos and guest sessions, the course will engage students in discussions aimed at: 1) identifying the opportunities related to innovative perspectives on serving BoP markets; and 2) developing the strategies, business models, managerial practices and partnerships required to productively explore those opportunities. 2 hours of instructor-led class time per week

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS389 Experimental and Survey Design (Credits: 2)

This course will provide the students with strong background in experimental and survey design through structured lectures and classroom discussions. Given the latest developments in behavioral sciences, the course will also illustrate how behavioral/experimental methods can be applied to understand the decisions of individuals in such aspects as savings, tax compliance, investments and the like. Third the course will also tackle how experimental/behavioral methods can be used to study aspects of organizational structure and economic performance. Students will be evaluated based on 1) individual and group participation in the class, 2) individual written critique on the papers assigned as home reading and the discussion of the critique in the classroom, 3) a designed survey or experiment based on a research question agreed with the instructor.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS390 Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Incubation (Credits: 2)

The purpose of this integrative practicum is to understand how new business opportunities are identified and commercialized. The course structure follows the evolutionary process of a new venture: Idea assessment, organization formation, capitalization, growth, and exit. The course integrates much of what students have learned in their first year courses and challenges them to apply the newly acquired knowledge and tools to a real business situation. The course combines theoretical and applied learning, including lectures, guest speakers, traditional case studies and “live” new venture projects. Under the guidance of the faculty and with the support of mentors, student teams take a multidisciplinary approach to the preparation and presentation of a business plan for a real new venture. In the process, students are expected to make difficult business choices with less than perfect information, dealing with ambiguity and uncertainty. Students conclude their project with an oral presentation in addition to a full written report.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS330 AND BUS345 AND BUS346

 

BUS391 Startups: Science and Practice (Credits: 3)

This course aims to provide the necessary skillset for establishing and running a successful modern startup. It focuses on best practices and covers the fundamentals, which can establish a base for executing all stages of startup creation, idea selection, measurement, product building, user acquisition, innovation management, execution, fundraising, and choosing an exit strategy. By the end of the course, students will be able to choose ideas to work on, form teams, incorporate, develop the product, fundraise and commercialize their ideas. The course structure is case-based

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS392 Strategic Project Consulting (Credits: 4)

The third-year integrative practicum combines theoretical and applied learning, including lectures, guest speakers, traditional case studies and “live” projects that requires student teams apply classroom learning to complex, real-world business challenges for partner organizations. Under the guidance of the faculty member(s) and with the support of mentors, student teams develop practical problem-solving and consulting skills while their partners – ranging from multinational corporations to local nonprofit organizations – benefit from the student’s experience and knowhow. Students are expected to integrate and apply the knowledge and tools acquired in the previous two years of MBA studies and in their professional career to a real business situation; enhance and develop their project management and consulting skills; and hone their leadership skills. Students conclude their project with an oral presentation in addition to a full written report.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS314 AND BUS315 AND BUS385

 

BUS395 Business Policy and Strategy (Credits: 4)

This FTMBA course provides an opportunity for students to cap and integrate concepts from prior functional courses through the development and implementation of a business strategy. The course is designed to deepen students understanding of strategy formulation, competitive advantage, rivalry and competition, negotiation, financial control, operational excellence, and team building. The course format involves lectures, class discussion, comprehensive case studies, an intensive business strategy simulation, and a consulting project. The strategy simulation requires multifunctional teams of students to formulate and implement strategy for a simulated firm within a highly competitive industry. The consulting project module challenges students with real-world problems faced by partner organizations in specific functional areas. Student teams, formed according to their selected MBA concentration tracks, work with the functional managers and senior executives at these organizations to develop applicable solutions. Students conclude their project with an oral presentation in addition to a full written report.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS300 AND BUS345 AND BUS322 AND BUS330 AND BUS305 AND BUS360 AND BUS380

 

BUS396 MBA Capstone (Credits: 4)

The MBA Capstone course provides an opportunity for students to cap and integrate concepts from prior functional courses through the development and implementation of business models. The course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of strategy formulation, competitive advantage, rivalry and competition, and strategy execution (negotiation, financial control, operational excellence, and team building).  Throughout the course, the teams will work to develop a written project under the mentorship of their advising instructor. During instructor-led 4 weekly class meetings (equals 1 credit), students will review key components of research methods. Afterwards, teams start working on their research project under the faculty supervision. At the end of the course, student teams will present their projects to faculty and peers and often to business leaders and knowledgeable professionals. Students’ grades will be based upon the quality of the oral presentation and written reports, proficiency in each of the functional areas of business, ability to make strategic and analytical decisions, and competence working both independently and collaboratively.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

BUS399 Independent Study (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CBE102 Introduction to Personal Finance (Credits: 3)

This course provides a framework for understanding the basics of financial literacy.  Emphasis is placed on students becoming familiar with key components of the Armenian financial system as they relate to personal financial health.  Topics to be addressed are an understanding of money origination and its turnover, basics of investing, insurance, banking products such as loans and savings accounts, credit and debit cards, current accounts, and others.  The course will also study the major principles of different types of interest calculations and, finally, the importance of having and maintaining a good credit score.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON101 Introduction to Economics (Credits: 3)

This course examines key concepts in both microeconomics and macroeconomics.  The course explores individual consumer and industry behavior, supply and demand, market efficiency and equilibrium and the impact of government intervention.  Students will also analyze the economy as a whole, especially issues related to output, unemployment, productivity, inflation, trade, and economic growth and development.  Students will use these basic concepts to weigh different perspectives on monetary and fiscal policy and evaluate economic claims used in articles and newspapers, political campaigns, and debates. Home tasks will include reading assignments and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON120 Evolution of Economic Thought (Credits: 3)

This course examines the development of economic theories, models, and schools of thought from the birth of market economies to the present. Topics include the historical, institutional, and social forces shaping economic thinking and public policy. The course emphasizes foundational issues such as the role of the state in the economy, the social and economic consequences of property, prices, money, production, trade and other defining attributes of contemporary society. Home tasks include reading, research, and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121

 

ECON121 Principles of Microeconomics (Credits: 3)

This course examines basic principles of microeconomics including core elements of supply and demand, opportunity cost, market equilibrium, elasticity, and income distribution. Students will use these basic principles to evaluate market efficiency and social welfare resulting from the interactions of consumers, firms, and government regulation and intervention.  Students will learn to define these basic principles and appropriately apply them to analyze case studies and current economic problems.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and use appropriate software to solve problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON122 Principles of Macroeconomics (Credits: 3)

This course examines aggregate economic activity in relation to the level, stability, and growth of national income, consumption, employment, interest rates, and inflation as well as the impact of the global economy.  The course emphasizes the role and impact of monetary and fiscal policy on domestic and international economic stability and growth. Students will learn to describe and apply basic principles of macroeconomics as well as analyze the impact of monetary and fiscal policy on aggregate national and international economics.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and use appropriate software to complete problem sets and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON221 Intermediate Microeconomics (Credits: 3)

The course examines the theories of utility and demand, production, cost functions in the short and long run general equilibrium analysis, and supply under differing market conditions of perfect competition and monopoly. Problems and applications are used to acquaint students with the implications of the theoretical concepts. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121 AND BUS109 OR CS100

 

ECON222 Intermediate Macroeconomics (Credits: 3)

Building on topics introduced in ECON 122, Principles of Macroeconomics, this course covers topics including per capita income theories and comparisons across countries and time, fluctuations in output and employment, and the role of government in influencing aggregate variables. Home tasks include reading, research, and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121

 

ECON223 Economics of Sustainable Development (Credits: 3)

This course examines the concepts and methods used to analyze the interactions among the economy, the environment and society. . Students will work individually and in groups to examine how markets can address environmental and societal problems and promote sustainable development. Home tasks include reading, research, and case analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121

 

ECON224 Introduction to Econometrics (Credits: 3)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to econometrics.  Students will learn to apply relevant models and methods to estimate relationships between economic variables, test hypotheses, and solve economic problems using appropriate software. Topics include theoretic probability, random variables, single and multiple regression analysis, functional forms, omitted variable analysis, multicollinearity, heteroscedesticity, autocorrelation, simultaneous equations, and dynamic models. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121 AND BUS109 OR CS100

 

ECON225 International Economics (Credits: 3)

This course examines globalization, international monetary issues, and  international trade in a world of nation states and international and regional organizations. Students will explore theories and apply them to policy issues. Topics include foreign exchange markets, balance-of-payment adjustment, exchange rate theories, impediments to trade, financial crises, and monetary and fiscal policy in a global economy. Home tasks will include reading assignments and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS112

 

ECON228 Economics of Development (Credits: 3)

This course examines the evolving definition of economic development and the changing processes that support and hinder it.  Students will be introduced to a range of development theories and will analyze how economic development is impacted by human capital (education, health and nutrition), income distribution, the rural and urban sectors, technology, investment, property rights and contracts, international migration and remittances, infrastructure. The course will also cover national and international policies and reforms, financial markets, foreign trade, foreign aid, and international institutions.  Through this course, students will learn to measure economic development, analyze variables that contribute to or deter it, and develop evidence-based solutions to real-world economic challenges.  Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON122 AND ECON121

 

ECON229 Special Topics in Economics (Credits: 3)

This course explores topics in economics with emphasis on current problems and research. Topics to be announced prior to course registration.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON121 AND BUS112

 

ECON300 Quantitative Methods for Economists (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to mathematics used in economics. Students learn to apply mathematical tools and methods in order to design models in economic analysis and to be able to read, understand, analyze and apply to economic theories and problems. Topics include integral calculus, multivariate calculus, optimization theory, linear algebra (matrix algebra), implicit function theorem, difference and differential equations. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and solve problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite: ECON320

Prerequisite:

 

ECON310 Economic Statistics (Credits: 3)

This course provides students with a survey of statistical methodology. Topics include probability and sampling, distribution theory, hypothesis testing, estimation, analysis of variance, confidence intervals, and linear regression. Students are required to complete biweekly problem sets by solving exercises and using statistical software. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON311 Econometrics (Credits: 3)

Through this course, students learn to apply statistical methods to quantify economic relationships. Topics include econometric models, hypothesis testing, least squares, instrumental variables, panel data methods, and time series. Through lectures and weekly problem sets, students learn to use statistical software to test and estimate economic relationships and evaluate empirical economic research. Students apply what they learn to real data and write an empirical paper on a topic of interest. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON300 AND ECON310

 

ECON315 Financial Econometrics and Time Series Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to data analysis and econometric modeling using applications in finance and time series. The course uses concepts from microeconomics, finance, mathematical optimization, data analysis, probability models, statistical analysis, and econometrics. The course will be 16 weeks long. Each week consists of one 150 minutes lecture. Finance topics include asset return calculations, risk and performance measures, portfolio theory, index models, and applied time series analysis. Quantitative methods involve basic matrix algebra. Statistical topics include probabilities, expectation, joint distributions, covariance, normal distribution, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, data analysis, linear regression, time series methods and simulations. There will be weekly frequent homework assignments requiring STATA programming. Students will work independently and periodically in groups to complete problem sets and group projects. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final exams. The course qualifies for all MSE tracks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON310

 

ECON316 Topics in Applied Health Econometrics  (seminar) (Credits: 3)

This course reviews a range of econometric methods (such as Probit, Logit, Tobit, Poisson, Negative Binomial, LAD, Matching, GLM) that have been used for testing economic hypotheses in health outcomes. Starting with an introduction to health outcomes, the course will proceed to advanced econometric methods for addressing specific problems generated by either the nature of the data generation process or the economic relationships being examined. The course will develop your econometric skills in several ways. First, the course will review numerous econometric models and in each case discuss the type of problems the model is suited for, how to test hypotheses, and the shortcomings of various models. Second, you will be asked to prepare two presentations; first presentation will cover a particular method and second presentation will cover health condition related outcomes. Third, to assist in the development of your data management, modeling, computer, and interpretative skills, you will use Stata to analyze data. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm, project/presentation and final exams. The course qualifies for the MSE Applied Economics track.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON310

 

ECON317 Data Scraping (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce the main methods of acquiring data from the web and other digital sources. Students will learn how to scrape, parse, and read web data as well as access data using web APIs (e.g. Twitter, LinkedIn etc.). They will work with HTML, JSON and other data formats in Python. They will also learn how to use a set of freely available tools to gather data from the web. The format of the course will be mainly case-based introducing the applications of data scraping in various aspects of business and economics. Student’s work will be evaluated based on class participation, quizzes/problem-sets, midterm and final project. The course qualifies for the MSE Applied Economics track.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON310

 

ECON318 Advanced Econometrics I (Credits: 3)

Econometric methods for microeconometric models. Topics include limited dependent variable, qualitative variable, duration, and other models. The course will help you to develop data management, modeling, statistical programing, and interpretative skills. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm, project/presentation and final exams.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON310

 

ECON319 Advanced Econometrics II (Credits: 3)

Econometric methods for empirical research in economics. Topics include matching, quantile regression analysis, CART Trees (Decision Trees, Regression), Neural Networks and other models and their applications in Economics. The course will help you to develop data scraping and management, modeling, visualization, statistical programming, and interpretative skills. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm, project/presentation, and final exams.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON318

 

ECON320 Microeconomic Theory (Credits: 3)

The course covers key topics in the modern microeconomic theory at an advanced graduate level. It focuses on the behavior of individual consumers and firms in making economic decisions and on how these decisions affect market outcomes. Topics include consumer and producer theory, decision making under uncertainty, general equilibrium and welfare properties, market equilibrium and market failure, perfect and imperfect competition. Throughout the course, students analyze various microeconomic problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model economic phenomena from the perspective of the individual agents.

Corequisite: ECON300

Prerequisite:

 

ECON327 Industrial Organizations (Credits: 3)

The course is designed to equip students with tools necessary to study complex market structures and firm behavior. It starts by covering main topics in game theory that are necessary to analyze strategic interactions of the firms in the markets. In particular students will master concepts of perfect and Bayesian equilibrium: the necessary building blocks of IO models. Theoretical models will address issues of static and dynamic price competitions, repeated interactions and tacit collusions, spatial and monopolistic competition, strategies of entry and accommodation. Students will also be introduced to firms’ competitive behavior under asymmetry of information. Empirical models will mainly deal with complex problem of demand estimation in industries.  Students will be provided with specific reference materials, but will be expected to read more advanced materials on some selected topics. Evaluations will be based on homeworks and exams, as well as they will be asked to read, analyze and present a seminal paper on IO and discuss it with their peers. This is a 3 credit hour course.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON320 AND ECON330

 

ECON330 Macroeconomic Theory (Credits: 3)

The course covers key topics in the modern macroeconomic theory at an advanced graduate level. It focuses on models of medium- and long-run macroeconomic dynamics and their empirical implications. Topics include different models of economic growth, theories of aggregate fluctuations, macroeconomic policy and their implications. Throughout the course, students analyze various macroeconomic problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model economic phenomena from the macroeconomic perspective.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON331 Monetary Theory and Policy (Credits: 3)

The course focuses on monetary aspects of the business cycle. Using different theoretical models the course studies the goals of monetary policy, the choice of policy instruments, the rule-versus-discretion debate, central bank credibility and etc. Throughout the course students analyze various problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model monetary phenomena. Students will be graded on problem sets, midterm and final exams. This is a 3 credit hour course. The course qualifies for the MSE Monetary and Macroeconomic Policy track.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON320 AND ECON330

 

ECON335 Monetary Policy and Financial Markets (Credits: 3)

The course covers topics in monetary policy and financial markets. It consists of two parts. The first part focuses on monetary aspects of the business cycle and covers different theoretical models of monetary policy, as well as relevant empirical evidence. The second part focuses on pricing of bonds, forward and futures contracts, risk measures, portfolio analysis and asset pricing models. During the course MatLab is used to simulate models and implement different methods. Throughout the course, students analyze various problems and policy issues by completing the weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model monetary and financial phenomena, as well as to study the impacts of implemented monetary policy. The course requires a solid background in mathematics. The course qualifies for the MSE Monetary and Macroeconomic Policy track.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON320 AND ECON330 AND ECON300

 

ECON336 Macroeconomic Policy Seminar (Credits: 3)

The course explores 3 major areas of modern macro–economic policies including basic policy goals, instruments, policy design, applications and their consequences. First the most prominent types of monetary policy regimes will be discussed, such as Inflation Targeting under flexible exchange rate, which will be followed by discussion on various forms of monetary systems and exchange rate regimes. Second macro prudential and regulatory policies for maintaining financial stability will be investigated. The third topic of the course will be de devoted to fiscal policy. Finally the course will touch such topics as international policy coordination, supervision and coordination or tradeoffs among monetary and fiscal/macro prudential policies.BREAKThe primary focus will be both on advanced economies and emerging markets including Armenia. The prevention and management of various types of economic crises will be discussed. In particular the 2008 US crisis, ongoing Eurozone crisis, their spillovers onto emerging markets and recent CIS region crisis and currency depreciations will be analyzed. Students will be graded on class participation, midterm and final exams. This is a 3 credit hour course. The course qualifies for the MSE Monetary and Macroeconomic Policy track.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON320 AND ECON330 AND ECON331

 

ECON340 International Trade (Credits: 3)

In this course we will study the main topics in the area of international trade and trade policy. Firstly, we refresh our knowledge in micro-foundations, intensively used throughout the course. Then we study the traditional trade theories and review the relevant empirical literature. In the second part of the course, we discuss trade policies such as tariffs, quotas and non-tariff barriers, as well as the key role of foreign direct investments and multinational firms in economic growth. Throughout the course, much time will be devoted to analyze empirical challenges in the discipline.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON300 AND ECON310 AND ECON320

 

ECON350 Financial Economics (Credits: 3)

Much of modern financial economics works with models in which agents are rational and arbitrageurs can fix any mis-pricing. Behavioral Financial Economics is the area of finance which relaxes both of these assumptions. Behavioral models usually have two building blocks: limits to arbitrage, which make it difficult for rational traders to undo the dislocations caused by less rational traders; and psychology, which catalogues the kinds of deviations from full rationality we might expect to see. We discuss these two topics, and then consider a number of applications such as asset pricing (the aggregate stock market and the cross-section of average returns) or individual investor portfolio choice and trading behavior.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON300 AND ECON320

 

ECON351 Finance Theory (Credits: 3)

This course covers modern finance theory and practice. The topics of the course include: 1) functions of financial markets and intermediaries; 2) analysis and valuation of traded securities; 3) portfolio management theory, tools for portfolio performance measurement and asset pricing models; 4) fixed-income securities; 5) introduction to derivatives and alternative investments; 6) SAA models and risk management tools; and 7) applications of economic analysis to portfolio management. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final exams. The course qualifies for the MSE Finance track.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON353 Economics of Corporate Finance (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to learn the economics behind financial tools that are used in financial decision making process. The course presents the economic insights of corporate finance theory and emphasizes the application of theory to real-life financial decisions. Several real business cases will be discussed during the course.  Student’s work will be evaluated based on class participation, quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final project. The course qualifies for the MSE Finance track

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON354 Asset Allocation and Multi-asset Investing (Credits: 3)

The course examines asset allocation and multi-asset investing from a practitioner’s perspective. It is intended to explore the strategies, themes, and formal building blocks that practicing asset allocators need to be proficient in. In addition to becoming familiar with the substance of a range of investment topics, students will be taught how to present research and investment results in a professional setting. Student’s work will be evaluated based on class participation, in-class quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final project. The course qualifies for the MSE Finance track.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON315 AND ECON351

 

ECON355 Financial Markets and Modeling (Credits: 3)

The course examines the composition of financial markets, the analysis and valuation of traded securities, portfolio management theory and tools for portfolio performance measurement. To increase the practical skills of the students, relevant software is used to develop different methods and financial models. Throughout the course students analyze various problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand financial relationships, how financial markets operate and employ quantitative techniques to analyze and evaluate investment decisions. Students will be graded on problem sets, midterm and final exams. This is a 3 credit hour course.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON320 AND ECON330

 

ECON360 Public Economics (Credits: 3)

This course examines the role of government in the economy, and how the market may fail to produce efficient or equitable outcomes. We consider policies that may correct for market failures, and challenges posed by politics and incomplete information. The course will have a strong theoretical angle. It also includes an overview of the federal, state, and local budgets, and takes both a contemporary and historical look at the role of government in providing defense, infrastructure, education, pensions, health care, unemployment insurance, and other services.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON300 AND ECON320

 

ECON361 Sustainable Development (Credits: 1)

The purpose of this course is to develop general understanding of sustainable development (SD) and the way this paradigm is translated into policy-making. Three basic blocks of the concept are presented step by step: economic development, social change and conservation of environment. The course will begin with reviewing the current state of the planet, exploring the inception of the SD concept, and international efforts undertaken in the mainstream of this concept since early 70s. Then the focus will shift to economic policy and discuss economic growth vs. economic development. The course will then move to the issues of social change, particularly addressing poverty and hunger, income inequality, education and human capital as factors of SD. Next the instructor will turn to the issues of overpopulation, urbanization, scarcity of natural resources and impact of these factors on SD.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ECON380 Professional Internship (Credits: 3)

During Professional Internship the student is expected to gain experience and improve skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Students must discuss specific learning objectives with the MSE program chair and internship coordinator at the beginning of the semester and receive approval of their plans in order to register and receive credits for the internship. The internship must be related to economics and finance, and require knowledge suitable for a master’s degree level. The total work load requirement is 8-10 hours per week for 15 weeks, which includes both hours at the workplace and hours needed to compete the research or analysis related to the work. At semester end, each student prepares a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the internship coordinator and program chair based on written report and report presentation. Depending on the internship type the course may qualify for MSE track credit, upon program chair approval.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON300 AND ECON310 AND ECON320 AND ECON330 AND Instructor’s Permission

 

ECON385 Economic Research Seminar (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to economic research methods, prepares them to conduct independent research, and is essential for students’ capstone writing course.  Students will be exposed to an array of research designs and reports, which they analyze and critique as well as use to inform the development of their own research.  By mid-term, students prepare a formal proposal and presentation for their capstone research project, with the following components: 1) research question, 2) literature review, and 3) description of research methods. After receiving feedback from instructor and peers, students begin to collect and analyze their data.  By the end of the course, students will complete a written report and present their findings from the research collected and analyzed. This report and presentation will serve as the basis for students’ capstone projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON300 AND ECON320 AND ECON310 AND ECON311 AND ECON330

 

ECON386 Capstone (Credits: 3)

As the culminating experience for the MS in Economics degree, the capstone course is a 6 credit writing course during which students write a report and deliver a presentation based on the research they began in the Economic Research Seminar course. Due to the individualized nature of capstone projects, students meet with their advisor to review the progress of their research and writing and receive guidance. At the end of the course students are required to produce and present to faculty and peers a research report (thesis) of publishable quality.

Corequisite: ECON385

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT300 Quantitative Tools for Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides an intensive introduction to core concepts in mathematics and statistics, and the main tools that necessary for quantitative analysis in decision-making process. Topics include optimization, financial mathematics, probability theory and data analysis. Materials are of depth and coverage necessary for efficient progress in subsequent courses of business analytics, finance, operations management and others. Students will utilize software such as MS Excel and SPSS to solve problems. This intensive course will be a combination of instructor led lectures and computer-lab sessions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT323 Business Strategy (Credits: 3)

In this course, students will develop the ability to think strategically about business problems by analyzing challenges in various industries with a focus on the roles of key players and the fundamentals of analytical and strategic reasoning.  Through case studies, students will examine the different stages involved in making and implementing strategic decisions: defining the problem(s), establishing the criteria (both quantitative and qualitative), designing alternative solutions, and making a decision based on objective criteria.  Examples of applied competitive and industry analysis are emphasized.  Instructor-led discussions with extensive use of case studies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT325 Business Analytics (Credits: 3)

Business analytics focuses on data-driven decision making in business.  Applications of business analytics can be utilized in operations, marketing, finance, human resource management among other functional areas of business.  In this course, students will examine selected cases to learn how to make reliable forecasting (predictive analytics), evaluate impact of certain decisions (prescriptive analytics), as well as solve optimization problems while exploring the challenges that can arise in implementing analytical approaches within an organization.  Instructor-led discussion and lab time based on designated cases, as well as applied home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: MGMT300

 

MGMT326 Managerial Finance (Credits: 3)

This course studies the effects of time and uncertainty on decision-making. Topics include discounted cash flow valuation, stock and bond valuation, the term structure of interest rates, capital budgeting, risk and return, dividend policy decisions, portfolio theory, asset pricing models and efficient markets. Instructor-led lectures and discussions with case studies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT327 Management of Financial Institutions (Credits: 2)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT328 Advanced Topics in Data Analysis (Credits: 2)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT331 Behavioural Economics for Management (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the behavioral aspects of economic decisions made by managers of business firms, the employees and the consumers of their products and services. The course briefly reviews the basis for economic decision making and turns to consideration of various models of behavioral economics, mostly refraining from mathematical representations. Topics covered will address perceptions of risks, self-control and time (in)consistency issues, social motivations (reciprocity, trust, inequity, etc.), mistakes in decision making and others. The course relies on readings from various articles and handbooks and applies case-studies for facilitating the learning.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: MGMT300

 

MGMT341 Organizational Behavior (Credits: 3)

This course provides a thorough overview of the major concepts in organizational behavior and issues that (private) organizations face nowadays. The course approaches organizational behavior as human behavior in the workplace and studies aspects of human motivation, organizational culture and structure, team-work and decision-making, power and leadership, and communication. It also explores how individuals influence organizations and how organizations influence individual behavior at work. A combination of conceptual and experiential approaches, including case analyses, videos, diagnostic self-assessments, peer and group discussions are utilized throughout course.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT344 Accounting for Decision Making (Credits: 3)

This course examines managerial decision making using information for internal efficiency and application of evidence-based approach in the relationships with external environment. Students will analyze the complex relationships between accounting techniques and other organizational activities including incremental costs and benefits of an undertaking, optimal resource allocation, efficiency measurement and improvements, pricing strategy, working capital management, profitability management, costing techniques, etc. Instructor-led discussions are accompanied by extensive use of problem sets and complex cases.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT361 Marketing Management (Credits: 3)

This course is an in-depth exploration of marketing processes and tools.  Students will learn how to design and implement effective marketing to carry out a firm’s strategy. Through case studies, presentations, and an integrated marketing plan students will apply analytical concepts and techniques developed in psychology, economics, quantitative analysis, accounting, and finance to marketing problems. Topics include customer analysis and buyer behavior, market segmentation, market research, distribution channels, product strategy, pricing, advertising, and sales force management.  Quantitative methods and behavioral theories will be utilized. Instructor-led class time including lectures, discussions and case studies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT362 Digital Marketing (Credits: 2)

The course is built to teach students the three pillars of digital marketing: (i) How to acquire customers, (ii) How to retain customers, (iii) How to optimize acquisition and retention channels. Students will learn how to shape a successful digital marketing strategy, by building and optimizing channels, campaigns, technology, presence, and decision making processes. Instructor-led classes, including lectures, discussions and industry standard guides. The course will be interactive, and active class participation is expected.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: MGMT361

 

MGMT381 Operations Management (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT391 Research Methods (Credits: 1)

This course introduces students to fundamental research methods including the theory of empirical research and major quantitative and qualitative data collection methodologies and statistical analyses used.  The courses emphasizes the difference between research paper and a technical report.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

MGMT392 Capstone (Credits: 3)

Capstone (Choose: Master’s Thesis or Client Consulting). In this course students will apply knowledge in finance, accounting, operations, marketing, and organizational behavior courses in practical application in real-life projects.  Students will have a choice to either 1) develop a management consulting project posed by real companies, or 2) engage in independent research.   Students may work in close collaboration with AUA’s Entrepreneurship and Product Innovation Center (EPIC). Students are expected to demonstrate advanced analytical skills and the ability to synthesize knowledge and methodologies.  Students will meet throughout the course with a faculty supervisor as well as external mentors (company representative or consultants) who will guide them through the process and ensure that milestones are achieved and deliverables are met.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: MGMT391

 

 

 

 

 

 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHSS)

 

CHSS101 Introductory Eastern Armenian (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to written and conversational Eastern Armenian for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The course covers reading and comprehension, grammar rules, syntax and basic sentences. The course will also include visits by various scholars, writers, and artists, and trips to galleries and museums featuring ancient and contemporary Armenian artifacts and manuscripts.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CHSS102 Intermediate Eastern Armenian (Credits: 3)

This is an intermediate level Eastern Armenian course for students with basic knowledge of the language. Students must be able to read and write Armenian, and have basic conversational skills. The course is designed to enhance reading, speaking, and writing skills through the use of literary texts, through the application of syntax rules, through lectures, class discussions, group work, video-audio presentations, visits by various scholars, writers and artists, and occasional visits to galleries and museums. Students will be introduced to the evolution of the Armenian language, to classical and modern Armenian (similarities/differences), and to Western and Eastern Armenian (similarities/differences). They will also become familiarized with the classical orthography through some original texts. The selected texts will be provided in the form of a Course Reader designed for intermediate level learning and through additional texts handed out by the instructor throughout the course. The reader will contain poems, short stories, fables and short essays. The students will be assigned to read and to analyze the texts both in oral and written forms.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CHSS108 Contemporary Issues in American Education (Credits: 3)

This course engages students in explorations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues pertaining to American education.  More specifically, students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of public educational settings in the United States.  Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the domains of the American public-school system.  Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a pluralistic society and examine the ethical responsibilities of teaching in a political democracy.  When appropriate, students will be asked to engage in comparative considerations of meanings and functions of public education in the United States and Republic of Armenia. Lecture, in-class workshops and group discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CHSS110 Introduction to Philosophy (Credits: 3)

This course aims at introducing students to some fundamental problems from various branches of philosophy: ontology, epistemology and ethics.  Questions regarding the existence of matter, God, causation, free will and other minds, the possibility of knowledge, as well as some ethical questions will be addressed during the course.  Students will read carefully selected writings from classical and modern philosophers.  Students will be asked to write short essays and participate in well-structured debates and discussions.  This course will help students develop critical and creative thinking skills, the ability to deal with uncertainty, conceptualize and theoretically analyze real life situations and problems.  Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CHSS111 Introduction to Ethics (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to major ethical theories:  virtue ethics, deontology and utilitarianism.    Students will use these frameworks to analyze ethical issues and develop their own positions to perennial problems.  Special emphasis is placed on linking philosophical discussions to topics relevant to students as learners, workers, and citizens which may include numerous aspects of personal, social, professional and political life.   Students will read carefully selected readings from classical and contemporary philosophers.  Through rigorous inclass debates and discussions, students will be challenged to consider ethical dilemmas from different perspectives and weigh the strengths and shortcomings of various ethical theories.  Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

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CHSS112 Introduction to Logic & Rhetoric (Credits: 3)

The course introduces basic laws of logic, forms of thought, strategies and devices of developing and presenting public speeches.  The course concentrates on two main questions:  1) How to reason well? 2) How to make a convincing speech or write a convincing essay?  Students are expected to read selected texts on logic and rhetoric, prepare and perform oral speeches and write essays using various strategies, logical and rhetorical techniques of argumentation.  Speeches and essays will be on various topics, for various audiences.  During the course students will also scrutinize, analyze and assess historical as well as contemporary speeches from public and political life.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS114 Introduction to Religion (Credits: 3)

The course examines religion as a phenomenon of human culture. It firstly introduces the students to the main theoretical approaches and methods through which religion has been studied by historians and social scientists. Secondly, the course looks at the major themes in the study of religion. These themes will be examined drawing on particular religious traditions and through the lens of the theoretical approaches covered. Readings will include theoretical writings about religion by classics and contemporary authors, and primary texts from various religious traditions and by representatives of those traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Its broader aim is to give the students an understanding of the richness of the religious traditions of the world, and to develop skills to analyze religious phenomena and to situate them in their historical contexts.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS125 History of the Middle East (Credits: 3)

A critical survey of the history of the Middle East from the period of Hellenism (323 BCE) to the present. The course especially focuses on the interplay of powerful political, cultural, economic and ideological forces that brought to life the formation and rise of Christianity and Islam, the millennial conflict between the Islamic and European imperialisms, interactions between the Roman-Byzantine, Iranian, Arab, and Turkic ethno-cultural worlds and political systems, westernization and transformations of the Middle East in the course of the First and Second World Wars, and the current regional sociopolitical and economic dynamics. Special attention is paid to the place of Armenia and Armenians in Middle Eastern history. This is a lecture course enhanced by students’ analysis of readings concerning main and supplementary topics. Evaluation is based on letter grading of students’ individual oral presentations, research essays, quizzes, and participation in group projects.

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CHSS127 World Civilizations I (Credits: 3)

The course explores the meaning and importance of interdisciplinary study of world history by introducing students to distinctive features and characteristics of civilizations that had developed in the Old and New worlds from the earliest times to 1700 CE. It will emphasize the importance of primary sources and of critical analysis of academic theories.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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CHSS128 History of the Modern World (Credits: 3)

A critical introductory survey of the history of the Modern World from the beginning of the Age of Great Geographic Discoveries in the 15th century to the present. The course explores especially the foundations and transformations of modern imperialism, globalization, nation state, industrializations, forms of sociopolitical and economic organization, financial capitalism, international and domestic competition and conflict, the current technological civilization and humanism, the individual and the collective from a general perspective of history of civilizations. This is a lecture course enhanced by students’ analysis of readings concerning main and supplementary topics. Evaluation is based on letter grading of students’ individual oral presentations, research essays, quizzes, and participation to group projects.

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CHSS129 Global Perspectives and Site Stories: The Path of Armenia from the Past Into the Future (Credits: 3)

This course takes a close look at the historical, cultural, political, global, and economic factors surrounding Armenia’s reemergence as an independent state in the late 20th century and its trajectory in the 21st century.   Students will become acquainted with the main events and factors shaping contemporary Armenia and analyze different interpretations of the recent and more distant past as a frame for thinking about current events and longer term scenarios for the Armenian state and nation, placing an emphasis on global and regional issues. The course will be instructor-led, supplemented by group discussion, and may include visits to cultural or historic sites as well as individual or group projects.

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CHSS130 Introduction to Art (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to the elements of art: texture, form, shape, color, line and tone/style, proportion, perspective (and for film and mobiles, time/rhythm) as aspects of an artifact, art as it is produced, and art as it is perceived.  It is also a survey in both geographic and time dimensions of art as an expression of human creativity, focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and film, while making relevant connections to other aspects of culture: music, dance, ritual, literature, religion, technology, politics, commerce (advertising), and design.  This course will introduce students to the language of art, increasing recognition and understanding of references in popular culture, on clothing, and in film and other media. Visits to museums and excursions will be included in the learning activities. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

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CHSS140 Music Appreciation (Credits: 3)

This course aims to equip students to listen to, understand and discuss music as a cultural and aesthetic form of human creativity through acquaintance with Western European classical music from various periods.  In this course students will learn to identify the basic elements of music, instruments, voice, genres, and styles, and will learn terminology used to discuss pieces of music as an art form and historical creation of a particular composer and period.   The basic underpinnings of music in physics, psychology and brain science will also be introduced.  The course requires extensive listening to music in and out of class, class discussion, and short papers on various composers and compositions.   The course may also include mandatory attendance at concerts and a short research paper or class presentation on a work or composer of the students’ choice as an individual or group project.

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CHSS141 Understanding the Twentieth Century through Music (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to give students insight into the various cultural, political, economic, social and artistic developments of the twentieth century through the study of different types of music written between 1901 and 2000. Music is an indicator and/or trigger of significant social changes of the past century. The course is focused on revealing the social and cultural circumstances at the root of musical developments, regardless of the type of music (academic, pop/rock, alternative, etc.) The course introduces a vast number of terms and ideas that have influenced both music history, as well as many other fields of modern culture and life. Special attention is paid to the formation of the music industry as a separate and potent market.  The course requires listening to music in and out of class, reading articles related to the history of music and modern history in general, engaging in class discussion, as well as writing short papers on various topics. The course may also include a research paper or class presentation as an individual or group project. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS142 Music Theory (Credits: 3)

This course aims to provide students with insight into basic understandings of elementary theory of classical music: Western notation system, musical intervals, chords and their progressions, key, scales, modality, rhythm and meter, as well as basics of classical harmony. The course is designed to enhance understanding of theoretical background of Western classical music, thus paving the way to studying more complex musical disciplines, such as Music Analysis, and Musical Composition. The students will learn both special musical terminology, and its practical use, so the connection between theory and musical practice will also be discussed. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, class discussion, reading, and a number of written assignments including theoretical exercise and basic analysis of musical samples. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS151 Intro to French Language & Culture (Credits: 3)

In this course, students will explore how French culture has been shaped by language, geography, historical events, and foreign and internal forces and groups.  We will also examine how France and the French language have played an important role in the areas of culture, arts, cinema, fashion, and cuisine. The importance of the French language and culture has waxed and waned over the centuries, depending on France’s economic, political and military importance.  French culture today is marked both by great ethnic, regional, and socio-economic diversity and by strong unifying tendencies.  Through the study of a variety of sources including media, film, literature, and visual arts, students will gain an understanding of what constitutes the “French identity” of the 21st century.

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CHSS152 Introduction to Korean Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the basics of Korean language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Korean society and economy. The course also explores Korean identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture. By the end of the course students should be familiar with simple phrases and the Korean alphabet and able to identify key Korean historic and cultural figures and events, and explain the salient features of Korean culture, its origins and evolution. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS153 Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the basics of Japanese language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Japanese society and economy.   The course also explores the Japanese identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture.  By the end of the course students should be familiar with simple phrases and the Japanese writing system and able to identify key Japanese historic and cultural figures and events, and explain the salient features of Japanese culture, its origins and evolution.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS154 Armenian Society and Culture (Credits: 3)

The course explores the development of Armenian society and culture through a comparative perspective. Topics include but are not limited to mythology, language, art, literature, education, and history. Lectures and discussion will focus on the formation of Armenian communities throughout the world; societal changes both in Armenia and within Armenian communities outside of Armenia; Armenia’s interactions with neighboring countries; and the effects and influences of social and cultural events on the formation of the identity of Armenians. Lectures and class discussions will be paired with literature referenced from ancient, medieval and contemporary scripts, legends, poems, novels, oral history, and some personal accounts of contemporaries.

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CHSS155 Introduction to Russian Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

Introduction to Russian Language & Culture explores the development of the Russian culture from historical and comparative perspectives. This course systematically covers the events, factors and figures that have shaped Russian civilization and worldview as reflected in literature, film and the arts.  The course is designed to develop critical thinking and analytical skills through class discussions and projects about Russia’s past and present situation.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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CHSS156 Introduction to Latin Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

Introduction to Latin Language & Culture aims to give students a working knowledge of Latin grammar sufficient to read basic texts and appreciate the rich literary and cultural heritage of the classical Latin tradition. Texts and culture will be considered in their historical context, with special emphasis on their continuing influence.   In addition to excerpts from original texts, students will be exposed to more extended works of history, philosophy and culture in translation, with the aim of gaining insights into the sources of Western civilization.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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CHSS157 Introduction to Italian Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course will explore the development of Italian culture in search of understanding “what makes an Italian Italian and Italy Italy.”  Students will become acquainted with the historical events, internal and external, that have played major roles in developing and shaping Italy’s social makeup, unifying its culture, socio-economic system, philosophy of life, remaking of its geographical boundaries, creations of its diversified regions with their specific foods, music, arts and architectures. Students will be exposed to some characteristics of Italian language and learn some commonly used expressions including body-language. To develop a fuller understanding of the issues, students will use a variety of sources and resources—media, film, literature, and essays.  Assessment includes papers, exams and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS158 Introduction to Turkish Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to the basics of the Turkish language, culture and history, current trends in Turkish politics, society and economy, as well as Armenian-Turkish relations. The course explores Turkey and broader Middle East through audio – visual (films, songs, speeches) and textual sources (scholarly works, news articles, policy papers, novels). By the end of the course students should be able to identify key Turkish historical and cultural figures and events, critically analyze and explain the genesis of modern Turkish politics and the impact of modernization on Turkey, and have novice level proficiency in simple Turkish.   Assessment includes tests, papers, presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS159 Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the basics of Chinese language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Chinese society and economy. The course also explores Chinese identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture. The course familiarizes students with simple phrases and the Chinese writing system as well as key figures, events and features of Chinese culture, its origins and evolution. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS160 Introduction to Arabic Language and Arab Culture (Credits: 3)

This course explores Arab culture development over the course of 1400 years. Questions addressed will be What is Arab culture? How has Arab culture developed? Who is involved? As students are learning about critical points in history—beginning in the Hijaz with pre-Islamic time and the inception of Islam and then ending in the oil era’s hyper-capitalism’s capital of Dubai, they will focus on elements of culture, like music, art, and literature, and will be exposed to Arabic. Students will examine the Arab experience in several times and places to produce informed opinions about cultural transformations. In order to gain a well-rounded view of the internal shifts and stagnations, students will read significant works of poetry, story, religious doctrine, historical journals, novels, news articles, as well as watch movies and listen to music. Assessments will be based on essays, quizzes, and presentations.

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CHSS170 Religion in America (Credits: 3)

This course aims to explore religious diversity in America since the establishment of the first European colonies. The first part of the course covers the history of religious organizations in America and the formation of American religious diversity. The second part of the course examines the religious component of sociopolitical and socioeconomic life in the contemporary United States. The third part explores various religious traditions in the American religious landscape. Readings for the course include primary sources that elucidate the development of religious diversity in the U.S. as well as analytical readings by scholars of religion. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS180 Introduction to Psychology (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of psychology and to the major topics of psychological inquiry.  Topics include theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development and examines the lifecycle of humans from infancy to old age.  An overview of current psychological theories explores topics such as types of temperament, physiological bases of behavior, life-span development, altered states of consciousness, sensation, perception, memory, thinking, motivation, emotion, personality, individual differences and stress.  The course will also include basics of experimental psychology and introductory research methods. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

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CHSS181 Introduction to Sociology (Credits: 3)

This course explores how societies function and change over time. Students will use sociological concepts and theories to analyze human behavior, social life, social policies, and social change, both in their individual lives, in their communities, and in the global community at large. Throughout the course, students will evaluate social issues and problems taking into account the dynamic relationship between individuals and society. Topics might include ethnic relations, sexism, and class bias. Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

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CHSS182 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (Credits: 3)

Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. This introductory course will review theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development.  We will examine the life cycle of man from infancy to old age.  Personality disorders, neurosis, psychoses, substance abuse and developmental disabilities will be presented.  The class will include assessment of the individual by clinical interview. The types of psychological tests that a clinical psychologist uses to assess individuals will be identified.  An overview of current treatments of emotional disturbances with medication will be presented. Discussion of relevant topics in the field of clinical psychology will include ethics, educational, industrial, sports and forensic issues. Research methods will be introduced.  The course will conclude with a review of current therapeutic modalities.

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CHSS183 Statistics for Humanities and Social Sciences (Credits: 3)

The course is designed to facilitate student learning to understand the underlying concepts and philosophy of statistics and why we use these concepts to interpret the world around us.  The course will develop skillsets to properly interpret statistical applications provided in the humanities and social sciences literature and media sources, and to critique the misuse and proper use of statistics.  Special emphasis will be placed on developing communication skills to properly explain the meaning of these findings to the general public. The course will also provide students practice with basic SPSS statistical applications using humanities/social science databases.  Basic Gaussian statistics and the development and interpretation of scales will be covered. Students will be graded by quizzes and exams, group projects, oral presentations and participation.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

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CHSS184 Social Psychology (Credits: 3)

Social psychology is the science of people, being people, around other people. This course will give students a sampling of the core theories and topics of modern social psychology, including research on conformity and obedience, altruism and aggression, attitude formation and change, and interpersonal and intergroup perception. The aim of this course is to give students understanding of how deeply human behavior is influenced by the social environment and how the scientific study of human social behavior can provide insight into the causes of, and possible cures for, a variety of current social problems. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS185 Introduction to Genocide Studies (Credits: 3)

Genocide is a crime against humanity that has occurred throughout history.  This course will focus on genocide in the 20th and 21st centuries from legal, political, sociological, psychological, cultural, ethical, ethnic, religious, economic, historical and comparative perspectives.  Special attention is paid to the Armenian Genocide, Jewish Holocaust, Rwandan Genocide, and other 20th and 21st century genocides, the Genocide Convention, the International Criminal Court, and other institutional and international responses to genocide.   Prevention, intervention, deterrence, and remedies for genocide are also covered in the course, as well as genocide education and reconciliation.   Assessment based on essays, examinations and presentations.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS186 World Regional Geography (Credits: 3)

World Regional Geography is an introduction to the discipline of geography and how the discipline makes sense of the vast complexity of cultures, economies, and environments around the world.   This course is an introductory examination of global geography using the regional geography approach which gives context by breaking down continents into smaller geographical segments that share similar qualities – economics, culture, religion, environment, language, geopolitics, defense, security, economic viability, etc. – and allows for deeper understanding and better dialogue when discussing global issues.  Upon completion, students should be able to describe variations in physical and cultural features of a region and demonstrate an understanding of their functional relationships.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS189 Gender Perspectives (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to gender as a conceptual tool. It equips the students with perspectives that will enable them to analyze the power relations that constitute what we define as “gender politics.” In this course, students will explore the major theoretical discussions within the field of women’s, gender and sexuality studies. Students will read, hear, and watch experiences and perspectives from around the globe, with a specific focus on Armenia.

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CHSS190 Armenian Heritage and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course is aimed at taking on a few broad spheres of the Armenian world. More than one instructor  will be offering multiple perspectives on the rich legacy of the nation through lectures and presentations that touch upon such topics as the origins of the Armenian people, twentieth-century Armenian history, including the Armenian Genocide, Soviet Armenia, and the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, plus other policy issue areas; an overview of the economy of the Republic of Armenia, including the role of the Diaspora in it; insights into the geography of Armenia, as well as environmental issues facing the country; and also the heritage of the Armenian Church.

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CHSS192 Introduction to Classical Cultures (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce students to a few ancient cultures conventionally deemed “classical”. Through exposure to language, literature, history, philosophy, and art, students will gain an appreciation of the lasting impact that these cultures have had on world civilization. The question of what makes the classical will act as an overall theme of the critical engagement with the elements of culture under discussion. Students will be assessed based on class participation, in-class essays, and a final paper. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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CHSS194 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Credits: 3)

This course aims to introduce students to the basic concepts, ideas, approaches, and theories in cultural anthropology. The course material embraces various cultures throughout the globe, as well as different historical periods and covers a range of topics, such as race/ethnicity, language, religion, family, gender, ritual, health, kinship, etc. During the course, students will acquire analytical tools to critically engage with these concepts and phenomena, which are taken for granted in most societies. In addition, students will become familiar with the methods of ethnographic research and will conduct fieldwork throughout the course. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS195 Introduction to Archeology (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to world archaeology emphasizing its key achievements, concepts, practices, and importance to contemporary society. The most interdisciplinary among social sciences and the humanities, current archaeology integrates in its practice approaches and methods across different fields of human knowledge: from linguistics and art history to nuclear physics, biochemistry, computer science, and environmental studies. Special attention is devoted to the distinctive role of archaeology and cultural heritage management in the present and future of the Republic of Armenia and of the Armenian Diaspora.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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CHSS196 Archaeological Excavation Practice (Credits: 4)

Students will be excavating the oldest sedentary agricultural community in the Southern Caucasus located in the Ararat plain of Armenia. The settlement named Masis Blur dates back 8000 year before present and contains remarkably well preserved architectural remains of the New Stone Age (Neolithic period), along with an abundance of stone and bone artifacts, which paint a detailed picture of vibrant life of the ancient inhabitants of the plain of Ararat. Students will have a unique opportunity to learn how to excavate mud-brick architecture, document archaeological contexts and artifacts, record scientific information, process finds in a laboratory setting, and catalogue them in a digital database. Students will have the opportunity to discover and apply their natural skills by documenting the finds through digital photography, illustration, and expand on their knowledge of statistical analysis.

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CHSS201 Comparative Education (Credits: 3)

The course explores the impact of political and cultural differences on educational systems around the world. Utilizing a comparative approach, emphasis is placed on contrasting educational systems and practice in various countries. Major themes include educational access and equity, educational reform movements, the effects of globalization on early childhood care, issues of gender and education, and social transformation in still-developing and industrialized countries. Various case studies will be examined, to provide a broader understanding of comparative research and analysis. A seminar-style learning environment characterizes this class, where alongside lectures, critical reflection on readings, student-led discussions, group presentations, and project-based collaborative work form the main teaching framework.BREAKInstructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS202 Perspectives in Education (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of some key perspectives in education, tracing the path of educational thought from early Western thinkers up to contemporary trends in progressive education, and promoting critical thinking about how people should be educated. The course introduces several major educational theories and the application of methods of historical and philosophical inquiry to examine current issues in education, including school readiness, literacy, integration, inclusiveness, diversity, and equity.  Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes,  exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS203 Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind (Credits: 3)

This course approaches mind from two points of view: psychological and philosophical, including the overlap between them.   The course explores the philosophical assumption of the existence of the mind and various religious conceptions of the soul as notions of mind.  The course starts from Descartes’s effort to establish there is a mind (at least his own, to begin with), moving to the reactions to the Cartesian views, which resonated with the scientific revolution of his time and continue to frame the discourse about mind.   Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes,  exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS204 Bioethics (Credits: 3)

Bioethics is the critical study of ethical problems arising from medicine, healthcare and the biological sciences. In this course students will discuss ethical questions surrounding topics including abortion, euthanasia, animal experimentation, health resource allocation, organ donation, medical paternalism, genetic intervention, and human cloning. Assessment may include essay writing, group participation, and quizzes/exams. Instructor-led class time.

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CHSS205 Learning, activism, and social movements (Credits: 3)

This course will explore the role of knowledge production and education in social change. The focus of the course will be on experiential, transformative, social and political learning in social movements organized with the intention of bringing about social change. As such, a rich tapestry of historical and contemporary, international and local social movements will be examined including feminist, labour, anti-poverty, environmental, global justice and indigenous ones among others, with a particular focus on theories and practices of adult learning and education in such movements. The class will be conducted in seminar-style, where alongside lectures, critical reflection on readings, student-led discussions, group presentations, and project-based collaborative work form the main teaching framework.

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CHSS206 Lens on Armenia: Photojournalism in Yerevan (1,4) (Credits: 3)

In this course students will learn digital photography as it relates to the journalistic process, documentary work and fine art. Students will examine professional photography, techniques for image capture and camera handling and works, as well as post-production methods in order to tell visual narratives. Students will create individual and group portfolios for exhibition. Assignments are designed to help students attain solid photo coverage of the topics and issues in Yerevan or throughout Armenia. Excursions in Yerevan neighborhoods and possibly to sites outside of Yerevan will help students appreciate the history and culture of Yerevan. Students should have a camera with them in class every day. Some phone cameras are sufficient.  Some cameras may be available for check out on campus on a first come first serve basis.

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CHSS210 Philosophy, Politics and Economics Seminar (Credits: 3)

This course integrates the methods of the three component disciplines of the PPE minor. Students will apply the methods, theories and concepts learnt in PPE courses to various problems or policy questions. The course aims to enable students to analyze, propose, and defend policies from philosophical, political, and economic perspectives. Students will study a selection of readings on PPE and write a paper defending a position in a specific policy area. Guest lecturers will make presentations on current policies of Armenia. Students will propose their own policy study and write a paper critically analyzing different policy options and defending a specific policy.

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Prerequisite: ECON101 OR ECON121 OR ECON122 OR ECON221 OR ECON225 OR ECON228 OR BUS112 OR ECON222 AND CHSS110 OR CHSS111 OR CHSS112 OR CHSS211 OR CHSS212 OR PSIA201 AND PSIA101 OR PSIA102 OR PSIA103 OR PSIA271 OR PSIA281 OR PSIA282 OR LAW110 OR LAW201 OR LAW142 OR LAW1

 

CHSS211 Great Books (Credits: 3)

This course will work through a few cornerstone works in the field of political writing from the Western tradition. Students will closely read original texts, as a whole or in excerpts, and participate in discussions facilitated by the instructor involving one or more of the questions raised by them. Assessment will be based on writing a number of responses, and one longer essay, including a “defence”. The class will lead to the development of close reading and close listening, as well as working through complex, ambiguous, or contradictory philosophical problems both within one given text and across the texts chosen. Some of the most enduring questions of the human experience are addressed in the chosen works, which include Plato, Machiavelli, and the Founding Fathers. This course does not presume any background in political theory or philosophy, but does expect a lot of time spent on reading.

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CHSS212 Epistemology & Philosophy of Science (Credits: 3)

This course discusses fundamental issues related to knowledge and science.  The course addresses fundamental epistemological questions such as:  What is knowledge?  Is knowledge possible?   What is truth and what are criteria of truth?  Is there a priori knowledge?  On what grounds is knowledge justified?  What is the difference between science and truth?   The course will also discuss central issues philosophy of science, such as the nature and limits of scientific knowledge, theories of scientific progress and social status of science, and differences between of natural and social sciences.    Assessment will include papers, exams and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS220 The Study of History (Credits: 3)

The course explores one singularly important question: how do we know what we think we know about human societies and ourselves from the perspective of history, which underlies the theories and philosophies of historical research. It analyzes the development of historical thinking in the course of nearly five thousand years – from the discovery of linear time in the Ancient Near East to the current research in globalization. Explorations of social and intellectual processes shaping the search for facts, construction of historical narratives, transmission of historical memory, and interpretations of the goals and meaning of history are at the core of this course. This is an interactive course consisting of instructor’s introductory lectures to the study of each specific topic and students’ proactive work with primary sources, complemented by analysis of major texts, artifacts, and concepts. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS221 Ancient Near East: History and Civilizations (Credits: 3)

A critical survey of the history and civilizations of the Ancient Near East from the earliest times to the collapse ofBREAKthe Iranian Achaemenid Empire during the conquests of Alexander of Macedon in the fourth century BCE. TheBREAKcourse explores especially the origins of human culture and foundations of civilizations, the revolutionary growthBREAKof technologies from the emergence of agriculture to the Iron Age; economies, ideologies, and authority in firstBREAKpristine states, social stratification, secondary state formation, the formation of world’s first empires and firstBREAKsteps toward globalization. Geographically it covers Egypt, the Levant, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, the ArmenianBREAKHighland, Caucasus, Iran, and the southern part of Central Asia, at the same time focusing on the diversity ofBREAKpathways in human history. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS222 Soviet Armenia (Credits: 3)

The course aims to explore the legacy of Soviet Armenia from various perspectives: political, economic, social and cultural.  The course with use sectoral as well as historical approaches to the analysis of the Soviet modernization model and its lasting impact on Armenia, through case studies and comparative analysis.    Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.  This language of instruction in this course is Armenian and uses Armenian-language course materials.

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CHSS230 Asian Art (Credits: 3)

An iconographic and aesthetic analysis of the three principal Asian religious traditions: Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic. Study of painting, sculpture and architecture as reflective of various cultures’ definitions of the Divine, life and the afterlife and value structures. Emphasis on the silk route and migration of style. Exams and final paper.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS231 Armenian Visual Traditions: Illuminated Manuscripts/Miniatures (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to the visual traditions of historical Armenia from the ancient period to the seventeenth century. The study of Armenian painting is largely a study of illuminated manuscripts, their texts, illustration and ornamentation. Students will become familiar with the methods of Medieval and Early Modern Armenian book illustration, codicology, paleography, and the history of the book as art object in the Armenian literary experience. In addition to examining individual illustrations in their original contexts, the course will consider the role of individual artists in transforming manuscript illumination without the infrastructure of traditional “schools” of painting. This course will include trips to local collections of Armenian manuscripts, including the Matenadaran where students will view and analyze manuscripts as well as other works on exhibit.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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Prerequisite:

 

CHSS232 Topics in Western Art History (Credits: 3)

This course introduces works of art and monumental architecture as complex cultural repositories from ancient civilizations of the West to the present. While exploring Western art, architecture and objects, students will gain familiarity with artists, their artworks and the historical contexts under which these works were conceived and produced. The course emphasizes close looking and visual analysis while using theories of visualization and visuality to examine the phenomena of cultural production and the consumption of a range of media. The course examines how images and objects function, and how they mediate what we see and experience. This course will provide students with the tools to accurately and describe works of art, iconography, stylistic developments, and the cultural and historical contexts of various sculptures, paintings and architecture. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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Prerequisite:

 

CHSS233 Creative Productions (Credits: 3)

Creative Production is an advanced, interdisciplinary course covering the theory, analysis and practice of producing creative works in various media. The theoretical component has two inter-related elements: (1) Articles on the theories on creativity, imagination, aesthetic emotions, (2) Works of Art (literature, film, animation, TV, fine art and photography, etc.) carefully chosen as illustrative examples of those theories. The practical component includes different creative exercises, experiences, workshops, etc., and a semester-long creative production (written work, theater monologue/duologue/scene, musical video, short film script, photo stories etc.) that students will choose to realize individually or in a team. This final production will be accompanied by a reflection paper. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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Prerequisite:

 

CHSS234 Cultural Policy and Arts Management (Credits: 3)

This course presents the theory and practice of cultural policy and arts management, models and instruments of cultural policy, specifics of international cultural relations, legal issues on international and national levels. The course explores interrelation of culture with economy, tourism, education, problems of cultural heritage protection, museum and art gallery management.  Other topics include different types of governmental support for culture, public-private partnership, community and civil society role, public relations in cultural institutions and projects, and engagement of media industry and information technologies for promoting culture and art.BREAKInstructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes,  exams, projects and presentations.

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Prerequisite:

 

CHSS235 Women/Gender and the Visual Arts (Credits: 3)

Western artistic production and criticism has been monopolized by male heterosexual spectatorship. The result has been an artistic tradition beset with gendered perceptions and a discourse whose objective is to regulate and marginalize the voices of “others.” It is therefore necessary to reread the texts and look afresh at art to expose the fallacies. Topics to be discussed include: mythmaking, the formulation of sexual ideals of beauty, spectatorship and the gaze, feminist theory, gay studies, naked/nude, and constructs of pornography. Exams and papers foster a critical mindset and a sensitivity to biases latent within the realm of art.  Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS236 Baroque Era (Credits: 3)

This course aims to explore the developments in Europe during the Enlightenment through the lens of the aesthetic category of the Baroque.   The course examines the distinctive characteristics of the cultural, social and political spheres in the Baroque era, their interdependence, and their continuing relevance.  Through close analysis of texts, political, music, painting, architecture, and intellectual history, students will develop critical thinking skills, the ability to distinguish aesthetic eras and draw parallels across disciplines, and learn to view cultures from different perspectives, while gaining knowledge that will enable life-long learning and enrich their appreciation of the lasting legacy of the Baroque.  Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS237 20th Century Art (Credits: 3)

20th Century Art is a survey of major fine art developments in Europe and the United States from post-impressionism to post-modernism. Media discussed include painting, sculpture and architecture. Assessment may include tests, short assignments and longer papers with focuses on theoretical and critical approaches to the analysis of art. Instructor-led class time and may include off-campus excursions.

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Prerequisite:

 

CHSS238 Psychology of Gender (Credits: 3)

The course explores the major theories and central argument in gender studies and human development, and addresses the impact of socio-economic, political, cultural and psychological forces on the development and reinforcement of gender discourse and practice. Students will explore the process of gender socialization and formation of gender roles to unearth why and how social norms, expectations and opportunities are related to gender, and how they affect the experience of gender throughout a person’s life.

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CHSS240 Music & Literature (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to give students insight into the various cultural, political, economic, social and artistic developments of the twentieth century through the study of different types of music written between 1901 and 2000. Music is an indicator and/or trigger of significant social changes of the past century. The course is focused on revealing the social and cultural circumstances at the root of musical developments, regardless of the type of music (academic, pop/rock, alternative, etc.) The course introduces a vast number of terms and ideas that have influenced both music history, as well as many other fields of modern culture and life. Special attention is paid to the formation of the music industry as a separate and potent market. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, reading articles related to the history of music and modern history in general, engaging in class discussion, as well as writing short papers on various topics. The course may also include a research paper or class presentation as an individual or group project. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS251 Topics in Cinema (Credits: 3)

Cinema is a “universal language”, a multidimensional medium for telling stories and portraying reality from different perspectives to large, diverse and often dispersed audiences through sight and sound. Topics in Cinema examines a wide range of subjects in global cinema relating to both the artistry and socio-cultural significance of movies. The course will explore such topics as genre, international cinema, film criticism, and the role of film in society as it touches on such subjects as cultural identity, history, race and gender, and societal change. Instructor-led film viewing and discussion, along with reading and writing assignments.

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CHSS255 Russian Professional Communication (Credits: 3)

This course is designed for those who would like to feel confident using Russian language in professional life. This course focuses on developing oral and written skills in the business setting and emphasizes memo writing, business letters, publicity, oral reporting, interviewing and professional presentations. Special attention is given to intercultural communication. Through observing, simulating and experiencing incidents of cross-cultural communication, students will begin to examine and develop skills that are necessary for effective production of oral and written texts and for successful intercultural communication among Russians and achieve a high level of language proficiency in Russian language.  Assessment includes papers, written and oral presentations, exams.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

 

CHSS256 Latin Language & Literature (Credits: 3)

This course aims to deepen the knowledge and understanding of Latin language and literature and their role in the evolution of European culture and society.   Students will acquire a higher level of Latin reading knowledge through study of excerpts from original texts. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between Latin and English (vocabulary, phraseology and syntax).   The course will involve study and research of Medieval European societies, culture, religion (Christianity), education, literature, philosophy and architecture.   Assessment will include exams, papers, and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CHSS156

 

CHSS261 Armenian Literature in Perspective (Credits: 3)

This course exposes students to a variety of texts by Armenian and non-Armenian writers focusing on a specific historical period. Students will study the literary values of these texts to gain an understanding of how literary texts construct and reflect the collective imagination of that period. In this respect, the course discusses literary texts as the materialized aspirations of their authors on the one hand, and as the collective dream of a community on the other hand.  The particular historical period will change each semester. BREAKBREAKThe course is based on a semester-long student research project. In the beginning of the semester, each student chooses a cultural issue that he/she is interested in.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND103

 

CHSS262 Russian Language & Literature (Credits: 3)

This course, to be taught in Russian, is designed to introduce students to selected masterpieces of Russian literature and to improve their ability to read complex written works. Through understanding the biographical and historical context, main ideas, aesthetic principles and literary techniques of the most prominent Russian writers, students will develop research, writing and discussion skills that will be transferable to various disciplines and professions. Assessment will include papers, essay, exams and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

 

CHSS272 Comparative Religion (Credits: 3)

The course examines world religious traditions from a comparative perspective. Students will be introduced to the basic tenets, worldview, and practices of the major religious traditions around the world, polytheistic traditions, Asian religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, as well as new religious movements. The course will also examine the sacred texts of various religions.  Upon completing the course, students should be familiar with the key beliefs and practices of the major religions and gain an appreciation of the diversity of religious experience through time and across cultures. The course also aims to equip students with concepts and frames for thinking critically about the relationship of Christianity to other religious traditions and comparing the dogmatic, doctrinal and ritualistic practices within various religious traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS280 Clinical Psychology (Credits: 3)

Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. This course will review theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development.  We will examine the life cycle of man from infancy to old age.  Personality disorders, neurosis, psychoses, substance abuse and developmental disabilities will be presented.  The class will include assessment of the individual by clinical interview. The types of psychological tests that a clinical psychologist uses to assess individuals will be identified.  An overview of current treatments of emotional disturbances with medication will be presented. Discussion of relevant topics in the field of clinical psychology will include ethics, educational, industrial, sports and forensic issues. Research methods will be introduced.  The course will conclude with a review of current therapeutic modalities. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

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CHSS281 Human Development & Personality (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of the major theories and topics in human development and to the major topics in personality formation. Topics include theories on normal human growth and the human lifecycle from infancy to old age, with special attention to learning, temperament, personality. Special attention will be paid to childhood development.   Upon completing the course, student should gain an understanding of how human thinking, learning, and physical abilities vary and evolve at different ages and stages, and how these various aspects of development influence one another.  Assessment includes tests, paper, case studies and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

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CHSS282 Trade (Credits: 3)

This course examines the international trade system and the economic concepts and political institutions upon which it is based. Topics covered include a brief history of the development of trade, players and processes involved in trade, the role of trade in development, trade policy and politics, comparative and competitive advantages of nations, gains and losses from trade, international trade negotiations, and effects of regionalization and globalization. The course has an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on case-studies, theory and empirical studies. Students will be expected to make individual and group presentations and engage in case-study analysis in discussion. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS285 Genocide Studies and Human Rights Seminar (Credits: 3)

This upper-level interdisciplinary course explores in-depth one or more themes the phenomenon of genocide as a gross violation of human rights through class discussion, research and presentations.   Themes may include genocide prevention and education, genocide reparations and remedies, genocide interventions and righteous/rescuers, and will vary from year to year.  Assessment based on class preparation, contribution to class discussion, final presentation. BREAKThree hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS290 Cultural Geography (Credits: 3)

This course is an interdisciplinary course that uses cultural habitats as a window on how individuals and groups develop their societies and way of life, coexisting with neighbors and shaping and being shaped by their environment.  Geographers study ‘culture’ to understand the ways in which culture is constructed, maintained, diffused, and sometimes contested within space and place.  The diversity of human culture is embedded in our shared geographies and is used as a force of inclusion, exclusion, and power.  This course examines the varied perspectives and processes that shape our everyday experiences and seeks to raise awareness of the plurality of cultural landscapes.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CHSS291 Modernism (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to develop students’ skills in analysis, critical thinking, and communication. From 1890-1950 the western world went through a profound transformation that involved industrialization, two world wars, the erosion of colonialism, the rise of psychology, Fascism, Communism, and other massive historical events. At the same time, there was an explosion of innovative literary and artistic output to make sense of all these intense changes: it became a movement known as Modernism. In this course students will engage with various modernist texts which may include poetry, fiction, essays, and also art, films, and music. They will be expected to keep a reading journal and/or write in-class responses to readings. Students will be required to participate in class discussions and give one presentation to the class. There will be a mid-term exam, final exam, quizzes, as well as written assignments. Three hours of instructor-led discussions per week, along with in-class and take home assignments.

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Prerequisite:

 

CHSS292 Gender and Social Change (Credits: 3)

This course is an interdisciplinary women’s studies course with a global perspective, covering various theoretical and empirical approaches from the humanities and social sciences and political, economic and cultural perspectives.  The course explores the dynamic ways in which gender is defined and evolves, as a social institution, and how those definitions affect power relations in society, including issues of class, race, ethnicity, and politics, and the impact of gender equality on development outcomes. The course will also take a comparative perspective, looking the local situation in an effort to understanding the role of women in the family and society. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes,  exams, projects and presentations.

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CHSS293 Armenian Studies (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the Armenian Studies as an interdisciplinary subject, including sources and artifacts of Armenian history and culture, research methods, digital and other resources.   Topics include ancient and modern written sources, secondary sources, schools of thought, comparative and historical approaches to literature, art, music, and other aspects of Armenian studies.  This course will be taught in Armenian.   Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes,  exams, projects and presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

 

CHSS298 Independent Study (Credits: 3)

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CHSS380 Introduction to Translation Studies (Credits: 3)

The aim of this course is to introduce students to critical discussions in translation studies and to help them develop a language (vocabulary) and discourse (manner) for analyzing translations as well as contextualize and evaluate translations in a constructive manner. Students are encouraged to view translation as a process, involving planning, drafting, and revision for clarity and precision. They are required to complete short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not limited to response papers, vocabulary journals, and translations from a range of texts from across the disciplines.

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CHSS381 History and Theories of Translation (Credits: 3)

This course aims to investigate the history of translation and the theories that have accompanied the changing roles of translation in the societies where they have been put into practice. Translation is viewed here as a factor that has contributed to shifts in intellectual, literary and cultural trends. This course also examines the main theoretical concepts currently discussed in translation studies, and demonstrates how they influence translation in practice. By taking a discourse and intercultural studies approach, rather than a purely linguistic approach, this course explores the impact of translation as a force for change and trace the ways in which texts are received by readers in different cultural contexts.

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CHSS382 Practicum in Translation (Credits: 3)

The practicum component aims to consolidate the theory and practice of translation covered in the previous courses. The course helps student translators develop and expand their own translating and editing techniques, and to facilitate the integration of their skills and knowledge through largescale practice. It enables students to translate a wide variety of genres in professional areas (literary, medicine, law, business, etc.) so that they can make informed choices about their own professional future. Students are guided through their apprenticeship in stages—observation, controlled practice of translation techniques, and increasingly difficult and lengthy texts. Throughout the practicum, students receive constructive feedback and assistance and evaluate peer performance.

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CHSS383 Consecutive & Simultaneous Interpreting (Credits: 3)

Consecutive and Simultaneous Interpreting is a course grounded in theory and practice and specifically set up to train professional interpreters. The course offers students an opportunity to get acquainted with the theoretical and professional frameworks of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting. Students will learn to interpret in various professional areas such as literature, medicine, law, business, etc. Worksite learning is a key component of the course during which students will perform live interpreting tasks under supervision and shadow professional interpreters at work.

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EC103 Introduction to Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of the structural, biological, and historical aspects of language and focuses on the socio-cultural aspect—the connections between language and culture, and the ways in which language is used in various cultural and social contexts.  Examples of regional variation, social variation, ethnicity, gender, age, style, register, and the status of the speaker’s language will be discussed and illustrated during the course. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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EC104 Introduction to Communications (Credits: 3)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of communication studies. Students will examine the components of human communication as it takes place within interpersonal, group, organizational, and public contexts and become familiar with the historical development of mass media and its role in society, looking at the print and electronic news media, advertising, public relations, and the Internet.  Students will also explore developments in the theory of communication from the mid20th century to the present.  They will apply theoretical models to critically assess contemporary means and patterns of communication and use these models to analyze and develop their own written and oral communication in different formats. Course work will include media and reading assignments, as well as case studies and oral and written projects.  Three hours of instructorled class time per week.

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EC105 Introduction to the Structure of English (Credits: 3)

This course is a systematic introduction to the structure of the English language. Students will acquire knowledge of the morphology, syntax, and phonology of contemporary English. They will explore the interrelation of form, meaning, and use and apply linguistic knowledge in the analysis of their own and others’ communication. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and home tasks in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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EC120 American Literature I (Credits: 3)

This survey course introduces students to American literature from the beginning of European contact to the present, focusing on major authors and different literary genres. It examines the historical influences on the evolution of this body of literature and the construction of a distinct and complex American identity. Through close reading, class discussion and their own research and writing, students will explore how themes such as gender, race, class, spirituality, economics, and the environment play a role in the formation and evolution of the American experience.

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EC121 English Literature I (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to English literature from the Elizabethan period through the twentieth century and focuses on the development of various literary genres, as well as on the works of the most significant literary figures. The class will cover the major literary movements from English Renaissance humanism to Postmodernity and may also include marginal literary voices and ephemeral literature from English letters to provide context and balance.    Students are required to write analytical essays and complete weekly reading assignments. Three hours of instructorled class time per week including discussions and tasks.

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EC125 Introduction to Acting Techniques (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the process of building a character and interacting on stage using movement, voice, and imagination. Throughout the course, students will explore techniques of improvisation and scene study, and develop the basic skills of the acting process. They will become familiar with the history and theory of the craft of acting, and apply relevant concepts and practices to critically analyze their own work and that of others. Coursework will include reading assignments, written critiques and reflections, and performance-based projects.

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EC130 Introduction to Journalism (Credits: 3)

This course examines the nature of journalism as an area of mass media, its history and role in creating public opinion and disseminating information, and the impact of technology on journalism today. Students will be introduced to the meaning of “news” definition, qualities of, evaluation and selection, and channels and audiences for news. The theoretical part of the course is paired with the actual practice of journalism: reporting (gathering information), exploring news values, news styles, form and organization of news stories, and writing various types of news: hard news, features, interviews, and critiques.  Students will be required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND101 AND FND102

 

EC140 Expository Writing (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to develop students’ writing skills for use in a wide array of academic and professional contexts.  Students will become familiar with the linguistic and rhetorical features of different genres of objective and informational writing, critically analyzing samples of effective writing in order to use them as models for their own work.  They will be encouraged to view writing as a process, involving planning, drafting, and revision for clarity and precision. Students are required to complete short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not necessarily limited to summaries, reports, memos, narratives, expository analyses, and syntheses. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, along with inclass and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND101 AND FND102

 

EC141 Persuasive Writing (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to develop students’ persuasive writing skills for use in a wide array of academic and professional contexts. Students will become familiar with the structural and   rhetorical features of formulating and communicating arguments in a persuasive manner, taking into consideration such factors as audience, reasoning, evidence, and style. They will be encouraged to view writing as a process, involving planning, drafting, and revision for clarity and precision. Students are required to complete short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not limited to persuasive essays, letters, reviews, and proposals.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND101 AND FND102

 

EC151 Consecutive and Simultaneous Interpreting (Credits: 3)

This course introduces the theory, research, and practice of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting.  It focuses on the practical techniques and skills of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting from English into Armenian and from Armenian into English within a variety of professional areas and for a range of purposes. The course also aims at furthering students’ command of both Armenian and English through interpreting exercises and thematic glossaries. Students are expected to complete weekly readings and other home assignments and be prepared for in-class discussions, tasks, and interpretation practice. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102 AND FND104

 

EC200 Introduction to Discourse Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the study of discourse through hands-on analysis of real language in use, taking into account the linguistic features and functions of spoken, written, and multi-modal communication as well as the social, cultural, and political contexts in which it occurs. We will explore how meaning is created and relationships are enacted within and across an array of genres and use this knowledge to interpret and construct texts within different social and professional contexts. Course work will include reading assignments, written analyses, and practical application. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC105 OR EC103

 

EC215 Acting Techniques II (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the process of characterization and interaction practicing them in different styles. Throughout the course, students will explore techniques of improvisation and interpretation of a scene. Through exploration of theatre approaches, they will apply the concepts and practices to do a theoretical and practical interpretation of their own work developing skills of the acting process Coursework will include reading assignments, written interpretation, and performance-based projects. Acting for film is part of the syllabus and includes monologues shot on the phone. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102 AND EC125

 

EC222 World Literature 2 (Credits: 3)

This world literature course is designed to engage students in critical analysis of significant literary texts from around the world. The aim is to explore perspectives on society and culture through the study of writers from diverse backgrounds working in various literary genres. Possible themes may include transnationalism, moral ambiguities across cultures, the transition from colonial to postcolonial, or the nature of translation.    Through discussions and written assignments, students will improve their critical thinking, analytical writing, and oral communication skills. All texts will be read in English translation.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC120 OR EC121

 

EC225 Short Fiction (Credits: 3)

This course explores short fiction from major world literary figures, further developing students’ knowledge of and ability to read and analyze literature.  Students will engage in close reading of the texts and consider form and content in relation to the historical context and the relevant literary and philosophical movement(s) of the time,  addressing issues such as tradition, modernity, conflict, war, injustice and freedom.  The course aims to deepen students’ skills in interpreting texts with awareness of the texts’ basic orientation in the world (historical, philosophical, religious, linguistic, etc.); constructing arguments and evaluating canons using appropriate evidence and tools of critical analysis; and developing an appreciation of the fundamental ambiguities and complexities involved in all human attempts to answer questions about life. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC121 OR EC120

 

EC226 Speculative Fiction: Science Fiction, Fantasy and the Fantastic (Credits: 3)

This course explores the genre of speculative fiction, which encompasses science fiction, fantasy fiction, and the fantastic (or horror), and spans counter-culture and mainstream works from ancient Greece to the present day.  Through close reading and interdisciplinary analysis students will develop an in-depth understanding of the genre and the issues—science and technology, the supernatural, human nature, and human consciousness, among others—that it aims to address.   Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC120 OR EC121

 

EC227 Modern Poetry (Credits: 3)

The unprecedented devastation and upheaval the world witnessed between 1890 and 1960 prompted Western writers to question accepted cultural, literary and artistic norms and to produce radically experimental works of art and new understandings of what it means to live in modern times. Modernist poetry arose during this time, profoundly reflecting the changes that continue to shape our lives to this day. In this course, students will engage with the work of various modern poets while also gaining a theoretical understanding of poetics and twentieth-century literature. They will develop skills in analysis, creativity, critical thinking, and communication. Instructor-led discussion, along with in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC120 AND EC121

 

EC228 Children’s Literature (Credits: 3)

Children’s literature plays an important role in the transmission of cultural values from one generation to the next. In this course, students will critically analyze a range of children’s literature and also create a work of their own.  Students will read folk and fairy tales from different cultures and a variety of children’s books, and analyze selected pieces based on psychological and social studies of childhood and the influence of literature on the development of children.  Students will engage in research on some aspect of child development vis-à-vis exposure to fairy tales, folk tales, or books, and produce a complete (text and pictures) book for children. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC121 OR EC120

 

EC229 The Graphic Novel (Credits: 3)

This course combines cultural and political approaches to investigate one of the most influential and rapidly growing forms of literature: comics. Popular, yet historically considered lowbrow, graphic novels are now critically recognized as an important form in the creative arts. This course reflects an interdisciplinary approach to knowledge, combining visual arts, journalism, fiction and memoire. Students will develop the critical skills necessary to read, understand, write and produce graphic narratives. They will explore works that define the genre while illustrating a variety of artistic and storytelling approaches to contemporary cultural and political themes, and selections from comic history and graphic narrative theory. Instructor led lectures and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC121 OR EC120

 

EC231 Public Speaking (Credits: 3)

This course aims to develop students’ speaking skills for a variety of public and professional situations.  Students will explore fundamental principles and practice of public oratory with an emphasis on all phases of communication: conception, design, organization, research, writing, rehearsal, and delivery.  Students will gain skills and confidence in conveying and modulating message and meaning in different registers through formal and extemporaneous public speeches, expository/informative and persuasive presentations for public meetings and conferences, and other speaking tasks. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, plus in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102

 

EC232 Public Relations (Credits: 3)

This course explores the role of the public relations practitioner as a specialist in both internal and external communication, an analyst of public opinion, and a counselor to administrators and corporate leaders. It examines the theories and practices of public relations and provides students with opportunities to implement their skills and knowledge in authentic tasks, including developing a public relation plan, designing activities and events aimed at managing an organization’s reputation, and working with the media.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and in-class and home tasks to acquire knowledge of the topics covered in class. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC233 Professional Communication (Credits: 3)

Effective written and spoken communication is a core competency for professional and public life.   This course is designed to give students a comprehensive view of the scope and importance of professional communication in a variety of settings.  It aims to develop students’ writing, speaking, and interpersonal skills and specific tools for communicating in complex environments and accomplishing strategic academic and professional goals.  Students will refine communication skills necessary for internships and permanent workplace positions.  More specifically, students will gain skills in writing letters, emails, resumes, proposals, formal and informal reports, agendas, and work plans with an awareness of succinct written expression necessary for professional communication.  Students will develop informative, persuasive, and extemporaneous oral skills for networking, telephone, Internet-based and face-to-face interviews, and presentations.  Because effective group communication is a necessity in today’s workplace, students will learn and practice skills in managing meetings, dealing with conflict, and leveraging the power of diversity, at both the individual and cultural level.  Students are required to complete weekly assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the topics discussed in class.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, plus in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC141 OR EC140

 

EC234 Advertising (Credits: 3)

Advertising and marketing communications are a pervasive presence in modern life and an essential skill for communications professionals.   This course explores the principles and practices of advertising and its role within marketing communications.  Students will develop a critical understanding of how advertising functions in global and local contexts and become familiar with the components of the advertising process, including market research, media planning, and creative strategies. They will learn how to identify the target audience, determine which medium or combinations of media provide the best means to reach it, and create effective messages.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and in-class and home tasks to acquire the knowledge of the topics covered in class. Three-hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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Prerequisite:

 

EC235 Communications Ethics (Credits: 3)

In a continuously connected world, communication has taken on a pervasive role in our lives, raising a new range of ethical issues for communications professionals and non-professionals alike.  This course examines ethical and legal aspects of human communication as it takes place within interpersonal and public contexts. Students will be introduced to basic theories of ethics and then guided through current controversies relating to such topics as privacy, freedom of speech, censorship, the right to be informed, and propaganda.  They will explore theoretical ethical issues connected with the acquisition, storing and sharing of information and become familiar with relevant Armenian legal codes.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC236 Survey/Polling Methodology (Credits: 3)

Decision making in the fields of mass communication, marketing, and public relations relies on the ability to conduct research and critically interpret data. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of survey research, thus advancing their understanding and skills in social science research methodologies. Students will learn how to understand and critically analyze data and results from survey research and public opinion polls. They will also learn how to collect, analyze and interpret original survey data. Students will be required to complete weekly reading assignments to acquire knowledge and practice skills covered in class. They will also conduct individual or group projects including fieldwork, written assignments, and oral presentations. Three hours of instructor-led discussions/class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC237 Introduction to Filmmaking (Credits: 3)

Film is the medium of our age, combining audio, visual, symbolic and narrative elements to produce impactful messages.   This course is designed to empower students with the ability to express themselves and communicate effectively in the medium of film, providing them with an understanding of how and why films are made. Students will learn the core principles and techniques of filmmaking, both in theory and practice. The course will combine discussions on the history, language, forms and functions of film with hands-on technical instruction in developing projects from start to finish (planning, shooting, editing). Students will collaborate in teams to create short films focusing on specific skills and concepts. They will complete written assignments, and view and critique a selection of films and each other’s work in class.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC238 Media & Society (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon Introduction to Communications (EC104) and explores historical and contemporary issues in the interaction between media and society. Students will examine and develop critical perspectives on mediaBREAKand the interplay between media institutions, media content, and culture. The course will introduce major theories used in analyzing media and its effects, as well as examine the characteristics of individual media: newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, film, the Internet, and social media. The core concepts of media ethics will also be discussed. Course work will include media and reading assignments, as well as collaborative media projects. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC104

 

EC239 Campaigning for a Cause (Credits: 3)

Campaigning is an increasingly widespread form of public relations and communications in the networked age applicable well beyond the political sphere.  This course is designed to guide students through the entire chain of a successful campaign in a range of sphere, including but not limited to polishing the idea (clear understanding of the cause and its importance), strategizing and planning (a step-by-step roadmap towards achieving the goal), targeting the right audience, and developing the message through analysis and research. The course will incorporate elements of communication, fundraising, and grassroots advocacy, including the use of crowd-funding and social media.  Students will explore the basic principles of successful campaigns, analyze case studies of local and international campaigns, and develop the practical skills necessary to plan and conduct successful campaigns. Students will be required to complete weekly readings and other home assignments and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC240 Creative Writing (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to develop students’ writing skills by exploring various creative genres (poetry, fiction, playwriting, nonfiction, memoir, etc). Students will become familiar with literary forms, styles, and traditions, critically analyzing samples in order to improve their own work. The core of this course is based on original student writing, therefore students will be required to submit short work on a weekly basis, depending on the genre and focus. They will be encouraged to view writing as a creative process, involving honest exploration of ideas and the imagination. They will practice free-writing, drafting, and revision for clarity, precision, and literary effect. Students will also be required to actively participate during each class, discussing assigned texts and other students’ writings. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, along with in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 OR EC141

 

EC242 Technical Writing (Credits: 3)

This advanced writing course is aimed at building the skills needed to produce clear and effective technical and scientific writing in areas that may include but are not limited to computer science, earth science, engineering, business, finance, and medicine. Students will learn how to follow conventions of technical writing for whichever purpose they write, such as proposals, manuals, scientific reports, and technical documents. Regular assignments include readings, analyzing and critiquing sample papers, collecting and researching information and data, drafting, self- and peer revision. Students are required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class and integrate them into their own writing. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 AND EC141

 

EC243 The Practice & Art of Non-Fiction (Credits: 3)

Non-fiction is a diverse genre of writing that is in high demand in almost all spheres.   This writing skills course aims to familiarize students with various forms of non-fiction (memoir, feature writing, grant proposals, in-depth reviews, photo-essays, blogging, essays on art or culture, journalism, etc.). Texts will be read closely and analyzed in order to gain a wide breadth of knowledge about craft and style. Students will be encouraged to view writing as an analytical, ethical and creative process, involving the exploration of ideas, information, and facts. They will write in class, produce longer essays, and also conduct outside research. Students will practice free-writing and drafting, followed by revising for clarity, precision, and effect. They will also be required to actively participate during each class, discussing assigned texts and other students’ writing. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, along with in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 OR EC141

 

EC244 Writing for Media (Credits: 3)

Working in media today demands flexibility, creativity, and critical awareness of the art and practice of writing in an ever-changing media environment. This course builds upon students’ basic writing skills by developing the skills used in writing for different media, with an emphasis on reporting, public relations, advertising, and professional communication. Students will explore theory and practice in writing for print, television, radio, and the internet, including traditional websites as well as blogs, social media, and other new media. They will analyze content, style, format, and other features of writing, and apply their understandings to their own written production. Students are required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class and integrate them into their own writing. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 AND EC141

 

EC245 Writing for Tourism, Culture and Country Promotion (Credits: 3)

This advanced writing course aims to bring genre, style and content into focus.  The ability to produce tailored texts and messages for special purposes, audiences and fields is one of the most highly sought skill sets in the field of communication.   It takes a combination of content knowledge, linguistic facility, audience sensitivity, and institutional knowledge.   Students will learn how to analyze specialized discourse in order to develop their own skills for specific fields, including tools and resources, preparation and authentication of terms of art.   Themes may include touristic writing and economic, political and cultural fields.   Course content themes will vary from term to term and be tailored to instructor and student interest.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC141 AND EC140

 

EC246 Business Journalism (Credits: 3)

Business writing is a branch of journalism that explains and analyzes the financial and business activities in an economy.  In this course, students will write about global and local firms in a number of sectors, including the technology, alternative energy, manufacturing, and service sectors that shape a country’s economy.  Students will explore various research, interviewing, and data collection strategies, and learn to weigh and evaluate evidence in financial reports and synthesize existing scholarship and data to write articles about the economy and its firms in creative and cogent ways, situating business issues in their broader context. They will also read and critique business articles from leading financial publications. Instructor-led discussions with reading and writing assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 or BUS177

 

EC250 Introduction to Translation (Credits: 3)

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the field of translation and the basic skills necessary to begin translating texts from English to Armenian and Armenian to English. Students will become familiar with the major practical and theoretical approaches and methods to translation. They will be encouraged to view translation as a process, involving planning, drafting, and revision for clarity and precision. Students are required to complete short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not limited to response papers, vocabulary journals, and translations from a range of texts from various disciplines. Three hours of instructor-led discussions per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 AND EC141

 

EC253 Literary Translation (Credits: 3)

This course familiarizes students with the history, theory and practice of literary translation. Students are encouraged to view translation as a creative process similar to that of creative writing. The aim of the course is to help students cultivate general translation techniques while focusing specifically on stylistic and semantic creativity in a workshop setting. Assignments include short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not limited to response papers, vocabulary journals, and translations from a range of texts from different literary genres. Knowledge of Armenian is required. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including lecture, seminar, workshop discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND104 AND EC250 OR EC240

 

EC260 Negotiation (Credits: 3)

Almost every interaction of daily life involves some kind of negotiation process, thus negotiation is broadly conceived to be a form of communicative activity encompassing business, professional and personal life.     This course aims to develop students’ negotiation and persuasion skills by introducing them to new paradigms for collaborative problem solving,  starting with when and why people negotiate  After presenting different styles and models of negotiation, the course considers the effectiveness of each and teaches   tools and frameworks to better prepare for negotiation; e.g., an understanding of the different elements at play, awareness of trust and relationship-building dynamics, modes of persuasion, active listening skills, and strategic thinking and analysis skills.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, plus in-class and take-home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC261 World Media (Credits: 3)

This interdisciplinary course explores how media have transcended national boundaries and created new cultural spaces with their own rules, perspectives and values.   It looks at how world media, including news and entertainment, have created and serve global audiences and are  being used to promote economic and geopolitical goals.   Special attention will be paid to how world media contribute to a country’s soft power and the kinds of media that have been employed, with commercial success, as vehicles for country branding and promotion.   Topics will include the role of digital communities and diasporas in these multipronged media initiatives, as well as the blurring of the lines between viewers and consumers, artists and producers, information and entertainment, news and advertising, politics and popular culture.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Student performance will be assessed through individual and/or group written and oral presentations, case studies and/or essays.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102 AND EC103 OR EC104 OR EC125 OR EC130 OR EC222 OR EC234 OR EC237 OR EC238 OR LAW160 OR CHSS151 OR CHSS152 OR CHSS153 OR CHSS155 OR CHSS156 OR CHSS192 OR CHSS190 OR CHSS140 OR CHSS141 OR CHSS181 OR CHSS240 OR CHSS251 OR PSIA281 OR CHSS290

 

EC262 Filmmaking 2 (Credits: 3)

Students will build upon the visual storytelling techniques they learned in Introduction to Filmmaking. In addition to further exploration of cinematic grammar, narrative structure, theory and history, they will study the art of the documentary and the specific techniques and approaches to applying their storytelling skills to a non-fiction format. During the course students will conceive and complete a long-form fiction or documentary project. Students will develop their ideas from treatment to screenplay and then work collaboratively in crews to realize their projects, expanding their knowledge and experience in every phase of production. Each student will be required to critique and explain their own and each other’s work in classroom discussions and written assignments.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC237

 

EC263 Opinion Making in the Age of New Media (Credits: 3)

This course examines the nature of modern journalism as a practical tool for influencing and shaping public opinion. Moving beyond traditional journalism, it will explore such genres as talk shows, political satire, multimedia journalism, and social media, examining cases from both Armenian and world media to develop an understanding of how various media mechanisms function and how they can be effectively employed. Students will explore case studies and specific examples from Armenia and abroad to analyze how public discourse can be shaped, shifted, and focused on issues of importance, with attention to how political satire is used to influence public opinion and conduct of public officials.  They will learn to detect bias in media and attempts to manipulate public opinion and explore new tools to identify impact, ranging from statistical methods to psychological and physiological/brain activity monitoring. Throughout the course, students will undertake public relations and journalism projects, applying the methods and tools they have learned.   They will be required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments, case studies, and media projects.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238 AND EC130

 

EC264 Public Relations Campaigns (Credits: 3)

In this skills-based course students explore the strategic management of public relations through analyzing and developing campaigns and projects. They will create strategic proposals and tailor their writing for various purposes and text-types, developing practical, analytical, and creative skills needed for careers in PR.   Students will have the opportunity to build a professional portfolio and take part in other professional activities. They may also have the opportunity of job shadowing and site visit opportunities, to observe and collect information from professionals on the job. Besides the instruction led meetings there will be job shadowing and site visit opportunities for the students to observe and collect information from professionals on the job. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC265 The Language of Film (Credits: 3)

Cinema has evolved a complex system of conventions to tell stories and communicate ideas. This revolutionary and unique system of recording and assembling images and sound has been compared to language, involving a kind of cinematic “grammar”. In this course, students will learn to study cinema from a critical perspective. They will view a broad selection of films from a variety of genres to explore how motion pictures are designed to express meaning, and to analyze and relate their content and form. Students will complete written assignments as well as readings on filmmaking, film history, theory, and criticism.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC268 Photography (Credits: 3)

Photography is a fundamental element of today’s digital media. This course introduces the practical techniques and aesthetic principles of still photography and explores different genres of photography and their uses. The course aims to develop an understanding of such aspects of photography as depth of field, composition, motion blur, and visual storytelling through both critical analysis and hands-on shooting and editing exercises. The course will also include such topics as the history of photography and the role it plays in the changing media landscape.  Instructor-led discussion and workshops, with reading, writing, and photographic assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC269 Visual Communication (Credits: 3)

This course explores the principles of visual communication and the fundamental rules that govern our interaction with information in forms that can be read or seen. It provides students with theoretical and practical skills for working with various forms of visual presentation, affording them the ability to relate the concepts of design to the physical world (buildings, art, landscapes, etc.), to the world of ideas (how design influences our thinking and thought processes), and to the world of imagination (how we think of design, and how to apply this creatively). The course will also address such topics as the history of visual communications, the development of writing systems, artistic movements, typography, calligraphy, and poster design. Students will apply course concepts in written analyses and graphic design projects.  Instructor led discussion.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC104

 

EC270 Media and Politics (Credits: 3)

This course examines the complex relations between media and political systems, exploring the role of the media in politics and its links with political institutions, processes and actors. Students will apply theoretical understandings in the critical analysis of political communication, journalism, and new media, as they study both global trends and local realities.  Instructor-led lectures and discussions, with coursework including theoretical analysis, case studies, and practical application.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC104

 

EC280 Oral History: Collecting Life Stories (Credits: 3)

“Memory is living history, the remembered past that exists in the present” (Frisch, 1990, p. xxiii). BREAKMemory work, through the medium of oral history, offers the opportunity to examine the connections between public and personal history, marginalized lives and silences. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of oral history, critically examining ethical considerations, memory work, oral evidence, interpretive conflict, and “sharing authority” in researcher and participant relationships. Leading students to complete oral history projects of their own, various forms of outputs will also be discussed including life story narratives, archival documentation, co-narrating with participants, public pedagogy, advocacy, and research creation projects. Alongside instructor-led lectures students will engage in close readings, presentations, critical reflection, group discussions, and collaborative team work in preparation for oral history fieldwork.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC103 AND EC104

 

EC290 Research Methods (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to research methods in the fields of English language and literature, linguistics, writing and translation, and communications and media studies and prepares them for their capstone project in the subsequent term. Students will refine their skills of library research as they identify and formulate research questions. They will learn how to apply qualitative, quantitative, and hybrid methods of investigation to seek answers to their research questions. They will also explore the ways in which data collection and analysis connect to project planning and implementation. Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and practice skills discussed in class. They will then employ what they have learned in the development of a capstone proposal.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC103 AND EC104 AND EC105 AND EC120 AND EC121 AND EC130 AND EC140 AND EC141 AND EC200 AND EC238

 

EC295 Special Topics (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102

 

EC299 Capstone (Credits: 3)

The capstone provides students with the opportunity to investigate an area of academic and professional interest while building upon the knowledge and skills they have acquired through their English & Communication coursework.  As the culminating experience for the BA in English & Communications degree, the capstone course is designed to be highly individualized.   The topics and format are proposed by the student subject to approval of a capstone adviser with expertise in the field.  Topics should be well aligned with the student’s background and interests.  Formats include academic research paper, a creative or practical project, or suitable internship, plus a portfolio of written work.   The course combines instructor-led class meetings, class discussions, presentations and individual consultations with advisers.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC290

 

FND101 Freshman Seminar I (Credits: 3)

This course aims to introduce students to the AUA’s core values—academic excellence, free inquiry, integrity, scholarship, leadership, and service —while building students’ communication skills. Students are challenged to translate these values into practice and reflect upon two interrelated themes: how might these values enrich their potential as lifelong learners and leaders, and how might these values help students collectively build a productive and democratic community. Throughout the semester students will sharpen their oral and written communication skills by engaging in class discussions and debates as well as by utilizing the various stages of the writing process to produce wellorganized paragraphs, letters, and short essays. Students will also have the opportunity to build an array of academic skills and familiarize themselves with university resources including the Papazian Library, Center for Academic Excellence, and Writing Lab through formal inclass trainings and home tasks.  Three hours of instructorled discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

FND102 Freshman Seminar 2 (Credits: 3)

Building upon the skills and concepts introduced in FND 101, this course aims to further develop students’ communication skills while exploring themes set forth in the AUA mission such as citizenship, leadership, community building, sustainable development, and service to society.  Students will examine how authors construct arguments and communicate persuasively through analyzing a variety of texts of different periods and genres. Students will also advance their communication and teamwork skills through class discussions, collaborative projects, and writing assignments.  The course includes weekly readings and assignments, a research-based group presentation, and a persuasive essay, in which students will investigate an important need in Armenia.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND101

 

FND103 Armenian Language & Literature 1 (Credits: 3)

This course exposes students to a variety of texts by Armenian and non-Armenian poets, playwrights, and novelists across various historical periods. Students will study the linguistic and literary values of these texts, gaining an understanding of how literature reflects and constructs the Armenian identity in social, cultural, political, and historical contexts. Students will gain an appreciation of the Armenian language and develop skills in literary analysis through close reading, writing, discussion and presentation. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.BREAKBREAKNote: Most sections will be offered in Armenian. Non Republic of Armenia citizens who did not graduate from an RoA high school whose language of instruction is Armenian will be eligible to enroll in an English-language section.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102

 

FND104 Armenian Language & Literature 2 (Credits: 3)

This course involves close reading of influential works by Armenian writers in their historical, cultural and comparative context.  The course examines the linguistic and cultural value of epic, short story, and spiritual literature through which students will gain an understanding of the interrelationship between literature and various aspects of Armenia’s history and development. Students are required to draw upon literary theories and influences in their final project and presentation, which may be either an original work or a sustained essay on an influential literary work. This course is designed for students with an Advanced to advanced background of the Armenian language. Although the course will be conducted in Eastern Armenian, it will expose students to literary works in both Western and Eastern Armenian.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND103

 

FND110 Physical Education (Credits: 0)

Under Armenian law, all university students are required to take 120 hours of Physical Education, and 40 hours of First Aid and Civil Defense training during their studies. At AUA, Physical Education is scheduled for the first two years, and First Aid and Civil Defense are scheduled during your first year only.  (Course description pending final approval.)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

FND152 First Aid (Credits: 0)

Under Armenian law, all university students are required to take 120 hours of Physical Education, and 40 hours of First Aid and Civil Defense training during their studies. At AUA, Physical Education is scheduled for the first two years, and First Aid and Civil Defense are scheduled during your first year only.  (Course description pending final approval.)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

FND153 Civil Defense (Credits: 0)

Under Armenian law, all university students are required to take 120 hours of Physical Education, and 40 hours of First Aid and Civil Defense training during their studies. At AUA, Physical Education is scheduled for the first two years, and First Aid and Civil Defense are scheduled during your first year only.  (Course description pending final approval.)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

FND221 Armenian History 1 (Credits: 3)

This course examines the history of Armenia, its land and people. The course will cover history from antiquity to the early modern age (beginning of the 16th century). The course examines the geopolitical, economic, religious and socio-cultural development of Armenia and explores the relationship between Armenia and other countries. Students will critically examine historical events, processes, actors, and models of history writing. Students will work individually and in groups to integrate evidence from various sources in order to develop a greater understanding of Armenian history. Instructor-led discussions. BREAKNote: Most sections will be offered in Armenian. Non Republic of Armenia citizens who did not graduate from an RoA high school whose language of instruction is Armenian will be eligible to enroll in an English-language section.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND104

 

FND222 Armenian History 2 (Credits: 3)

This course covers various episodes and aspects of the history of the Armenian people and their territories, beginning with King Arshak II (4th century CE) through the establishment of the modern Republic of Armenia and renewed independence in the 21th century.  The course explores the political, economic, and cultural trends within and beyond Armenia to understand Armenia’s development and identity in its global context.  Students will be required to conduct independent research using primary and secondary sources to analyze contemporary issues through a historical or comparative lens and to evaluate and synthesize evidence and arguments from various disciplines, effectively communicate their ideas to a broad audience, and present their findings utilizing appropriate software and technology. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to be forward-looking, to analyze Armenia’s unique history in order to anticipate challenges and opportunities for development.  Students will also be challenged to think of themselves as informed and responsible historical actors capable of positively influencing Armenia’s history.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.  (Most sections will be offered in English; however, some will also be available in Armenian for those able to work with Armenian-language sources).

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND221

 

 

LAW101 Law in Everyday Life (Credits: 3)

This course presents the basic principles of law as we experience it in everyday life.   It aims to inform students about their rights, duties and the predictable interactions people have with the legal system, from law enforcement to taxes and family law.  Students will learn how law is made, how it is applied in courts and by administrative bodies, how it regulates private relations and relations between the citizen and the state, through analysis and discussion about situations and cases from real life.  Assessment will include tests, papers, and presentations.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW110 Introduction to Armenian Justice System (Credits: 3)

This course explains the institutions and processes of the Armenian justice system as they affect the lives of citizens, businesses and government agencies, including general courts, specialized courts, criminal, civil and administrative processes.   The course aims to equip students to understand their rights and remedies for violation of rights, as well as the role of various government bodies, courts, police, prosecutors, regulators, in the administration and establishment of justice in Armenian society.   Instructor-led course will draw on case studies to examine a range of common situations students, citizens, and businesses face in everyday life.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW142 Introduction to Human Rights (Credits: 3)

The Introduction to Human Rights course will introduce students to the key concepts, rules and debates in the theory and the practice of contemporary international human rights. In particular, the course focuses on the historical development and philosophical and political foundations of human rights. Students will also explore international and national mechanisms for the protection of human rights, e.g. UN treaty and charter mechanisms, European systems of human rights protection, national judiciaries, human rights institutions and civil society organizations. Students will examine selected human rights and freedoms in order to understand human rights in practice. At the end of the course students learn the national and international legal grounds for limitations and derogations from human rights.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW160 Law & Justice in Popular Culture (Credits: 3)

This course explores how legal concepts, role models, and professional ethos in popular culture promote and reinforce the rule of law. The course aims to explore how dedicated individuals using the skills and arts of persuasive and knowledge of the law can expand justice in their societies by the use of legal mechanisms. Through the medium of film and literature followed by class discussion, the following basic concepts are reviewed: social contract theory, professional ethics, rule of law (e.g. resort to courts and legal structures to resolve conflict as an alternative to violence), comparative review of legal systems (e.g. use of juries, class action mechanisms, etc.) and standard defendant rights (right against self‐incrimination, right to counsel), professional responsibility for attorneys and judicial ethics, and legal advocacy.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW201 Armenian Constitution (Credits: 3)

The course aims to present the evolution, structure and content of the Armenian Constitution in historical and comparative perspective.  The course will analyze the Armenian Constitution and its role in social, economic, and political life, including such topics as the separation of powers, the system of checks and balances, supremacy of the constitution, constitutional rights and values, and the roles, powers and responsibilities of various constitutionally defined government structures, including the President, the National Assembly, the Government, judiciary and local self-government bodies.  Special emphasis will be placed on direct application of constitutional provisions, including the protection of fundamental civil and human rights.  Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW202 Legal Anthropology (Credits: 3)

This course aims at introducing and discussing issues on law-abiding and law-making behavior in its broader cultural context as an aspect of human society.   Topics include development/establishment of norms, their relation to justice, cultural values, social structures, and institutions, and means of promotion of compliance in different societies through socialization, education, enforcement and punishment.    Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW262 Public Advocacy (Credits: 3)

Increasingly lawyers, because of their insight into public policy, are called upon to use their skills to advocate in the court of public opinion and other fora beyond the formal courtroom and deliberative assembly. This course aims to equip students with models and skills to be effective public advocates. In addition to learning theoretical models and case studies, students will be called upon to design advocacy strategies and make written and oral presentations in simulations of public deliberation.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW300 International Legal English (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to English terminology and constructs related to basic legal concepts and general aspects of legal systems. The course also teaches students to perform legal practice skills in English as they relate to the following commercial law topics: company formation and management; capitalization; contract negotiation; remedies and assignment; employment issues; sale of goods law; real and intellectual property problems; negotiable instruments; secured transactions; debtor‐creditor interactions; and competition law. More than other fields, precision and competence in written expression is a tool of the legal profession. The course reinforces core reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in English and prepares students to obtain the International Legal English Certification upon successful completion of the ILEC exam. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW304 Legal Methods and Argumentation (Credits: 2)

This course is a legal problem solving based introduction to legal method and legal analysis as practiced in Western law today. Students will learn basic research skills, sources of precedent, the role of precedent and the development of precedent in the common law, the reading and “briefing” of cases, the reading and interpretation of statutes, the legal analysis of factual problems, objective legal writing (IRAC method) and basic legal argument. Argumentation is the use of effective reasoning to persuasively communicateBREAKan idea or position. Since classical times, argumentation has been a highly valued skill, even an art form. In this course, students will learn how to make deductive and inductive arguments; how to identify and utilize the elements of rhetoric; how to evaluate the claims, evidence, and inferences underlying arguments; how to understand and manipulate burdens of proof; and generally how to identify and utilize other argumentation frameworks and techniques. To complete the course students must present an argument, field questions from the class and/or participate in a formal debate with another student.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW305 Legal Profession (Credits: 1)

This course will examine the basic rules that govern the conduct of lawyers with respect to their clients, third parties and the courts, using as a guide case law, ethics opinions, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, the New York Rules of Professional Conduct and Rules on Advocate’s behavior in the Republic of Armenia. The emphasis will be on practical, real-world application of the rules, principally in a law firm setting. Among the topics that will be covered are the formation and termination of the attorney-client relationship, conflicts of interest, client confidentiality, attorney-client privilege, special issues relating to corporate clients, multijurisdictional and unauthorized practice, and legal malpractice and discipline. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW310 RA Civil Law Basics (Credits: 2)

For non-LLBsBREAKThis course will introduce the Civil Law thorough understanding of such fundamental categories as natural or legal persons, joint-stock companies, contracts and torts. It examines the basic principles of the Armenian Civil law and provides an understanding of private law basics, as it sets out the norms of conduct in both daily life and commercial activities. To that the Course will enable enhanced understanding of the Civil Code’s place as a cornerstone of all private law, followed by examination of the legal status of natural and legal persons, property law and transactions. The course will also incorporate instruction on the basics of contract law, including the most common contract varieties, as well as tort and inheritance law. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

LAW315 Survey of American Law (Credits: 3)

This course aims to give an overview of American law for non-US-lawyers. It approaches American law from a comparative, systemic point of view. The course examines the institutions, processes and main substantive areas of US law, viewing US legal system as a well-developed model, whose operation, evolution, problems and trends are well studied and documented. The course requires extensive reading of primary US materials (court decisions, statutes, regulations) as well as secondary sources on US legal doctrines and the American/common law way of thinking about legal problems. Upon completing the course, students should be able to identify the typical ways legal issues are handled in the US system in various common fields of law and to be able to explain them in terms of other legal systems they may be familiar with, e.g., the Armenian or continental legal systems. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW318 Introduction to American Law (Credits: 1)

This course introduces the United States legal system and is designed specifically for students who comeBREAKfrom jurisdictions other than the U.S. During the course the students will learn about the State andBREAKFederal judicial system of the United States, structures and functions of different legal institutions. TheyBREAKwill learn about the legal concepts specific to common law and will be introduced to major landmark BREAKcases that have become the bases of the nowadays-legal system. The topics will include jury trials, subjectBREAKmatter and personal jurisdiction, etc. The students will be offered to compare and discuss the peculiaritiesBREAKof the American law with the laws and concepts of own jurisdictions.

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LAW319 Topics in American Law (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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LAW328 Introduction to Labor Law (Credits: 1)

This course examines International and Armenian laws governing issues related to employment law (such as: fair and equal treatment, work place safety, etc.), as well as issues related to safety of personal information (personal data) and labor contract information confidentiality at work place. The course will be focusing on World Labor Organization (WLO) adopted principles, US and EU employments peculiarities including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as Armenian Labor Code main guiding principles. The primary focus of the course will be national labor law, including neighboring laws. The course will also have analytical and practical assignments on labor contract drafting and court case study examples. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW330 European Union Law (Credits: 3)

This course gives an overview of the European Union institutional and legal structure, its foundation documents, and regulatory framework, as well as issues relating to transactions and economic activity in the EU. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW334 European Convention on Human Rights (Credits: 3)

This course gives an overview of the European Convention on Human Rights and the procedures for appealing cases to the ECHR. Topics include applicability of ECHR in domestic courts, a survey of the most important ECHR precedents and trends. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW339 Topics in European Law (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered

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LAW340 Public International Law (Credits: 2)

From a legal problem solving perspective this course explores public international law in both an Armenian and regional context. Topics reviewed include sources of public international law and its contemporary development, the expanding scope of international actors (including non‐State actors like corporations), the utility of international and domestic fora and reviewing modern day challenges to future public international law development. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW341 International  Law from an Armenian Perspective (Credits: 3)

This problem-oriented course aims is to teach students the specifics of rules of international law as they apply to Armenia and Armenian issues. Topics will include current international law issues facing Armenia, including the Nagorno-Karabagh conflict, EU-Armenia relations, Armenia-Turkey Relations, national security and trans-border environmental and cultural heritage issues. The course is practice oriented, going beyond analysis of applicable legal norms and precedents to consider available enforcement mechanisms, and remedies. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW342 Human Rights Law (Credits: 3)

By presenting legal problems for discussion and resolution, this course introduces students to the principles and the practice of contemporary human rights law in the world and in an Armenian context. Attention is given to the development of individual claims against states regarding issues of torture; civil and political rights; economic, social and cultural rights; and women and ethnic minority rights. Also explored are contemporary challenges to international humanitarian law and individual accountability through the development of international criminal law. Sources of law reviewed include international treaties, customary law and Armenian legislation. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW344 International Criminal Law (Credits: 2)

International criminal law is a rapidly growing modern discipline of law. The historical goal for the development of this discipline was to end the impunity of individuals responsible for mass atrocities. International criminal law is a body of law containing legal provisions, institutions and traditions from pubic international law, comparative criminal law and human rights law. One of the aims of this course is to introduce students the key areas of international criminal law by engaging them in reading, researching, problem solving exercises and discussion regarding the most important aspects of this discipline. The other aim of this course is to promote interest in international criminal law among the members of the legal community of Armenia. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW345 Human Rights & Criminal Justice (Credits: 3)

In this course students explore a number of fundamental human rights that are applicable during criminal procedure from the moment of arrest to the final appellate decision. These criminal justice rights are examined in various situations where such a right may compete with other values and public interests, e.g. effective control of and fight against criminality. It is in such situations that different societies or decision-makers and policy-makers engage with complex and often controversial choices. The first part of this course will concentrate on pre-trial rights in the phase of investigation, while the second part focuses on trial rights during trial and appellate phases. The last two classes conclude this course by exploring the causes and solutions of ‘wrongful convictions’, a phenomenon that draws increasing attention in parallel to technological and scientific development. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW348 International Humanitarian Law (Credits: 3)

This course immerses students in the principles and the practice of contemporary International Humanitarian Law through an evolving complex case study. To teach advocacy and analytical skills, students are assigned various roles as they represent the interests of conflicting parties, divergent governmental interests and international organizations. Taught in conjunction with the ICRC, specific areas of IHL addressed include the qualification of armed conflicts, legal protections for non‐combatants, prisoners of war, civilians, and cultural property as well as legal limits on the use of weaponry. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW349 Topics in Public International Law (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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LAW350 Business Organizations (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on corporations, their formation and structure, the role of shareholders, management, regulators and other stakeholders, capital structures, kinds of securities, corporate financing, open vs. closed companies, and typical transactions and documents involved in corporate formation and investments. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW351 Project Financing (Credits: 2)

Project financing has become an increasingly preferred and used method of a combination of financing and investment. Although different methods of project financing are used in developed countries, in developing countries it is mostly used for implementation of major infrastructural projects, such as construction of roads, power plants, gas and oil pipelines, refineries, etc. It is also used in mining exploration, exploitation and development as well as in development of large industries, such as construction, equipping and putting into operation of large industrial complexes. BREAKThe course is intended to offer practical knowledge of some more common types of project financing such as Export Credit, Buy-Back, BOT and BOOT aimed at providing the participants with the necessary skills for examination, commenting on negotiating such contracts. It is also aimed at improving the contract drafting skills of the participants.

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LAW352 International Business Transactions (Credits: 2)

This course covers basic international sales of goods and services transactions, leasing, licensing, as well as investment, financial and secured transactions, and the typical kinds of documents and issues practitioners and client face in such transactions, including choice of law, dispute resolution, intellectual property, security, authority, custom s, tax and other regulatory matters. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW353 Banking and Securities Regulation (Credits: 2)

It will not be an exaggeration to say that financial sector as one of the main drivers of a national economy is also most heavily regulated one, and that is true for jurisdictions throughout the world. The course is intended introduce the students to the fundamental principles and targets of banking and securities market regulation, the regulation logic and goals it seeks to achieve. The course focuses on the regulatory regime of financing of businesses, their interaction with professional market participants, investors and regulators. It is structured in way that allows the students to capture general ideas and principles applicable worldwide as well as to get sense of peculiarities of Armenian financial regulatory system. After completing this course, students will be able to understand the regulatory goals and tools of market efficiency, investor protection and financial stability. Throughout the course financial regulation and policies will be discussed both at the domestic and international level. The course will help the students critically evaluate new developments in banking and securities regulation and their implementation in different contexts.

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LAW354 Tax Law (Credits: 2)

National taxation plays an important role in the public and economic policy of any country, serving many ends: economic, social, political, moral to name a few. However, in light of increasing crossborder mobility of goods, services, capital and labor, taxes became a crucial tool for international policy and economic competition. This course is an introduction to international aspects of taxation with particular focus on tax competition, double taxation treaties, transfer pricing. The course will also examine how the tax system of Armenia is facing the challenges posed by the rapidly integrating global economy. The Armenian perspective on each of the major topics discussed will be presented throughout the course. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW355 Corporate Governance (Credits: 2)

The Corporate Governance course presents and examines the main theories and practical issues ofBREAKcorporate structure, agency problem, shareholder primacy, control, as well as boardroom structure,BREAKstrategies, corporate officials’ compensation. The course will also present the current discussions onBREAKnewly emerging and developing financial investment mechanisms, such as hedge funds and private equityBREAKfunds and their impact over the issues of corporate governance. The course will include readings coveringBREAKthe law and practice of the United States, European countries, and comparative analysis will be conductedBREAKwith the Armenian legislation and practice. In the end of the course several issues of corporate criminalBREAKliability, compliance, and freedom of speech will also be explored.

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LAW356 Intellectual Property (Credits: 2)

This course aims to give students an overview of the kinds of intellectual property rights (copyright, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, etc.) and to introduce the fundamentals of intellectual property law through discussion and analyses of leading US court decisions. The course will also explore the main differences between the European, Armenian and the US Intellectual Property legislation and case law, as well as discuss the main issues involved in IP protection, registration, licensing, and litigation. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW358 International Investment Law (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on a very specific field – the law of protection of foreign investments. In particular, the content of the course will provide deep knowledge on substantive standards for protection, which are afforded to foreign investors through domestic legislation, bilateral and multilateral treaties, as well as through customary international law (e.g. fair and equitable treatment, protection from expropriation). Along with the substantive standards of protection, students will learn about potential venues, where they can seek protection for their clients, together with the applicable procedural and institutional framework for investor-state dispute settlement (ICSID, UNCITRAL, PCA).

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LAW359 Topics in Business Law (Credits: 2)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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LAW363 Topics in Comparative Law (Credits: 2)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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LAW364 Freedom of Information and Data Protection (Credits: 2)

Data protection and Freedom of Information Course provides a grounding in core elements of information law, focusing especially on those aspects that relate to processing of data online by data controllers and processor (Facebook, Google and not only), it also considers aspects relating to individual natural persons as subjects of information, as actors, engaged in freedom of expression or citizens, seeking information.  A number of cross-cutting themes will be considered, especially as these relate to the general tension between rights and interests grounded on the openness of information, on the one hand and privacy of a person, on the other.  The course will elucidate the relevance of the quality or the character of information, the context in which information has been obtained, the definition and relevance of the ‘public domain’ and the definition and relevance of the dissemination of information in the ‘public interest’.

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LAW365 Administrative Law (Credits: 3)

Individuals deal with administrative law from the moment their birth certificate is issued until the issuance of their death certificate, as well as every time they cross a street regulated by traffic lights in between. Administrative law regulates the exercise of many fundamental human rights, such as the freedom of association and assembly, freedom of expression and regulation of media, freedom of religion and free enjoyment of property. In many countries administrative law also regulates the launch and conduct of business, such as business registrations, licenses and inspections. In some countries administrative law governs eligibility for government benefits. Finally, administrative law guarantees judicial review of administrative action as a remedy against unlawful agency action. The aim of this course is to provide students with advanced knowledge of administrative law from Armenian, American and European perspectives, as well as to develop a number of skills necessary for practicing administrative law in Armenia. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW366 Topics in Constitutional Law (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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LAW367 Negotiations (Credits: 2)

This course aims to give students a framework for conducting orderly and effective negotiations, including preparation for negotiations, techniques and documents for handling typical situations that arise in business negotiations or dispute settlements. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW368 Topics in Alternative Dispute Resolution (Credits: 2)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered

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LAW369 Topics in ECHR: PostSoviet and Regional Caselaw (Credits: 3)

During this course students will critically study a number of selected judgments and decision of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in respect of the states in the Eastern and Central European region, as well as by post-Soviet states parties to the ECHR. As a result of such intensive case-studies, students will identify the structural, systemic causes and patterns of violations of the ECHR rights in the region. Students will also become proficient in analyzing, comparing, discussing and presenting complex international judgments. They will be able to identify the applicable judgment, distinguish it from inapplicable judgments and apply it to relevant factual situations to solve legal problems. In addition to regional knowledge on human rights violations and their causes, student will acquire skills for drafting complaints and making submissions to the ECtHR. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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Prerequisite: LAW334

 

LAW370 International, European & National Environmental Law (Credits: 3)

Environmental law is a global issue. This problem-oriented course introduces the various international European and national environmental law standards and frameworks applicable to various spheres of environmental concern. This course aims to familiarize students with the key concepts in the field of environment and considers how the environmental law may be used to facilitate environmental protection. The course will discuss the history, development, sources and principles of international environmental law and provide an overview of the international legal system in the context of environmental protection.BREAKThe course will review the global issues related to environment, such as the environmental impact assessment and public participation, atmospheric protection, climate change, transboundary water andBREAKbiodiversity to analyze the creation, implementation and effectiveness of international and the national environmental law. The course will address the role that international institutions play in the field of environment. The course will pay particular attention to global environmental problems such as the conservation of biological diversity and the international responses to climate change. The course will examine cross cutting issues, including the relationship between human rights and the protection of theBREAKenvironment. It will present the environment related case-law of the European Court of Human Rights. The course will cover the problems related to mining policy issues in Armenia. The course intends to provide overview of nuclear safety and civil protection legislation of Armenia. Three hours of instructorled discussion per week.

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LAW371 Introduction to Environmental Law (Credits: 1)

This course focuses on International and Armenian laws governing issues related to air pollution, water and forest resources protection, biodiversity safety and land contamination. Moreover, the course will provide with a brief introduction to issues related to special protected natural areas and laws regulating specific environmental ecosystems existing in Armenia. Environmental impact assessment (EPA), control over payments for natural resources utilization and environmental pollution fees will be discussed during the course with connection to regulatory mechanisms incorporated into national civil, administrative and criminal legal acts. The course will also include the analysis of local and international case-law related to environmental protection. At the end, a hypothetical case study will be introduced for a mock-trial related to a common environmental law case. One hour of instructor-led discussion per week.

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LAW390 Master’s Paper (Credits: 3)

This is the Program’s capstone experience, completed under the supervision of Program’s faculty. The Master’s Paper requires substantial research and writing and may include field work or case studies. Students shall select topics and determine the appropriate format and kind of research required in conjunction with the faculty advisor. All 2nd Year Students should enroll in this course in the Fall Semester and plan to complete their Master’s Paper by the end of the term.

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LAW391 Independent Study (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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LAW392 Clinical (Credits: 3)

The Clinical Opportunities are designed to permit students to gain practical experience in a law-related institution (e.g., courts, parliament, administrative body, NGO, mediation program) under the supervision of an experienced practitioner or legal researcher. Clinicals are non-credit, extracurricular activities. They are also an opportunity to do public service and gain experience as a practitioner. They should be approached with the same professionalism as any work assignment and with the same seriousness as regular, graded academic work. Clinicals may also involve internships, externships, or research at the AUA Legal Research Center or other approved site. Check with the Program Chair about Clinical Opportunities.

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PSIA101 Introduction to Political Science (Credits: 3)

This course provides students with an introduction to the approaches in the study of politics.  The course explores major concepts prevalent in political science including power, democracy, political culture and constitutionalism.  It identifies the major fields of study within the discipline and familiarizes students with the differences in approach that each follow from a comparative perspective.  Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and to practice skills discussed in class.

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PSIA102 Introduction to US Government (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the structures and functions of American government and politics.  Students study the major institutions, how political parties interact with government, how elections are conducted and how policies are made.  This is done within an historical context.  American Federalism and the changes in how government attends to problems both foreign and domestic are covered.  Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and to practice skills discussed in class.

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PSIA103 Introduction to Armenian Government (Credits: 3)

This course is a general introduction to the structure and functions of Armenian Government and its institutions, from historical, legal and comparative perspectives.  The role of each branch of the government, the scope of its authority, and checks and balances in the system, will be examined in light of constitutional design and ongoing political processes, along with the relationship between the national, regional and local levels of government.   Specific issues will include the state tax and budgeting process, fiscal accountability, lawmaking and regulation making, civic participation in the process, and mechanisms for public oversight of government activities and protection of individual rights as well as the military, law enforcement, and security agency’s special responsibilities and authority.   The course aims to help students understand the role of government in the 21st century and the rights and responsibilities of 21st citizen in public and governmental affairs, in light of international best practices and Armenia’s development. Three hours of instructor-led instruction per week.

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PSIA105 Introduction to International Relations (Credits: 3)

This course aims to introduce students to a wide-range of concepts, tools and cases in the study of contemporary international relations. The course includes an overview of the essential history of the global system and introduces the foundational theories and alternative theories upon which much of the analyses of world politics is based, including game theory.  The course explores how the international system, international law and diplomacy function in theory and practice.  Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes,  exams, projects and presentations.

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PSIA201 Political Philosophy (Credits: 3)

This course examines some of the deepest questions about politics and society. Why should we have government and what would things be like without it? Is there a duty to obey government or are people sometimes justified in resisting it? What form should government take and in particular, is democracy the best form of government? How much freedom should people have and is society justified in restricting freedom? What form of property system should society have and should society try to redistribute income and wealth? We will also examine the contribution that feminism has made to social and political thought. The course is organized around five main topics: 1. State of Nature, 2. Political Obligation, 3. Forms of Government, 4. Freedom and Rights, 5. Property and Social Justice.  Among the thinkers whose work will be covered are Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill.  Course work will involve essays, research, presentations, and close reading of philosophic texts. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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PSIA271 Religion & Politics (Credits: 3)

What is the relationship between religion and politics? This course examines the meanings of and interactions between, religion and politics in comparative politics and international relations.  Contrary to theories about toward secularization recent developments underscore the important role religion continues to play in world politics.  In many countries religious beliefs, practices and institutions shape individual values, social organizations, state institutions and international.  The course will examine trends and theories on the of religion in public life, in state and global politics, including separation of church and state (i.e., state secularism); nationalism and religion; war and peace; non-discrimination, and gender issues.  Issues of religion, church and state in Armenia will also be discussed in the context of global developments.  Assessment will include tests, essays, and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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PSIA272 Geopolitics of Asia (Credits: 3)

The course serves as an introduction to the complex regional dynamics that make up the international relations of Asia, a region of growing political and economic importance.  The course applies various analytical and theoretical approaches to understanding the complexities of the region, in its geographic, ethnic, religious and economic diversity.   The course explores the role of great power hegemony and various regionalisms, and the role of Russia, China, India and the United States, and their interrelations and external relations with the region. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes,  exams, projects and presentations.

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PSIA273 Geopolitics of Europe (Credits: 3)

The course explores Europe: its contributions, its torments, its communities, its races and ethnicities, its laws, its theories, its geo-political importance to the world; investigating its many roles as colonizer, imperialist, arbiter of theology and reason, scientist, artist, musician, author, philosopher, warrior, technologist, diversifier of migration, politician, democrat, nationalist, populist, institutionalist, protectionist. The course addresses such topics as the renaissance and reformation, enlightenment and absolutism; turmoil, power, capital, revolution, collectivism vs. individualism, division and recovery, modernizer and post-modernizer, nation-state proponent, cosmopolitanism, communitarianism.   Forty-five hours of instructor-led class tie.

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PSIA281 Development Policy (Credits: 3)

This course is a survey of the literature on key determinants of development “Development” at the statelevel and “development” at the project level.  We begin by considering some of the factors that drive state development, including economic growth, poverty reduction, social inequality, etc. We study different development models most popular in different periods of time, and then move on to the analysis of state policies in health and education,  population and migration, and the linkages between investments in human capital and economic growth.  The course then moves on  to other key topics in international development including accountability and good governance, conditionalities, monitoring and evaluation of results, etc.  The course concludes with a discussion on the scope and limitations of foreign aid and the institutions that implement aid policies. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

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PSIA282 Survey of Regional Politics (Credits: 3)

Survey of Regional Politics aims to provide insights into the existing and emerging dynamics of the Caucasian region. The course will identify and analyze features of political cultures, traditions of statehood and key domestic developments in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Iran, Georgia, as well as foreign policy priorities and interests of Russia, EU, USA. Special attention will be paid to Armenia’s relations with its neighbors and different geopolitical interests pursued by major global stakeholders. The course consists of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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PSIA300 Western Political Thought (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to Western Political Thought from a historical perspective. It covers all the essential ideas since early Greeks to the twentieth century that have shaped the political process and institutionalization of governance in Europe and the United States.

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PSIA302 Contemporary Political Analysis (Credits: 3)

This is an entry graduate-level course in research methods with a dual emphasis on: (1) comprehension of the fundamentals of social science research and competencies in identifying and consuming research literature; and (2) improvement of individual academic writing, including summarizing and synthesizing, critical analysis, argumentation, using citations, paraphrasing, etc. As a part of these two components, the course will also touch upon working with Excel – data entry, basic analysis, use of workbooks and graphs. The teaching methodology used in this course is learning by doing, with guided feedback, accompanied by readings, lectures, exercises, home assignments, peer reviews, and group work.

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PSIA303 Research Methods in Political Science (Credits: 3)

Introduction to research methods in political science covering the overall logic and theory of empirical research and the major quantitative and qualitative data collection methodologies and statistical analyses used.

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PSIA310 Comparative Politics (Credits: 3)

The course introduces key themes in comparative political systems as they impact governments and societies. It discusses both state and non-state actors, focusing on comparing political regimes, governance and its components, political processes and structures. The course discusses methodological frameworks of positivism and constructivism, rational choice, culture/history, institutionalism, historical analysis, and case studies.

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PSIA311 Regional Politics (Credits: 3)

The course gives an insight on the regional political developments. Features of political cultures, traditions of statehood and key domestic developments in Turkey, Iran, Azerbaijan and Georgia will be addressed. The course also reflects upon Armenia’s relations with those countries. The course is composed of lectures, seminars, discussions and presentations.

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PSIA312 Trade Politics (Credits: 3)

The course aims to identify key domestic, regional, and international actors in trade policy-making and assess how trade policy can influence the development of a country. Through assignments and discussions students will be able to analyse the scholarly literature linking trade policy with economic performance and critically evaluate a range of issue areas in trade policy through their functional and geographical manifestation. The course will also critically assess the future of the WTO and the multilateral trading system and their impact on shrinking policy space in terms of domestic regulations. The course will consist of instructor-led discussions.

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PSIA315 Foundations of Public Policy (Credits: 3)

This course provides a foundation for the study of public policy. It will present basic analytical models for examining public policy and examine public policy problems, issues, stakeholders, options and tradeoffs in a variety of public sectors such as health, energy, transportation, minorities, education, justice, agriculture, pensions.

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PSIA320 International Relations (Credits: 3)

This course aims at giving students an introductory level knowledge required to understand and analyze contemporary international politics. The course targets examining the theoretical and normative foundations of international relations, analyzing the mission, objectives and policies of international intergovernmental organisations, critically “reading” and understanding foreign policies of selected leading and small states alike, as well as touching upon the role that various non-state actors play in the world.

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PSIA323 International Governance (Credits: 3)

This is an MA level course that explores factors affecting international governance in the 21st century, framed within an environment of uncertainty, marked by a relationship of universality and particularity in space and time. International governance illustrates pressures upon state sovereignty, borders, national interests, including specific attention toward security, justice, energy, modernity, demography, technology, economy, ageing, migration, environment and health. Key actors include Westphalian states, international organizations, civil society and non-state movements. Theoretical analyses will include those of Foucault, Derrida, Habermas, Campbell, R.B.J. Walker, Castells, Der Derian, Wendt, Wallerstein, and others.

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PSIA324 Security Policy (Credits: 3)

This course addresses a number of security policy related issues, including decision making in the national security matters, strategic planning and implementation of security politics on the executive and different agency levels, implications of globalization and human rights on security related issues, interdependence of foreign, defense, intelligence and security policies. The course also reflects upon Armenia’s experience of national security policy planning and implementation.

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PSIA325 Conflicts and Geopolitics in the Caucasus (Credits: 3)

This course gives a critical perspective to ethnic and geopolitical developments in the region and tries to position them along with major theories of ethnicity. The course provides theoretical background on the existing discourses of nationalism, ethnicity and geopolitics with an objective of seeking a deeper understanding of the origins and dynamics of ethnic conflicts. Study of protracted conflicts in Nagorno-Karabakh, Abkhazia, South Ossetia, Chechnya, and Dagestan constitutes the bases of the course, other latent conflicts are also considered.

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PSIA326 Theories of Globalization (Credits: 3)

This course will explore globalization primarily from a theoretical view, though empirical applications will be included.While there will be substantive elements of knowledge, the primary emphasis will be in processing skills, i.e., in conceptualization, diagnosis, analysis and solution building. We are particularly interested in the scientific method, policy analysis and social science. It is the interaction of these three models that create the framework for the course. Attention will be given to the causes of globalization and the outcomes globally.

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PSIA327 EU/Global Politics (Credits: 3)

The main objectives of the course are: to supply knowledge to the students on what the EU is, what it does and how can we evaluate it as an actor in world politics; to offer understanding about the EU external relations in different policy domains, and enrich their knowledge on all important regions on the globe and the EU’s relations with them.

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PSIA328 Caucasus in the Global Context (Credits: 3)

This course studies the relationship between the Caucasus and other major actors in international politics. It focuses on the emerging role of the Caucasus in world politics, the foreign policies of other important actors that affect the Caucasus and important policy dimensions such as regionalism, security, conflict studies, and identify/legitimacy politics.

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PSIA335 International Conflicts in XXI Century (Credits: 3)

This writing-intensive course covers various issues pertaining to conflicts of international character in XXI century and is aimed at improving the understanding of the universe of state actors, international organizations and their interests, the environment of modern conflicts and possibilities of conflict resolution in the frameworks of international organisations and through ad hoc ‘coalitions of the willing’. The issues of global governance will be explored to understand international mechanisms that are currently employed for conflict prevention and resolution, such as the role of humanitarian and human rights organizations and international tribunals, in parallel with more conventional means such as peacekeeping missions or third-party mediation. To that end, we will enter the corridors of the United Nations and regional organizations in order to see how they deal with those crises in places such as Libya, Mali, Syria, Ukraine, Nagorno Karabakh, DRC or Colombia, and why, inter alia, criminal prosecution of masterminds of atrocity crimes in one place is not necessarily the right path to pursue in another.

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PSIA336 Foreign Policy Analysis: Theory and Practice (Credits: 3)

This graduate-level elective course will focus on how states, big and small, formulate and implement their foreign policies, both in theoretical and practical terms. We will explore the theoretical foundations of foreign policy-making in both legal and political domains, followed by process-oriented analysis of foreign policy decision-making in select countries and how that affects the conduct of diplomacy. To that end, various decision-making models (rational state actor, bureaucratic/organizational, institutional, societal etc) will be discussed and assessed from the perspective of modern challenges contemporary states are facing – especially in the context of growing mass participation in politics and acceleration of news cycles. Naturally, we shall venture to understand the role of key players (government agencies, political parties, leaders, etc) and secondary participants (NGOs, private interest groups, corporations, etc) in the making of foreign policy, as well as their interactions in-between. To the extent possible, this course will be based on domestic political, legal and institutional factors, leaving external triggers in the background, since those are well discussed in other courses too, in order to have a clear focus and learning objectives.BREAKOne of the core assumptions the course is built on is that the precise model of decision-making process at play significantly impacts the particular course of action eventually chosen. The environment of foreign policy-making process – predominantly focusing on domestic political developments (in democratic, authoritarian and hybrid regimes) – will be assessed case-by-case, as well as in comparative perspective, to give a big-picture understanding of complex challenges modern states are struggling with in foreign policy making process.

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PSIA340 Public Administration (Credits: 3)

The course studies the role and scope of bureaucracy in the modern state; examination of issues in the formulation and implementation of public policy; planning, programming, and decision-making in the bureaucratic policy-making process.

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PSIA341 Organizational Behavior (Credits: 3)

This course provides consideration of general theories and concepts of organization and bureaucratic behavior, strategies for control, stability, and change in modern state systems. This course is designed for graduate students with the expectation that they will expand their knowledge of those areas of organization life that deal with human relations and organizational psychology. The course will highlight how this knowledge will assist administrators in more effectively dealing with others in public and private organizations.

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PSIA343 Public Finance and Budgeting (Credits: 3)

This course develops a general understanding of the policy of public budgeting and finance. It presents a general overview of Western public finance and budgeting systems with an emphasis on the processes of planning, programming, appropriation, taxation, spending and managing a budget deficit. The course covers both theoretical aspects of public finance and budgeting, as well as politics, processes and institutions in government budgeting. Students also learn the peculiarities of government budgeting in Armenia in comparison with the Western system.

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PSIA344 Public Policy Analysis (Credits: 3)

The course consists of three parts. In the first part concepts and theories of public policy analysis are discussed. The general framework for policy analysis is presented. The second part of the course focuses on tools and methods of policy analysis, with a specific focus on one quantitative (regression analysis) and one qualitative (focus groups) method of obtaining and systematizing relevant data. The third part of the course applies theoretical and the methodological knowledge discussed in the previous two sections to the Armenian reality.

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PSIA345 Development Policy and Strategy (Credits: 3)

This course starts by considering some of the factors that drive or hinder development, including economic growth, reduction of poverty and inequality, access to resources, education and health care, etc. Then, the course moves on to cover the basis of political decisions made by governments of developing countries across a range of themes. Here, the course explores competing approaches to the role of the state in development and also engages in debates on the characteristics essential for development, contrasting in particular institutional approaches and the good governance agenda. Finally, the course dedicates sessions to sector-level policies: agricultural, industrial, employment, and poverty reduction policies.

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PSIA347 Environmental Policy (Credits: 3)

The aim of this course is to introduce the tools, approaches and institutions that govern political decision-making in the field of environmental conservation and natural resource management. The course starts with an overview of global environmental issues of concern to all humanity and their impact on people’s life. Students further explore the international and national policy frameworks that focus on environmental issues and zero in on their solutions. Students learn about history of environmental policy and politics in the US, Europe (and particularly EU) and former Soviet Union; emergence and evolution of green parties, social movements and groups. Armenia’s international obligations in environmental sector are presented to students.

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PSIA348 Policy and Program Evaluation (Credits: 3)

Program Evaluation is the systematic use of empirical information to assess and improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of public or nonprofit programs and policy interventions. Evaluation is increasingly required by funders and policy makers concerned with accountability and efficient use of public or private resources. In addition, many governments and nongovernmental organizations have built the logic of evaluation into their work through performance management and monitoring systems. This course trains you in different types of program evaluation, including needs assessment, formative research, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis.

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PSIA350 Macroeconomics (Credits: 3)

An intensive course in macroeconomic analysis that studies the performance of the national economy and the global economy.

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PSIA351 Microeconomics (Credits: 3)

This course covers the essential microeconomic principles and applies them to public decisions. It covers the key principles of microeconomics, such as supply, demand, and market processes and provides extensive coverage of topics that concern public sector decisions.

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Prerequisite: PSIA350

 

PSIA352 Economics for Political Science (Credits: 3)

This course covers concepts and principles in economics which are most relevant for political science and international affairs. Special focus will be placed on topics concerning the government’s role in the economy. Topics covered include production and consumption, supply and demand, the concept of utility, the public and private sector, welfare economics, market failures (monopoly, externalities, and public goods) and government control, game theory and applications, GDP and national income, growth (capital accumulation, institutions, and technological advances), money and inflation, international flow of goods and capital (migration, external trade, exchange rates, and foreign investment), and monetary and fiscal policy. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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PSIA353 International Political Economy (Credits: 3)

An overview of international political economy (IPE) from a theoretical and empirical perspective. Focuses on substantive elements and their mixture with process dynamics.  Analytical models will include scientific method, policy and social science concepts and methods. Emphasizes macro and micro empirical findings. Reviews normative and empirical findings. Evaluates interaction of states and non-states.  Analytic methods primarily qualitative with inclusion of empirical quantitative results.

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PSIA355 Moral and Social Issues in Policy-Making (Credits: 3)

In this course we critically assess policy options in issues surrounding medicine and technology, such as abortion, euthanasia, animal experimentation, organ procurement and distribution, stem cells, cloning, genetic intervention, and healthcare provision. Should euthanasia be legal? If so, under what conditions? Should abortion be prohibited, available for any reason, or for only some reasons? Is using animals for medical experimentation justified? How should society address the scarcity of human organs for transplantation? Should people be allowed to buy and sell organs? If cloning of humans were possible would it be justified? What are stem cells and why are their uses controversial? Should genetic intervention by parents permitted? Is there or should there be a right to healthcare? How should society distribute scarce medical resources? The course emphasizes critical analysis of policy options on these issues and the development of students’ critical thinking and writing abilities. The course will consist of instructor-led discussions and analysis of readings. Course assessment consists of papers, participation, and a final exam.

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PSIA360 Armenian Politics (Credits: 3)

This course provides an in-depth understanding of Armenian politics. It examines the major turning points of the country’s political transitions and examines questions related to the system of governance, democratic transition, institutional, political, economic, and social developments in the post-Soviet Armenia. Issues of the Soviet heritage as well as questions related to the impact of the Karabakh conflict on the domestic developments of Armenia will be considered too. The course will also discuss topics related to elections, political parties, power relations, problems of migration, democratic consolidation, and relations with the Armenian Diaspora. The course consists of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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PSIA363 The Politics of Self-Determination and Secession (Credits: 3)

The recent Kurdish and Catalonian referenda pushed the right of people for self-determination once again to the forefront of international politics. There are more than three dozen potential self-determination movements throughout the globe and yet international law remains elusive about their legitimacy and outcome. The course will study and analyze currently active self-determination movements, through the dual lenses: international law on self-determination and global politics, and assess whether these movements can rely on international law to support their independence claim — or it is all politics. The course will be constructed around Kosovo independence and the Nagorno-Karabakh peace process, in cross references throughout to other relevant self-determination movements. It will outline the body of international law on self-determination and navigate through its loopholes to demonstrate the legal arguments made on both sides of the divide. Instructor-led class time.

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PSIA364 Middle East Politics (Credits: 3)

The Middle East is widely associated with an area of conflicting global and regional interests. By learning about key questions and debates in the field of Middle East politics (Arab-Israeli conflict, Syrian civil war, Iraq-Iran conflict etc.), the course aims to give students a critical understanding of politics in the region. Topics may include “persistent authoritarianism” in the Middle East, political Islam, sectarian violence, economic development and underdevelopment, social mobilization and the foundations of the Arab Spring, and the challenges of Armenian communities living in the Middle East.

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Prerequisite: PSIA320 AND PSIA310

 

PSIA367 Topics in Political Science (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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PSIA368 Topics in International Affairs (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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PSIA369 Graduate Seminar on Globalization Theories and Strategies (Credits: 3)

This course is a seminar in international affairs designed for MA students in PSIA.  The course will address certain globalization aspects such as ‘push and pull’ as well as pluses and minuses, affecting states and populations.  It will particularly deal with structure and processes of current dynamics in international affairs such as financial inequality, migration, statism vs. liberal structures, and will explore the current provocations created by populism and millennial socialism.BREAKThe course disciplines will include political economy and political science, exploring a number of international relations theories such as realism, liberalism, constructivism, structuralism and post-structuralism.  Attention will be give to the special challenges of  small states as they move forward with development strategies.BREAKThe course will include governing in a volatile global economy, particularly one embedded in current shocks affecting income, labor markets, law and normative behavior, migration and interdependence of global interactions such as trade and performance of transnational institutions.BREAKThe course will be conducted in a seminar format.  This requires substantial discussion rather than lecture.  Readings will prepare the participants for issues to be explored.  The instructor will act as a discussion leader.  The students will carry responsibility for proposing correlations and causations about which one can hypothesize.  Students will report the significant ingredients of the readings and others will be prepared to react to issues presented and raise appropriate questions.  One or two guest speakers will be invited to contribute to the seminar.BREAKCourse evaluation will include short concept papers; continued oral presentations and contributions; final term paper ability to analyze and critique other student presentations.

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Prerequisite: PSIA320

 

PSIA370 European Integration (Credits: 3)

The course will provide an understanding about the European Union (EU) as a unique `regional´ institution with the highest degree of delegation of competencies from the national to the supranational level. European integration is treated as a large case with its specific aspects (history, institutional interplay and policies) analyzed through the lenses of the EU-intrinsic mid-range theories and IR theories.

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PSIA371 Politics of the European Union (Credits: 3)

The course aims to theorise and understand the key patterns of the EU’s political activity and its organizational engagement through analyzing key institutions and processes that enable the European Union to be an actor and to be active in a range of policy sectors. The course will also critically examine the strengths and weaknesses of substantive EU policies pursued in the internal and external arena which will help to reflect on strategic considerations and particular policy programmes of the European Union.  Instructor-led discussion.

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PSIA372 European Neighborhood Policy (Credits: 3)

The course focuses on the European Neighborhood Policy (ENP), encompassing also the Union for the Mediterranean and the Eastern Partnership, developed by the European Union (EU) towards its political periphery, namely, North Africa/Middle East, and the former Soviet Union. It additionally deals with the EU’s policy in different domains, i.e. trade, democracy, human rights, public administration, civil society, justice, migration, etc.

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PSIA373 Geopolitics of Asia (Credits: 3)

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PSIA374 Small States in Worlds Politics (Credits: 3)

This course provides a general overview of the challenges and limitations of small states in world politics. To tackle these issues, the course will first try to define the concept of “small state” and its historical evolution, after which a detailed examination of the issues that small states face in contemporary world politics will be analyzed. Some of the areas to be examined include: foreign policy and diplomacy; economic constraints and advantages; development of domestic institutions; democracy and public opinion; and nationalism as a response to globalization.

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Prerequisite: PSIA320

 

PSIA382 TBD (Credits: 3)

TBD

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PSIA383 Contemporary Political Philosophy (Credits: 3)

This course examines contemporary theories in political philosophy. The theories to be examined are utilitarianism, liberal egalitarianism, capabilities approach, libertarianism, and communitarianism. In examining these theories, the course will cover topics such as justice in the distribution of income and wealth, equality, taxation and incentives, unconditional basic income, and the moral limits of the market. Thinkers include such authors as Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Cohen, Sen, Walzer, Sandel, and Marx. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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Prerequisite: PSIA300

 

PSIA384 Civil Society and Social Capital (Credits: 3)

This course analyses the concepts of civil society and social capital and explains their prominence in current social science. As a first building block, the course material includes relevant works of major social theorists, sociologists and political scientists. The course then makes a transition from theoretical concepts to empirical studies of civil society and social capital. The last part of the course is dedicated to applying the concepts and the approaches to the Armenian reality. The course is envisioned as a seminar with active student participation in class discussions.

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PSIA385 Global Justice (Credits: 3)

This course examines whether ideals of justice should be applied across the world, by examining debates in global justice. Should principles of distributive justice be applied globally or are they only relevant to particular societies? Is global justice an unrealistic goal? Do people in wealthy nations have a duty to give to the starving overseas? Is poverty a human rights violation? Do we have obligations towards our co-nationals and if so, do these obligations defeat the claims of global justice? Would military intervention to achieve global justice be justified? Should there be open borders between nations? Should there be a world government? Do we have duties towards future generations? What are the implications of any such duties for climate change? These and other questions will be addressed in this course.

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PSIA390 Research Design (Credits: 1)

This seminar is designed to assist students in preparing their research for their final, capstone experience in Political Science and International Relations.  This includes Master’s Essays, Internship Reports and Policy Papers.  Before one can embark on their final papers, students must plan and prepare for the activities and actions necessary to complete the final paper. This course is mandatory for ALL second year students.

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PSIA391 Policy Internship Project (Credits: 3)

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PSIA392 Master’s Essay (Credits: 3)

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PSIA393 Policy Paper (Credits: 3)

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PSIA395 Master’s Thesis (Credits: 6)

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PSIA399 Independent Study (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to permit students to design and complete a course of study under the supervision of an instructor for credit. Such courses typically address a special area of interest of the student and instructor outside the standard offerings of the program and have an interdisciplinary or research components. The course must include a co-designed syllabus and evidence of learning equivalent to a standard 3-credit course. Independent study courses are subject to the instructor’s approval and Program Chair’s consent.

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TEFL300 English for Language Teachers (Credits: 2)

The course is designed to improve students’ English proficiency with a primary emphasis on the speaking skill. The following language areas are targeted: speaking accuracy, fluency, complexity, pragmatics, and pronunciation. These areas are practiced through a variety of speaking genres including, but not limited to, a formal presentation, impromptu speech, small talk, telephone conversation, oral summary, lesson presentation, and news story. As students prepare for these and other assignments, they are expected to watch and listen to a lot of authentic material relevant to their professional and personal interests. The content of the course is tailored to MA TEFL students. Hence, the assignments in terms of content and format are closely linked to students’ academic and professional needs.  One to two hours of instructor-led discussion per week. One to two hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL301 Introduction to TEFL Methodology (Credits: 3)

The course surveys language teaching approaches and methods and their underlying principles, with a particular focus on the basic questions of language acquisition and affective/cultural variables that impact on second and foreign language teaching and learning. The course provides an overview of the historical development of language teaching, addresses the roles and responsibilities of the modern language teacher, and introduces the basic concepts of motivation, learning styles and strategies, learner autonomy, course evaluation and assessment, exploring how current understanding of language learning and language acquisition informs teaching practice. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL302 Teaching Language Skills (Credits: 3)

This course introduces the underlying theories and classroom practices for teaching ESL/EFL reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course highlights the nature of literacy and oral language development, beginning language skills (phonemic awareness, phonics, pronunciation), and meaning-focused language instruction. This practical course focuses on developing students’ technical abilities to effectively design classroom activities that target language skills and integrate them into coherent lesson plans. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL304 Classroom Assessment (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on school/classroom-based assessment.  It provides the latest information on the theoretical principles of language testing and assessment and discusses the implementation of the principles in real life practices. The primary focus of the course is on language assessment in classroom context. In addition, the course provides learners with knowledge and skills required for critically examining the existing tests and selecting or developing appropriate tests for their own academic context. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL305 Research Methods (Credits: 3)

This course will lay the foundations for the students to learn about various principles and issues regarding research methods in second or foreign language teaching and classroom research. The course will look at the various viewpoint involved in research, the issues raised by quantitative and qualitative research, how the research program is to be structured and carried out, and how to report findings. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL306 Teaching Practicum (Credits: 3)

The purpose of this course is to consolidate the theory and practice of teaching EFL and engage students in reflective practice. This course combines face-to-face classes on topics related to practical aspects of teaching EFL classes (e.g., lesson planning, classroom management) and fieldwork experience including EFL class observations and supervised teaching

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Prerequisite: TEFL302

 

TEFL307 New Technologies in TEFL (Credits: 3)

Once viewed primarily as a domain studying computer-mediated means of learning and teaching languages, this field has expanded to include new tools such as mobile and cloud technologies, and social media. This course will survey current trends and best practices in new technologies specific to the TEFL field. It will provide an overview of related theory and practice in the areas of social media and networks, digital video and storytelling, digital games, 3D virtual worlds, mobile technologies, distance and open education, open educational resources, and cloud computing specific to TEFL. Students will engage in research, hands-on, and material development projects to enhance their practical skills of using technologies for teaching purposes. They will also learn how to harness the strengths of new technologies to become life-long learners in their profession. Students are expected to be conversant in Internet and basics of second language acquisition. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: TEFL301 OR TEFL302

 

TEFL308 English for Specific Purposes (Credits: 3)

With the growing interest in teaching English for specific purposes (ESP) around the world and Armenia where almost all non-English major students study English through ESP programs, it is imperative that MA TEFL graduates develop a sound knowledge of the field. This course introduces students to many areas of ESP including English for academic purposes and English for occupational purposes. The course helps students understand and apply ESP principles to serve the needs of the society. Three hours of instructor-led discussion and experiential learning per week.

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Prerequisite: TEFL301 OR TEFL302

 

TEFL309 Curriculum Design (Credits: 3)

This course will help students to develop a deeper understanding of the principles and procedures that inform current practices in language curriculum design, how they impact classroom pedagogies and shape materials development. TE 308 will also equip students with a variety of theoretical resources and insights for the formulation and implementation of appropriate language courses.  Students will gain insight into EGP (English for General Purposes) and ESP (English for Specific Purposes).  ESP includes many areas such as EAP (English for academic purposes), EOP (English for occupational purposes), EST (English for science and technology), etc.  Finally, the course will enable students to develop a critical view of curriculum design as it relates to Armenia’s EFL context. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL310 Teaching Internship (Credits: 3)

Students enrolled in TEFL 310 will teach a group of students independently.  During that time, they will function as independent teachers and operate as the main teachers in their class.  During their Teaching Internships, MA TEFL students will:  1) Teach a group of students independently, 2) Receive supervision and support from their Faculty Mentor, 3) Benefit from class observations by their Faculty Mentor, 4) Develop supplemental teaching materials to accompany textbook, 5) Craft their own lesson plans, 6) Design their own classroom tests and quizzes, 7) Develop their own teaching materials, 8) Compile a teaching portfolio. This course does not meet face-to-face on a regular basis.

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TEFL311 Vocabulary Teaching and Learning (Credits: 3)

This course provides students with insights regarding both vocabulary learning research as well as best practice in vocabulary teaching. Both are supported through a corpus-linguistic approach and hands-on activities in the classroom. In addition, the course reviews current research and standards regarding vocabulary assessment. Examples and materials pertain to teaching English as a second or foreign language. Three hours of instructor-led discussion and experiential learning per week.

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TEFL312 Teaching Test Preparation Courses (Credits: 2)

The objective of TEFL 312 is to help students become successful test preparation teachers. The course presents key features of major English language proficiency tests and prepares students to design and teach test preparation classes. While the course introduces tips and strategies to prepare English learners for proficiency tests, the emphasis is placed on teaching the language and skills through materials and activities based on communicative language teaching principles. Fifteen instructional hours based on instructor-led discussion.

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Prerequisite: TEFL301 OR TEFL302

 

TEFL314 Teaching English to Young Learners (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to theoretical principles and current practices of teaching and assessing learners of English starting from preschool until teenage years. The course also covers fundamentals of bi- and multi-lingual education. Practical course assignments include observations, material development, and teaching. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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Prerequisite: TEFL301 OR TEFL302

 

TEFL315 Teaching Armenian to Non-native Speakers (Credits: 1)

This course promotes the development of reflective and knowledgeable professionals prepared to teach Armenian as a second or foreign language in a variety of instructional settings. Students learn to apply their linguistic and cultural knowledge of Armenian and effectively address the needs of learners from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The course explores current practices of teaching Armenian as a second or foreign language, helps students evaluate existing curricula and apply their pedagogical competence to develop their own materials. Fifteen instructional hours based on instructor-led discussion.

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Prerequisite: TEFL301 OR TEFL302

 

TEFL320 Introduction to Language (Credits: 3)

An introduction to language in all its aspects as studied in the field of linguistics, including a focused concentration of how this approach relates to language education. This course explores biological, historical, and social/cultural aspects of language, and then addresses the system of language, looking at phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and discourse analysis. It covers most areas of linguistics at the introductory level, familiarizing students with general principles and key vocabulary in these areas, and exploring the relationship between the study of linguistics and language teaching. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL321 English Grammar: Structure and Pedagogy (Credits: 3)

This course studies English sentence structure – morphology, syntax, and semantics – as it relates to the teaching and testing of ‘grammar’. The students examine the sentence level grammar of English in terms of both the forms and functions of basic grammatical elements. Thus, the focus is largely on syntax and semantics, with phonological and morphological aspects of sentence level grammar considered as necessary for the fullest understanding of the structure of English. The consideration of the functions of grammatical elements requires some consideration of discourse and how grammar plays a role in creating discursive structures in longer texts. In addition, the students also learn to develop their own lesson plans and materials for teaching grammar consistent with contemporary theory and the need to focus on form within a meaning-based or communicative approach. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL322 Seminar on Current Topics in Applied Linguistics (Credits: 3)

This course promotes an informed understanding of the relationship between knowledge, theory and practice in the field of language study as understood in Applied Linguistics. It encourages students to investigate how various ways of looking at language can influence their thinking about language teaching. The aims of this course are to: 1) Familiarize students with major issues and insights in the field; 2) Introduce students to some current topics and debates in the field; 3) Study in some depth particular articles as a way to acquaint students with particular issues and topics of potential interest to them. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL323 Second Language Acquisition (Credits: 3)

This course explores the various theories that scholars and researchers have put forward concerning second language acquisition, or how people learn languages.  Since it is language learning that is being examined, it is important to understand what language is.  Linguistics explores this question, and hence, this course draws to some extent on insights from linguistics.  In addition, as people and learning have both social and psychological dimensions, the course also draws on insights from sociology and psychology.  In other words, SLA is an inter-disciplinary subject that draws on all three disciplines, as well as the sub-disciplines and research areas that inter-relate them. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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TEFL327 Leadership and Management in Language Teaching (Credits: 2)

The role of leadership and management in the arena of English teaching has greatly expanded in the past twenty years, influenced by the growing acceptance of management principles. This development makes the topic highly relevant to MA TEFL students, some of whom will be required to manage language programs or schools. This course places emphasis on quality, efficiency, economic sustainability, accountability to stakeholders and a focus on service. Students will familiarize themselves with these principles and the matching practices. Instructor-led discussion.

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TEFL328 Advanced Academic and Professional Writing in Applied Linguistics and TEFL (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to prepare the students in MA TEFL both for the task of writing up their capstone projects effectively and for participating in the advanced written discourse of the academic and professional communities in applied linguistics, TEFL and TESOL, internationally. The students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the most prominent features of successful reports, research papers and similar texts, with the emphasis on discourse features, thematic flow, cohesion, coherence and citation. Some of the skills this course aims to reinforce are reading for new information, identifying synergies between texts, paraphrasing and quoting effectively while giving prominence to their own words and ideas. Two hours of instructor led discussion and workshops per week.

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TEFL330 Endangered Languages and Biodiversity (Credits: 1)

About 70 percent of all languages currently spoken on Earth occur in approximately one-fourth of the planet’s land area (excluding Antarctica) that is designated as a Biodiversity Hotspot or High Biodiversity Wilderness Area. As is the case with species occurring in the biodiversity regions, many of the languages spoken in the Hotspots and High Biodiversity Wilderness Areas are unique to individual regions, thereby marking the sole opportunities to maintain them. Moreover, many of the languages occurring in these regions are spoken by small numbers of people indicating that much of the linguistic diversity (and, by implication, cultural diversity) currently present in biodiversity regions is in danger of disappearing in the foreseeable future due to the high vulnerability of small groups to changes in their cultural systems and environments amid rapid globalization.” From: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~romaine/lingbiodiversity.html.    Through readings, class materials and lectures, this course introduces students to Earth’s Biodiversity Hotspots and the linguistic and cultural groups that live in these hotspots.  The course is co-taught by ACE and TEFL and sensitizes students to current linguistic and biodiversity issues.

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TEFL340 Special Topics in Applied Linguistics (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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TEFL341 Special Topics in TEFL (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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TEFL390 Independent Study in TEFL/Applied Linguistics (Credits: 3)

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TEFL391 Capstone Preparation (Credits: 3)

Students enrolled in TEFL 391 must meet with their Capstone Committee or adviser on a regular basis during the semester, to discuss their proposals and report on details about their MA capstone. Students will only meet a few times as a class. At the end of the semester, students will write a proposal for their capstone and present it in class for feedback and discussion. The course does not meet face-to-face on a regular basis.

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TEFL392 Capstone Project (Credits: 3)

In this course, students will implement their capstone projects, which depending on the project, may include data collection and analysis, development and piloting of materials.. In the process, they will have a few face-to-face class sessions, meet with their Capstone Committee or adviser on a regular basis, and write an MA Thesis or MA Design Project. In addition to the written work, students will present their final capstone publicly. The course does not meet face-to-face on a regular basis.

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Prerequisite: TEFL305 AND TEFL309

 

TEFL393 Comprehensive Examinations (Credits: 3)

Students enrolled in TEFL 393 prepare for Comprehensive Exams, one of the capstone options available for MA TEFL students. Comprehensive Exams consist of examination sessions administered over two days. They take place on campus and are scheduled in the students’ last term of study at AUA. Students attend an initial orientation session, receive detailed exam guidelines, including dates, times, and location of the comprehensive exams, a reading list, and sample exam questions. This course does not meet face-to-face on a regular basis, but will include an initial meeting and additional sessions as needed. Students are strongly encouraged to form study groups and use all the materials provided to them to prepare for the comprehensive exams.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

 

 

Zaven and Sonia Akian College of Science and Engineering (CSE)

 

 

CS100 Calculus I (Credits: 3)

This introductory course covers topics including: functions of one variable, transcendental  functions;  introduction  to  complex  numbers;  polar  coordinates;  limits,  continuity; derivatives,  techniques  of  differentiation,  differentiability,  extrema  of  differentiable  functions, applications of differentiation; indefinite and definite integrals, mean value theorem, related-rates problems, and the fundamental theorem of calculus.  Students are required to complete weekly problem sets in order to develop basic proficiency in the mathematical foundations introduced in the field of Calculus. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS101 Calculus 2 (Credits: 3)

This course builds on CS100 and covers topics including: the definite (Riemann) integral,  applications of integrals,  improper integrals,  numerical series,  Taylor series. Students are required to complete weekly problem sets in order to develop proficiency on the subject. The format of the course is three hours of instructorled class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS100

 

CS102 Calculus 3 (Credits: 3)

This final course in the three-term Calculus sequence spans the following topics: vectors in multiple dimensions; functions of several variables, continuity, partial derivatives, the gradient and Jacobian, directional derivatives, extrema, Taylor’s Theorem, Lagrange multipliers; multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, divergence theorem, Green’s theorem, Stokes’ theorem. Students are required to complete weekly problem sets in order to demonstrate intermediate competency in multi-variable Calculus. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS101 AND CS104

 

CS103 Real Analysis (Credits: 3)

The fundamental concepts in analysis are rigorously treated with emphasis on reasoning and proofs. The topics include completeness and order properties of real numbers,  limits, continuity and uniform continuity,  conditions for integrability and differentiability,  infinite sequences and series,  basic concepts of topology and measure, metric spaces, compactness, connectedness,  continuous functions on a compact set, the contraction mapping lemma.  Students are required to apply practical analytical  methods to formulate, critically assess, and solve problems which arise in computational sciences and mathematical modeling.  Three hours of instructorled class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS102

 

CS104 Linear Algebra (Credits: 3)

This introductory course covers topics including: vectors, dot products, hyperplanes; systems of linear equations, Gaussian elimination; matrix operations, determinants; vector spaces, linear independence, change of basis, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, the characteristic equation; the spectral theorem; complex vector spaces, complex eigenvalues, Jordan canonical form, matrix exponentials, differential equations. Students are required to apply practical analytical methods to solve problems which arise in computational sciences. Students will also learn to formulate a matrix representation of basic problems seen in mathematical modeling.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS105 Ordinary Differential Equations (Credits: 3)

The course examines topics including: first order equations, solution methods, higher order linear equations, series solutions, Laplace transforms, systems of linear equations, linear systems with constant coefficient, systems with periodic coefficients, existence and uniqueness of solutions, phase plots, eigenvalue problems, eigenfunction expansions, Sturm-Liouville theory, linearization about critical points, limit cycles, Poincaré-Bendixson theorem, Hartman-Grobman theorem, chaotic solutions and strange attractors, applications. Through the course, students will learn to formulate representations of basic problems seen in mathematical modeling. Students are required to apply practical analytical methods to solve problems which arise in computational sciences. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS101 AND CS104

 

CS107 Probability (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to the mathematical study of randomness and uncertainty. Course covers topics including: Axioms and properties of probability; Conditional probability and independence of events; Random variables and distribution functions; Expectation, variance and covariance; Jointly distributed random variables; Independent random variables; The law of large numbers; The central limit theorem; Markov chains. Students are required to complete weekly problem sets in order to develop problem solving skills in Probability. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS111 AND CS101 OR ENGS102

 

CS108 Statistics (Credits: 3)

This course provides students with a general introduction to statistical modeling and inference, including topics such as descriptive statistics, estimation in parametric models, risk evaluation, maximum likelihood method and method of moments, Bayesian approach, confidence intervals, statistical hypotheses testing, multiple linear regression, least-squares estimation, significance of the coefficients, goodness-of-fit tests, and chi-squared test of independence. Students will develop basic skills in data modeling and gain proficiency in R software. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS107

 

CS110 Introduction to Computer Science (Credits: 3)

The course provides students with a broad foundation in computer science. Topics include: introduction to digital technology, historical review from valves to integrated circuits; logic gates; binary, octal, and hexadecimal systems; evolution of computer architecture, Von Neumann architecture, basic components, internal and external interfaces, types of removable media; introduction to operating systems. Students should be able to demonstrate basic understanding of the software and hardware systems related to computational sciences, and demonstrate strong understanding of the relevant common software and information technology. Students will develop rudimentary foundational knowledge in mathematical modeling and gain proficiency using software and hardware systems related to computational science. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS111 Discrete Mathematics (Credits: 3)

This is an introduction to discrete mathematics and discrete structures. The course examines topics including: propositional logic; Boolean algebra; introduction to set algebra; infinite sets; relations and functions; recurrences; proof techniques; introduction to number theory; elementary combinatorics and graph theory; applications to computer science. Students will learn to apply discrete numerical methods to solve problems which arise in computational sciences. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS112 Numerical Analysis (Credits: 3)

The course investigates topics including: floating-point arithmetic, cancellation and rounding, random number generation; finding of roots of nonlinear equations and systems; interpolation, extrapolation, function approximation; numerical integration, Gaussian quadrature; Monte-Carlo methods; numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, predictor-corrector methods, shooting methods for boundary value problems. Students are required to formulate, critically assess, and apply practical numerical methods to solve problems and subtasks.  Through the problem sets and group projects, students will demonstrate intermediate proficiency in designing and analyzing complex data structures and algorithms as well as in developing and testing software tools and methods relevant to numerical analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS101 AND CS104

 

CS120 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming (Credits: 3)

The course will survey the following topics: control structures,  functions,  arrays,  strings,  introduction to UML,  classes and data abstraction,  inheritance,  introduction to polymorphism, abstract classes and interfaces.  Students are required to develop basic proficiency in utilizing and testing software systems related to computational sciences and in applying at least one programming language to software development. Three hours of instructorled class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS110

 

CS121 Data Structures (Credits: 3)

The course explores topics including: basic object-oriented programming principles; linear and non-linear data structures – linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, tables and graphs; dynamic memory management; design of algorithms and programs for creating and processing data structures; searching and sorting algorithms. Students are required to complete programming projects in which they design, analyze, and develop complex data structures in at least one programming language. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS120 AND CS111

 

CS130 Computer Organization (Credits: 3)

Functional organization and operation of digital computers. Coverage of assembly language; addressing, stacks, argument passing, arithmetic operations, decisions, macros, modularization, linkers, debuggers. Device drivers will be considered. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS120 OR ENGS115

 

CS131 Human Computer Interaction (HCI) (Credits: 3)

The topics include: concepts of human computer interaction, techniques for user interface design; user-centered design, interface development techniques, usability evaluation; overview of interface devices and metaphors; visual development environments, other development tools. Students should be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of software and hardware systems related to computational sciences. Students should also be able to formulate and critically assess problems and sub-tasks including identification of sources and investigative techniques related to the field.  Students are required to complete group projects in which they formulate, critically assess, and investigate problems relating to software and hardware systems.  Students will complete formal presentations in order to develop experience communicating to audiences both within and outside the discipline. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS132 Theory of Communication Networks (Credits: 3)

The course investigates several communication problems in networks; one-to-all, all-to-all, one-to-many. Specific communication models are considered by placing constraints on the sets of messages, senders, and receivers, on the network’s topology, on the rules that govern message transmissions, and on the amount of information about the network known to individual network members.  One goal is to design network structures which are inexpensive to construct yet allow fast communication. The second major goal is to design efficient communication algorithms for commonly used networks under different communication models. These require knowledge of graph theory, combinatorics, and design and analysis of algorithms.  The students are required to complete theoretical problem sets and proofs in order to develop advanced knowledge of efficient communication algorithms and combinatorial properties of certain types of networks.  Students will also complete and present in class a project based on recent research articles in order to develop advanced knowledge and research skills to formulate and investigate real research problems in the future. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS140 Mechanics (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to classical mechanics. Topics include: space and time; straight-line kinematics; motion in a plane; forces and static equilibrium; Newton’s laws; particle dynamics, with force and conservation of momentum; angular motion and conservation of angular momentum; universal gravitation and planetary motion; collisions and conservation laws; work, potential energy and conservation of energy; vibrational motion; conservative forces; inertial forces and non-inertial frames; central force motions; rigid bodies and rotational dynamics. Students are required to complete weekly problem sets in order to develop problem solving skills in Probability. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS101

 

CS201 Complex Analysis (Credits: 3)

The course examines the theory of functions of one complex variable.  The topics include complex numbers, complex functions, differentiability, Cauchy-Riemann equations, analytical functions; complex integration, the Cauchy integral formula, calculation of residues, Liouville’s theorem, the Gauss mean value theorem, the maximum modulus theorem, Rouche’s theorem, the Poisson integral formula; Taylor-Laurent series; singularity theory; analytical continuation; elliptic functions; conformal mapping, applications to ODEs and PDEs. Students are required to complete weekly problem sets and proofs in order to develop advanced knowledge of analyticalal methods.  Students will learn to utilize advanced methods to formulate, assess, and solve problems and subtasks in computational science as well as across a broad range of disciplines. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS202 Functional Analysis (Credits: 3)

The course gives an introduction to functional analysis, which is a branch of mathematics in which one develops analysis in infinite dimensional vector spaces. The main areas to be covered are normed spaces with an emphasis on Banach and Hilbert spaces. Students will be introduced to fundamental theorems related to Banach spaces: The Hahn-Banach, Fixed point, Uniform Boundedness Principle, Open Mapping and Closed Graph theorems. This course will provide also an overview of Spectral theory for compact operators with applications in integral and differential equations. Instructor-led class time including discussions and problem sets; assessment by exams and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS103

 

CS205 Partial Differential Equations (Credits: 3)

An introductory course into Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) which outlines analytical procedures for solving PDEs that arise from mathematical modeling of physical phenomena such as wave propagation, heat and mass transfer and electric potential discharge, to shape processing and motion/jump simulations in video gaming.   The class will cover different classifications and orders of PDEs such as 2nd order elliptic and 1st and 2nd order hyperbolic equations, and will be introduce corresponding solution methodologies such as the method of characteristics, separation of variables and Laplace Transforms. The course will primarily deal with analytical methods but will include a small section on numerical algorithms for solving simple PDEs. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS105

 

CS211 Introduction to Algorithms (Credits: 3)

The course surveys topics including: review of main abstract data types; sorting algorithms, correctness, space and time complexity; hashing and hash tables, collision resolution strategies; graph algorithms; divide-and-conquer algorithms, dynamic programming; NP-completeness.  Students are required to critically analyze, formulate and solve problems using analytical knowledge related to algorithms.  Students should also be able to display proficiency in designing and analyzing complex algorithms and understand the software relevant to this field. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS213 Optimization (Credits: 3)

The course explores the following topics: optimization problems; dogleg and hookstep methods; simulated annealing; approximation algorithms; introduction to game theory; scheduling; basic optimization models in financial markets; nonlinear continuous optimization; conjugate gradient methods, Newton-type methods.  Through the course, students will develop the ability to critically analyze and solve problems using advanced knowledge related to optimization and contemporary methods in optimization techniques.  Students will also develop proficiency in designing and analyzing complex data structures and algorithms.  Additionally, students are required to complete individual projects in order to develop their ability to discover and learn relevant material on their own. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS102 AND CS112

 

CS215 Cryptography (Credits: 3)

Introduction of basic principles and methods of modern applied cryptography. Demonstration how cryptography can help to solve information security problems and our focus will be basically internet security.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS211

 

CS217 Computer Graphics (Credits: 3)

The course provides students with theoretical and applied tools in graphics development. The course examines topics including: geometric concepts, such as tangent plane, normal vector; pixel-related operations; interactive methods, such as mouse and keyboard callback functions; representation of graphics primitives; general introduction to Open GL as a State Machine; various shading algorithms to illustrate the rendering process; color calculations; texturing. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS102 AND CS121

 

CS220 Parallel and High Performance Computing (Parallel HPC) (Credits: 3)

The course examines topics including: parallel hardware architectures, distributed computing paradigms, parallelization strategies and basic parallel algorithmic techniques, parallel programming with OpenMP and MPI, HPC numerical libraries. Students should be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge related to contemporary methods in parallel and HP Computing. Students are required to draw upon investigative techniques related to this field in order to critically analyze and solve problems using advanced knowledge. Coursework will require students to develop faster codes that are highly optimized for modern multi-core processors and clusters. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions, lab work and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS211

 

CS221 Distributed Systems (Credits: 3)

Distributed systems help programmers aggregate the resources of many networked computers to construct highly available and scalable services. The course covers general introductory concepts in the design and implementation of distributed systems, covering all the major branches such as Cluster Computing, Grid Computing and Cloud Computing. The main principles underlying distributed systems will be investigated: processes, communication, naming, synchronization, consistency, fault tolerance, and security. The course gives some hands-on experience as well as some theoretical background. Moreover the course will go in deep of several technical issues in cloud systems, such as Amazon EC2/S3, and Hadoop (MapReduce framework). Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS211

 

CS222 Database Systems (Credits: 3)

Introduction to databases, the Entity-Relationship (ER) Model and conceptual database design, the relational model and relational algebra (RA), SQL. Topics include data storage, indexing, and hashing; cost evaluating RA operators, query evaluation as well as transaction management, concurrency control and recovery; relational schema refinement, functional dependencies, and normalization; physical database design, database tuning; security and authorization of parallel and distributed database systems; data warehousing and decision support, views.  In addition, introduction to Data Mining and various applications will be covered. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS211

 

CS226 Math Modeling Applications (Credits: 3)

This course introduces mathematical modeling and computational techniques for the simulation of a large variety of engineering and physical systems.  The students will be able to apply real-world problem solving skills relating to modeling real-life scenarios from the natural sciences, business, social sciences, and finance. The applications for simulations are drawn from various fields and industries such as aerospace, mechanical, electrical, chemical and biological engineering, and materials science. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS205

 

CS236 Compiler Design (Credits: 3)

An introduction to the basic phases of modern compilers and their design principles. Topics covered include CPU instruction, finite state machines, lexical scanning, parsing schemes, code generation and translation, comparison of modern programming languages. As part of the course, students build a working compiler for an object-oriented language. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS130

 

CS241 Dynamical System (Credits: 3)

The course covers topics including: concepts of continuous and discrete dynamical systems; orbits, fixed points and periodic orbits; 1D and 2D maps; stability of fixed and periodic points, sinks, sources and saddles; Lyapunov exponents; chaos; linear and nonlinear systems; periodic orbits and limit sets; chaotic attractors and fractals; maps of the circle, hyperbolic dynamical systems, horseshoe maps; symbolic dynamics, topological entropy.  Students are required to solve problems in computational science utilizing concepts and methods from mathematical disciplines of mathematical modeling.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS245 Bioinformatics (Credits: 3)

This course is a brief introduction to molecular biology and investigates the main algorithms used in Bioinformatics. After a brief description of commonly used tools, algorithms, and databases in Bioinformatics, the course presents specific tasks that can be completed using combinations of the tools and Databases. The course then focuses on the algorithms behind the most successful tools, such as the local and global sequence alignment packages: BLAST, Smith-Waterman; and the underlying methods used in fragment assembly packages. The course will also be complemented by hands-on, computer lab sessions. Students will solve hands-on problems on HIV, BRCA1 gene, Thalassemia, FMF, etc. Forty-five hours of instructor-led class time.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS211

 

CS246 Artificial Intelligence: Decision Support (Credits: 3)

The course provides an introduction to decision support techniques in the context of artificial intelligence.  The main areas to be covered are knowledge representation, planning and reasoning under uncertainty. We will discuss the principles of intelligent multi-agent systems for decision support. The technical basis of the course involves logic, probability and game theory. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS107 OR IESM106

 

CS251 Machine Learning (Credits: 3)

Machine learning links together computers and statistics by teaching machines to act without human interaction. It compiles those methods of data science that automate model building process for computer realization by applying algorithms that iteratively learn from data allowing computers to find hidden insights in data without explicit programming. This course will provide the basic ideas and methods of machine learning. Topics include – supervised learning, unsupervised learning, best practices in machine learning with many examples from real-world applications. It also includes explanations on how to use the well-known R software for application of the learned techniques to practical problems. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM106 OR CS108

 

CS252 Data Science (Credits: 3)

This course aims to introduce students to the world of data science. Students will gain the skills that are transforming entire industries from healthcare to internet marketing and beyond. In this course, students will gain a hands-on introduction to using R programming language for reproducible data analysis.  Students will define the data science process, including data acquisition, data munging, exploratory data analysis, visualization and modeling real world data. The course will include using R and R packages tools for analysis of both structured and unstructured data sources, as well as writing reproducible data analysis reports with R Markdown and creating personalized interactive graphics applications. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS260 Image Processing (Credits: 3)

This course is a practical introduction to digital image processing. It covers the key methods and connects the mathematical foundations with programming implementation. Algorithmic descriptions of several approaches may include: image analysis, image representation and storage, image de-noising and restoration, compression techniques, two-dimensional discrete Fourier transform, spatial and frequency domain, linear and, optionally, nonlinear image filtering, edge detection, image segmentation and the basics of digital video processing. Instructor-led class time is supported by practical exercises and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121 AND CS211 AND CS104 AND CS112

 

CS290 Special Topics in Applied Computer Science (Credits: 3)

This course explores topics in applied computer science with emphasis on current technologies and approaches. Topics to be announced prior to course registration. Instructor-led class time.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS296 Capstone (Credits: 3)

This course provides computer science majors the opportunity to develop the knowledge that they have obtained from across the curriculum. Students are encouraged to work in teams, and can choose either a theory or applied project. Students will select a topic from their respective tracks and work on the course-long project under the mentorship of the advising instructor. Students will discuss each other’s projects at scheduled weekly meetings led by the instructor. At the end of the course the projects will be presented and demonstrated orally and the project reports will be submitted in writing.  Students are required to formulate and critically assess problems and sub-tasks including identifying sources and conducting independent research.  Students should likewise be able to demonstrate expertise in core domains and in contemporary computing technologies.  Students are required to produce technical documentation with references and demonstrate the capacity to discover and learn new material through independent research.  Students are also required to draw upon critical thinking skills in a broad context and work as part of a team. BREAKStudents choosing applied projects participate in the identification of a problem, develop a project proposal outlining an approach to the problem’s solution, implement the proposed solution, and test or evaluate the result. Students choosing a theory project conduct original research (e.g., develop a new algorithm) and evaluate its strengths and limitations. Regardless of the choice of project, students document their work in the form of written reports and oral presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS299 Independent Study (Credits: 1)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS302 Functional Analysis (Credits: 3)

The course gives an introduction to functional analysis, which is a branch of mathematics in which one develops analysis in infinite dimensional vector spaces. The main areas to be covered are normed spaces with an emphasis on Banach and Hilbert spaces. Students will be introduced to fundamental theorems related to Banach spaces: The Hahn-Banach, Fixed point, Uniform Boundedness Principle, Open Mapping and Closed Graph theorems. This course will provide also an overview of Spectral theory for compact operators with applications in integral and differential equations. Instructor-led class time including discussions and problem sets; assessment by exams and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS103

 

CS310 Theory of Computing (Credits: 3)

Theory of computation comprises the fundamental mathematical properties of computer hardware, software, and applications. This theory deals with computational models (or abstract machines) and investigates computational power of these models. The finite automata, pushdown automata and Turing machines are the computational models that are widely used in applications and theoretical research. This course aims to provide students with a foundation for using these models both for practical and theoretical needs.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS311 Theory of Algorithms (Credits: 3)

Review of main abstract data types. Sorting algorithms: correctness, space and time complexity. Graph algorithms. Algorithmic Paradigms: divide-and-conquer, greedy, dynamic programming. NP-completeness and approximation algorithms.   The course aims at providing students with the tools and techniques for designing efficient algorithms.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS312 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (Credits: 3)

The UP (Unified Process) and the principle of iterative and incremental software development,  UP artifacts,  usage of UML (Unified Modeling Language) notation for representation results of analysis and design,  studying and applying of design patterns,  usage of CASE (ComputerAssisted Software Engineering) tools to aid in analysis and design.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS313 Advanced Topics in Algorithms (Credits: 3)

This course will review basic paradigms of algorithm design such as divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, graph algorithms; and then explore some of the more advance topics such as Network Flow and Bipartite Matchings, NP-completeness, Approximation Algorithms, and other selected topics. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS311

 

CS314 Theory of Communication Networks (Credits: 3)

The course investigates several communication problems in networks; one-to- all, all-to- all, one-to- many. Specific communication models are considered by placing constraints on the sets of messages, senders, and receivers, on the network’s topology, on the rules that govern message transmissions, and on the amount of information about the network known to individual network members.  One goal is to design network structures which are inexpensive to construct yet allow fast communication. The second major goal is to design efficient communication algorithms for commonly used networks under different communication models. These require knowledge of graph theory, combinatorics, and design and analysis of algorithms.  Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS315 Cryptography (Credits: 3)

Introduction of basic principles and methods of modern applied cryptography. Demonstration how cryptography can help to solve information security problems and our focus will be basically internet security. Students will learn to understand and evaluate real life security problems that cryptography can solve. They will also discuss various open problems in applied cryptography.  Finally, students will implement cryptographic primitives used in common real applications. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS316 Advanced Cryptography (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce alternative, more efficient, and non- traditional public-key cryptosystems. Students will get acquainted with white box cryptography essentials. Other topics to be covered: a) cryptographic primitives related to cloud computing, in particular a secure search over encrypted data; b) homomorphic encryption methods; c) identity based encryption; and d) secure multi-party computation protocols. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS315

 

CS317 Computer Graphics (Credits: 3)

The course provides students with theoretical and applied tools in graphics development. The course examines topics including: geometric concepts, such as tangent plane, normal vector; pixel-related operations; interactive methods, such as mouse and keyboard callback functions; representation of graphics primitives; general introduction to Open GL as a State Machine; various shading algorithms to illustrate the rendering process; color calculations; texturing. Coursework will include such assignments as critical review of current trends in the field, implementations of theories, or group projects.  Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS102 AND CS121

 

CS318 Advanced Topics in the Theory of Computation (Credits: 3)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS319 Computer Vision (Credits: 3)

This course offers an introduction to Computer Vision, an emerging interdisciplinary field that includes methods for acquiring, processing, analyzing of digital images and videos and extracting useful information from them. Students will learn basic methods that include exploring known models in image representations, depth recovery from stereo, camera calibration, image stabilization, automated alignment, tracking, edge detection, and pattern recognition. They will also develop statistical models for image classification, clustering, and dimensionality reduction. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS108

 

CS322 Software Engineering (Credits: 3)

Software life cycle processes including analysis, design, modifying and documenting large software systems. Topics include software development paradigms, system engineering, function-based analysis and design, and object-oriented analysis and design. Students will implement a working software system in a team environment.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS323 Advanced Object-Oriented Programming (Credits: 3)

Basic principles of object oriented analysis and design utilizing UML, advanced object oriented programming principles, design patterns, frameworks and toolkits; Agile software design processes. Development of a mid-size programming project working in teams..

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS325 Development of Geo-Collaborative Applications (Credits: 2)

The students acquire basic knowledge for developing web-based geo-collaborative application for supporting decision making processes. Students learn the basic concepts of cartography and the most common client and server side programming resources which are used for web-based geo-collaborative application development. Students have to solve small tasks during classes as well as develop a mid-size programming project working in teams. They learn to integrate the most common free maps resources (Google Maps and Open Layers) and geographic data sources (Open Street Maps) in their application as well as free available geographic database (PostGis). Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS326 Database Systems (Credits: 3)

Introduction to databases, the Entity-Relationship (ER) Model and conceptual database design, the relational model and relational algebra (RA), SQL. Topics include data storage, indexing, and hashing; cost evaluating RA operators, query evaluation as well as transaction management, concurrency control and recovery; relational schema refinement, functional dependencies, and normalization; physical database design, database tuning; security and authorization of parallel and distributed database systems; data warehousing and decision support, views.  In addition, introduction to Data Mining and various applications will be covered. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS311

 

CS327 Parallel and High-Performance Computing (Parallel HPC) (Credits: 3)

The course examines topics including: parallel hardware architectures, distributed computing paradigms, parallelization strategies and basic parallel algorithmic techniques, parallel programming with OpenMP and MPI, HPC numerical libraries. Students should be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge related to contemporary methods in parallel and HP Computing. Students are required to draw upon investigative techniques related to this field in order to critically analyze and solve problems using advanced knowledge. Coursework will require students to develop faster codes that are highly optimized for modern multi-core processors and clusters. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions, lab work and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS311

 

CS328 Human Computer Interaction (Credits: 3)

The topics include: concepts of human computer interaction, techniques for user interface design; user-centered design, interface development techniques, usability evaluation; overview of interface devices and metaphors; visual development environments, other development tools. Students should be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of software and hardware systems related to computational sciences. Students should also be able to formulate and critically assess problems and sub-tasks including identification of sources and investigative techniques related to the field. Students are required to complete group projects in which they formulate, critically assess, and investigate problems relating to software and hardware systems. Masters students will complete formal presentations commensurate with their knowledge level in order to develop experience communicating to audiences both within and outside the discipline. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS329 Data Warehousing (Credits: 3)

An advanced hands-on course in Data Warehousing which will build upon knowledge gained in an introductory course in Databases. Topics covered include Data Warehouse architectures, multidimensional data representation and manipulation, Data Warehouse design practices and methodologies, creation of Extract-Transformation-Load (ETL) workflows, with emphasis on data governance practices, business intelligence concepts and platform capabilities, and visualization tools. Instructor-led hands-on laboratory class time with assessment based on discussions, problem sets, projects, and significant in-laboratory applications.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS222 OR CS326 OR IESM301

 

CS331 Operating Systems (Credits: 3)

The organization and structure of modern operating systems. System level programming in Windows and Unix Operating Systems.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS332 System Administration (Credits: 3)

User administration. Operating system installation, tuning and control. Network administration. Security management. Performance tuning and management.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS331

 

CS333 Network Programming (Credits: 3)

Students will acquire skills for developing distributed applications running over TCP/IP networks. Students learn the basic concepts of networking client-server programming as well as advanced topics such as concurrent serving, state vs. non-state servers, multicasting, peer-to- peer architectures. Instructor led in-class projects, and development of a mid-size programming team project.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS334 Performance Analysis and Queueing Theory (Credits: 3)

The course reviews basics of probability theory, stochastic processes, especially Markov chains, and Laplace and z-transforms before proceeding with the analysis of queueing systems. After introducing basic laws of queueing theory, such as Little’s result, the analysis of single- and multi-server quueing systems is dicsussed. Also product-form open and closed queueing network models and efficient methods for their analysis: the convolution algorithm and mean-value analysis. Principles of descrete simulation methods are discussed to deal with systems not lending themselves to queueing analysis. The emphasis of the course is gaining insight into the behavior of systems with various workloads.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS335 Introduction to EDA (Credits: 3)

Structure of modern VLSI chips. Basic understanding of VLSI device manufacturing process. Overview VLSI chip design flow, including the System-Level design and interaction with SW and FW development process and teams. Understanding of modern SoC architectures: FW, SW, HW levels. Specifics for Analog-mixed-signal, CPU/RAM and other HW fabrics, and ASIC. Overview of digital circuits, standard cells. Digital design, standard-cell design. Overview of the Front-end and back-end. Detailed review of the back-end design phases. Introduction to EDA tools SW architecture: data layer, user-interface, algorithmic layer. Introduction to basic design patterns and architectures for DB and UI design for EDA tools. Overview of algorithms and data structures used in EDA. Detailed overview of back-end problems, and their corresponding mathematical problem formulations from combinatorial optimization, computational geometry, mathematical programming. Detailed study on concrete examples. Overview of simulation and analysis techniques. Detailed study of concrete examples.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS336 Compiler Design (Credits: 3)

An introduction to the basic phases of modern compilers and their design principles. Topics covered include CPU instruction, finite state machines, lexical scanning, parsing schemes, code generation and translation, comparison of modern programming languages, and an analysis of the relationship between compilers and operating systems. As part of the course, students build a working compiler for an object-oriented language. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS130

 

CS338 Distributed Systems (Credits: 3)

Distributed systems help programmers aggregate the resources of many networked computers to construct highly available and scalable services. The course covers general introductory concepts in the design and implementation of distributed systems, covering all the major branches such as Cluster Computing, Grid Computing and Cloud Computing. The main principles underlying distributed systems will be investigated: processes, communication, naming, synchronization, consistency, fault tolerance, and security. The course gives some hands-on experience as well as some theoretical background. Moreover the course will go in deep of several technical issues in cloud systems, such as Amazon EC2/S3, and Hadoop (MapReduce framework). Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS311

 

CS340 Machine Learning (Credits: 3)

Machine learning links together computers and statistics by teaching machines to act without human interaction. It compiles those methods of data science that automate model building process for computer realization by applying algorithms that iteratively learn from data allowing computers to find hidden insights in data without explicit programming. This course will provide the basic ideas and methods of machine learning. Topics include – supervised learning, unsupervised learning, best practices in machine learning with many examples from real-world applications. It also includes explanations on how to use the well-known R software for application of the learned techniques to practical problems. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS342 Data Science with R (Credits: 3)

This course aims to introduce students to the world of data science. Students will gain the skills that are transforming entire industries from healthcare to internet marketing and beyond. In this course, students will gain a hands-on introduction to using R programming language for reproducible data analysis.  Students will define the data science process, including data acquisition, data munging, exploratory data analysis, visualization and modeling real world data. The course will include using R and R packages tools for analysis of both structured and unstructured data sources, as well as writing reproducible data analysis reports with R Markdown and creating personalized interactive graphics applications. Coursework will include such assignments as critical review of current trends in the field, implementations of theories, or group projects.  Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS343 Data Visulaisation (Credits: 3)

Visualization is increasingly important in this era where the use of big data is growing in many different fields. This course is designed to introduce methodologies and tools for transforming the data into interesting and insightful visual representations, including interactive web visualizations.  Students will learn basic visualization design and evaluation tools and techniques, and learn how to acquire, parse, and analyze large datasets. Students will also learn techniques for visualizing multivariate, temporal, text-based, geospatial, hierarchical, and network/graph-based data. Additionally, students will utilize tools such as R and ggplot2 to prototype many of these techniques on existing datasets. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS108

 

CS345 Bioinformatics (Credits: 3)

The course starts with a brief introduction to molecular biology. The course then investigates the main algorithms used in Bioinformatics. After a brief description of commonly used tools, algorithms, and databases in Bioinformatics, the course describes specific tasks that can be completed using combinations of the tools and Databases. The course then focuses on the algorithms behind the most successful tools, such as the local and global sequence alignment packages: BLAST, SmithWaterman,  and the underlying methods used in fragment assembly packages.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS346 Artificial Intelligence and Decision Support (Credits: 3)

This course provides an introduction to decision support techniques in the context of artificial intelligence.  The main areas to be covered are knowledge-based agents, planning, reasoning under uncertainty and decision theory. Students will learn the principles of intelligent agent-based systems and implement agent programs that show rational behavior. Students will also learn logic programming. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS107

 

CS347 Knowledge Representation (Credits: 3)

Knowledge representation (KR) is the study of how knowledge about the world can be represented in a computer system and what kinds of reasoning can be done with that knowledge. BREAKChallenges of KR and reasoning are representation of commonsense knowledge, the ability of a knowledge-based system to tradeoff computational efficiency for accuracy of inferences, and its ability to represent and manipulate uncertain knowledge and information.BREAKThis course will provide an overview of existing representational frameworks developed within AI, their key concepts and inference methods.BREAKIt will also discuss some non-classical logical frameworks, such as non-monotonic logics.BREAKOne of the objectives of the course is to help students understand how the theoretical material covered in the course is currently being applied in practice.BREAKInstructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS350 Software Project Management (Credits: 3)

Methods and procedures for managing a software development project. Includes notions of project planning,  time, cost and resource estimation,  project organizational types, staffing (team assembly) and training considerations, leading and motivating computer personnel, and methods for monitoring and controlling the progress of a project. Quality management and risk assessment are considered. Case Studies of successes and failures will be studied.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS355 Entrepreneurship (Credits: 3)

Seminar exploring the complexities of creating and sustaining an entrepreneurial venture. We concentrate on the impact of innovative behavior and its implication to decision making. The primary focus of the course is on the behaviors involved in forming new enterprises: recognizing and evaluating opportunities,  developing a network of support,  building an organization,  acquiring resources,  identifying customers,  estimating demand,  selling, writing and presenting a business plan,  and exploring the ethical issues entrepreneurs face. The course consists of case studies and discussion, inclass exercises, readings, guest speakers, and an outside project.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS360 Computational Methods (Credits: 3)

The course will cover topics including: matrix norms and iterative methods for linear systems and eigenvalue problems, numerical solutions of nonlinear equations and systems, numerical optimization methods, interpolation and approximation of functions, numerical quadrature rules, numerical methods for ODE’s. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS361 Advanced Statistical Modeling (Credits: 3)

The course will cover the fundamentals of advanced statistical modeling. Topics include: linear and nonlinear regression, goodness of fit tests, generalized linear models, Bayesian inference and hypothesis testing, nonparametric inference and bootstrap. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS108

 

CS362 Time Series Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course will provide a systematic account of linear time series models and their application to the modelling and prediction of data collected sequentially in time. The topics covered include: difference equations, lag operators, stationary ARMA processes, forecasting, maximum likelihood estimation, spectral analysis, linear regression models, Kalman filter, and Fourier transform methods. Students will apply these methods to solve practical problems in signal processing, statistics, and economics. Three hours of instructor-led class per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS108

 

CS363 Stochastic Models (Credits: 3)

The course will cover topics including: Conditional Probability and Conditional Expectation, Markov chains, Hidden Markov Models, Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, introduction to Poisson Processes and Queueing Models. Instructor-led discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS108

 

CS364 Game Theory (Credits: 3)

The course introduces the major concepts and paradigms of game theory, a domain which explores strategic interactions among several players which determine the outcome of the game.  Students will explore how to achieve favorable outcomes arising from the modeling, analysis and prediction of player behavior, with a strong focus on the mathematical models of the game dynamics.  Game Theory has numerous applications in Economics, Political Science, Social Science, Evolutionary Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, and everyday life situations.  Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, software implementation, exams, and projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS107

 

CS370 Programming Paradigms (Credits: 3)

The course will cover key principles and structures related to programming.  Topics include design patterns, generic programming, an overview of the C++ Standard Template Library, functional programming, logic programming, with examples and implementation using different programming languages to illustrate uses and functionality of different paradigms which are explored. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, programming design projects and software implementation, and examinations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS312

 

CS371 Image Processing (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to digital image processing. The course covers topics including: image analysis, Image representation and storage, image de-noising and restoration, compression techniques, two-dimensional discrete Fourier transform, spatial and frequency domain, linear and nonlinear image filtering, edge detection, image segmentation, and basics of digital videoBREAKprocessing. Graduate students are expected to complete an individual or group project during the semester. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problemBREAKsets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS375 Information Visualizations (Credits: 3)

Transforming data into knowledge is a multi-step process which can include data cleanup, exploring the relationships between datasets, interpretation, and demonstrating the results using graphics, interactive tools and online dashboards. The course will include hands-on sessions using open source software for the rapid crafting of visualization of many different data types. Students will also analyze large datasets to discover patterns and structures and derive insight into large volumes of data. Through the development of visualization techniques and tools, students will be better positioned to comprehend and convey insights. Instructor-led class discussions with assessment based on participation, problem sets, projects, and exams.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS121

 

CS390 Capstone Practicum (Credits: 3)

Students will complete an 8-12 hour per week industry work experience in a computer-relatedBREAKposition. Students will be supervised by assigned personnel at the field site and/or by a program-basedBREAKinstructor. Hours are arranged by mutual consent of the student and employer. Students are required to report periodically to the course instructor, maintain a log of on-the-job activities, and submit a final report regarding the practicum experience.  No additional class time is required.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS391 Independent Study (Credits: 3)

Special study of a particular problem under the direction of a faculty member. The student must present a written, detailed report of the work accomplished.  Approval of the CIS Program Chair and the instructor is required.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS395 Capstone Preparation (Credits: 3)

The course is designed to prepare students to work on their Master’s capstone. Students will learn of prospective research thesis topics, do literature surveys which will become part of their final capstone report, select their supervisor, and submit an approved capstone proposal. Topics covered will include research methodology in computer science, plagiarism and academic integrity, basics on how to write a technical paper, give a technical talk, search for a job, write a CV and cover letter, interview skills. Instructor-led discussions and presentations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CS396 Capstone-Thesis Writing (Credits: 3)

Students will complete an individual thesis which serves as part of the capstone requirement for the degree.  The thesis proposal is presented as part of the CS395 requirements and must be approved by the supervisory committee. Upon completion, the capstone thesis must be successfully presented to the program in an open forum and be approved by the supervisory committee.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS395

 

 

CSE111 The Scientific Method and Critical Thinking (Credits: 3)

Science and technology proficiency is indispensable for functioning in modern societies. We are overwhelmed with instant information in all sensory formats and we must be able to discriminate between facts and fallacies, while recognizing our own underlying biases. In this course, the student is introduced to the basic tenets of the scientific method, critical thinking and illustrated real world examples and case studies, with several general topics examined in depth. Such topics includes: pharmaceutical studies, computer performance claims, climate change, emerging technologies, marketing and advertisement, international relations, political and partisan hyperbole.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CSE112 Mathematical Thinking (Credits: 3)

Students will explore and develop quantitative analysis and numeracy skills, rooted in logic-based intuition, that are essential to succeed regardless of profession.  In this course, students will expand critical thinking skills in the context of understanding and analyzing data and presenting findings/conclusions through the practical application of mathematical theories, principles and techniques rooted in algebra, calculus, probability and statistics in subjects such as demographics, finance, medicine, politics and economics.  Through the use of advanced Microsoft Excel functions and formulas, students will expand problem-solving skills.  Students will prepare oral and written reports that utilize concepts of the effective visual display of quantitative information to optimize how to summarize and explain mathematical solutions that emphasize clear and effective communication.  Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CSE120 Introduction to the World of Programming (Credits: 3)

This course covers the topics related to the role of computers in our everyday life. Topics include high level overview of: history of computers, the architecture of personal computers, mobile devices and other smart gadgets, the structure of internet and cloud, search engines, data storages, data analytics tools, information management tools and information security. Students will learn to write basic programs, implement basic algorithms, collect and store data, browse the data in the web with smart search engines and which is very important understand the key areas of information security. This course is designed for students with no prior background of computer science. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, and practical assignments.

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Prerequisite:

 

CSE130 Technology Marketing (Credits: 3)

This course covers marketing from the perspective of high technology products, services, and industries. Students will learn the process of introducing and explaining how relatively complex products or technologies work: writing collateral, white papers, presentations, competitive market analysis, technical intelligence analysis, and how to develop an integrated digital marketing strategy. This course is for students with technical or non-technical backgrounds who wish to understand marketing in technological ecosystems. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, presentations, exams, and projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CSE131 Industrial Technologies (Credits: 3)

The course will explore several industrial technologies, with an aim for students to familiarize themselves with both traditional as well as modern innovative business practices.  Examples of these industrial technologies may include metallurgy, construction industry, chemical production, lighting technologies, semiconductor manufacturing and other cutting edge “technologies of tomorrow.”  While no prior experience or knowledge of these technologies is expected, students will gain firsthand exposure to real production processes and appreciation of product lifecycles including environmental and technological. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, essays, exams, and projects.

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CSE141 Introduction to Data (Credits: 3)

The goal of the course is to present the basic concepts of data analytics, starting from the basics of descriptive statistics and ending with applications of text mining. Students will learn how the statistics is used to model uncertainty, discover patterns in data and make actionable decisions. Basic methods of statistical inference and predictive modeling will be covered. The models and methods will be applied in different fields such as business, social sciences, health care, sports, etc. We will use open source analytical software R in doing statistical calculations. No prior knowledge in programming or experience with R is necessary for the course.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS110 OR CS100 OR CHSS183

 

CSE145 Geographic Information Systems (Credits: 3)

This course is meant to introduce students to geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial analysis: setting up, analysing, visualizing, and solving problems using data and maps. With advancements in the information technologies more and more industries are relying on GIS to analyse and visualize data. This course will look at applications of GIS in environmental sciences, public health, sustainable transportation planning, land use mapping, telecommunications, hydrology, meteorology, police dispatching, crime patterns, etc. The course will also look at remote sensing technologies like radar, LiDAR, GPS, and the role they play in collecting and analysing data. Another aim of this course is to spark interest in different types of students: from students interested in learning about GIS, to future professionals in fields regularly using GIS, to data enthusiasts and software developers. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CSE150 Cybersecurity Essentials (Credits: 3)

This course explores and introduces the basic concepts of cybersecurity and their relationship to information and network security. The course covers aspects of cyber-crime, security principles, technologies, and procedures to defend networks against these various threats. Through interactive, multimedia content, lab activities, and multi-industry case studies, students build technical and contextual skills to appreciate various aspects of cybersecurity in their personal and professional lives. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, exams, and projects.

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CSE151 Introduction to Energy Sources (Credits: 3)

Energy drives the human civilization, and any economic growth or poverty alleviation directly involves use of energy resources. This course serves as an introduction to various sources of energy and the mechanisms to harness and convert them to more useful types of energy. Fossil fueled, solar, hydro and nuclear sources and some of their effects on the environment and safety issues will be discussed. This course fulfills general education requirements of the American University of Armenia. There are no prerequisites for this course beyond basic mathematical skills. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

CSE162 Introduction to Bioscience and its Impact on Research Business and Society (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to important concepts, techniques and applications of bioscience, and explores its impact on research, business and society.  Students will study basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, computational biology and biotechnology.  Some important applications of molecular and cellular biology in medicine and industry – such as molecular diagnostics of diseases, stem cell and transplantation, drug design and genetically modified foods – will be introduced.  Students will also discuss the political, ethical, and legal issues accompanying these topics and their current and future impact on society. Three hours of instructorled class time per week.

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Prerequisite:

 

CSE165 Introduction to Chemistry (Credits: 3)

This course aims to build knowledge of general chemistry required to understand links between chemical research and health science. Nowadays chemistry helps to solve many problems arising in the world. Chemists frequently get inspiration from living things to design new medications, safer chemical reactions and to solve environmental problems arising from human activities. Students will attend lectures and engage in group work on basic chemistry topics. Students will also engage in literature research and interpretation aiming to develop the skills necessary to read and understand research on toxicology, modern developments in chemistry linked to and/or inspired from living things. At the end of the semester, students will present projects on chemistry and health topics. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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Prerequisite:

 

CSE171 Conceptual Physics (Credits: 3)

This course will explore the basic concepts in physics and physical processes.  The conceptual viewpoint taken in the course will focus more on the physical description of the processes and phenomena rather than the detailed mathematical equations that govern them.  The course will cover topics in mechanics of moving bodies, heat transfer, propagation of sound, properties of light, electricity and magnetism with special emphasis on everyday experience and practical illustrations taken from real life, e.g. art, music, sports, the home.  For each of the processes covered in the course, a brief historical perspective will be given, followed by a description of its physical principles, and finally the basic equations that describe it mathematically. Students will be exposed to real-life applications of the theories discussed in the classroom.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CSE175 Relativity (Credits: 3)

The course explains Einstein’s Theory of Relativity without requiring science background. The explanation of the theory demands no prior knowledge of mathematics or physics beyond an ability to do simple arithmetic. The first portion of the course introduces some of the main concepts of the theory and discusses experimental tests by using no more than arithmetic and simple geometry. The further progress requires algebra and more advanced mathematical techniques. The concepts are explained in a way accessible to beginners, i.e. those without a background on physics. Three hours of intruction-led class time per week.

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Prerequisite:

 

CSE181 Creativity and Technological Innovation (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to creativity and its elements, the creative mind and thinking, techniques, concepts and applications leading to technological innovations. Lectures will provide examples of creative thinking and technological innovations from real life creators and technology innovators whose work is well known. Students will work in groups. Each group will create a technological project attempting to solve a real life need based on the knowledge gained and discussed during the semester. Students will be introduced to various problem-solving techniques. Upon completion of this couse, students will be able to think creatively and they will be familiar with the process of technological innovation and innvention.  Three hours of intruction-led class time per week.

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CSE190 Engineering for non-Engineers (Credits: 3)

This course aims to give students an insight about basic principles of engineering and its different sub-disciplines. The course will explore the role engineering has played in shaping society today through its various advancements in different fields, e.g. manufacturing, the energy sector, urban development and materials engineering. Student evaluation will be based on individual or group projects, research essays and written examinations. Instructor-led class time.

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CSE210 Historical Development of Mathematical Ideas (Credits: 3)

This course will provide an exploration into the history, birth and development of mathematical ideas, problems and people behind them. A variety of topics will be covered, such as: infinity and paradoxes; numbers and set theory; algebraic equations and algebra; limits and calculus; shapes, symmetry and geometry; gambling, uncertainty and probability; physics and differential equations; choice and game theory; data analysis and statistics. Students are required to complete problem sets and quizzes, and to complete a group project, as well to conduct collaborative research. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

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CSE220 Tomorrow’s Technologies (Credits: 3)

What is technology? Why it is so crucial to constantly improve or develop new theories based on observation and apply scientific methods toward the creation of innovative products. How are scientific theories developed? Regarding the creation process, what is the role of engineers, of society and of government? In this course students will deepen their understanding of design and development of cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, such as quantum computers, organic displays, and artificially-grown materials. Applications of these new technologies are poised to revolutionize industries such as health care, energy use, and consumer goods. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments, projects, and exams.

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CSE221 Nanotechnology: Science and Application (Credits: 3)

Nanotechnology: Science and Application is a multidisciplinary course which presents an overview of the main aspects of the emerging field of Nanotechnology. Students will become acquainted with a set of disciplines which form the scientific basis upon which Nanotechnology research and applications are developing. Students will also gain familiarity with examples of nanotechnology applications in evolved or emerging industries, such as agriculture, consumer goods, aerospace, electronics, etc. The course covers basic principles from the fields of physics, chemistry, and engineering to enable students to implement a synthesizing project. There are no prerequisites other than high-school level mathematics and physical/natural science. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, essays, exams, and projects.

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CSE241 Data Mining (Credits: 3)

The goal of the course is to present the basic concepts of data analytics, starting from the basics of descriptive BREAKstatistics and ending with applications of text mining. Students will learn how the statistics is used to model uncertainty, discover patterns in data and make actionable decisions. Basic methods of statistical inference and predictive modeling will be covered. At the end of the class several advanced methods of data mining (boosting trees and neural networks) will be presented. The models and methods will be applied in different fields such as business, social sciences, health care, sports, etc. We will use open source analytical software R in doing statistical calculations. The students will also learn how to participate in world’s leading data mining competitions. No prior knowledge in programming or experience with R is necessary for the course. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CSE262 Quantitative Biology (Credits: 3)

Biology has long been considered a descriptive science with few components in research methods.  Since the discovery of the DNA structure and advances in genetics and biotechnology, biology has evolved into an exact and quantitative science.  Today, biology uses tools adapted from statistics, mathematics, big data management systems and high performance computing.  This course presents state-of-the-art computational biology, provides hands-on experience with tools and approaches for scientific computing in biology, and discusses current and upcoming challenges of transforming biological data into biological knowledge.

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CSE263 Human Physiology (Credits: 3)

This course aims to build knowledge regarding the interrelationship between the nine organ systems responsible for the healthy functioning of the human body. Analysis will encompass from cells and tissues to the entire organism, underpinning the role of major structures supporting physiological processes. Important diseases will be discussed, including their causes and consequences as examples of disturbed homeostasis and dysfunction of human body systems.  Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

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CSE264 The Human Brain (Credits: 3)

The course will cover an introduction to the brain anatomy and the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. The work of human brain in health and in some disorders as well as the mechanisms of vision, learning, memory, feelings and emotions will be discussed.  BREAKApplications of the knowledge may be relevant in a variety of realms including for marketing specialists, user interface and software developers as well as public policy makers and educators.  Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

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CSE270 Sports Analytics (Credits: 3)

Professional sport organizations are using analytics to make better decisions on team formation, playing strategy etc. Enthusiasts use analytics to predict the outcome of a sporting event and to try to quantify reasons that lead to victory. The course will examine how different statistical and data analytics methods can be used to analyze game-day (in-play) sports data and for pre- and post-game sports performance modelling. We will focus on several team games, e.g. soccer, basketball, American football and baseball. The course will use a statistical programming language such as R and assessment may include problem sets, individual or group projects and written examinations. Instructor led class time.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS110 OR CS108 OR CSE241

 

CSE271 Number Statistics and the Environment (Credits: 3)

The course is a practical introduction to general quantitative and statistical techniques that can be applied to geography and environmental studies. Students will learn techniques to verify quality of data, analyzing trends and tendencies, and estimating probability of outcomes. The course will also cover topics such as proposing and verifying hypotheses using numbers and statistical analysis. Each topic will begin with an introduction to a numerical or statistical concept followed by the application of that concept on a real world environmental problem. As the course progresses, students will also be introduced to software that utilizes these concepts. Problem sets and written examinations.  Instructor led class time.

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CSE281 Design Thinking (Credits: 3)

Design Thinking is a way of approaching problems, a method used by designers for ideation and development that has a wide range of applications. BREAKThe tools and methods in this course include a set of creative strategies and borrow from a variety of disciplines, including ethnography, computer science, psychology and organizational learning, all to drive innovation. This course is focused on the tools and strategies needed for reframing challenges in human-centric ways, encouraging the designer to focus on what’s most important for clients, users & customers. Students will engage in the design process, create prototypes, test ideas, plan and conduct effective design research, make and use storyboards to communicate design concepts. Instructor-led discussion, along with readings, written assignments, and team-projects.

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CSE285 How Things Work (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to detailed explanations behind the theory, function, and operation of selected technologies, answering the question, How does that work? This is a course in the physical and technological innovations in everyday life employing a minimum of mathematics. It explores the principles of automobiles, propulsion, digital media, cellular technologies, cyber security, nuclear and solar power generation, computer systems, etc. In-class demonstrations will aid in demystifying many topics. Lectures will look inside products from our daily lives to see what scientific principles make them work, focusing on their principles of operation, histories and relationships to one another. Students will work individually, and additionally, present to the class as a group on an emerging technology. The course will be split into three themes: The Digital World, Power and Energy, and Daily Motion.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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CSE290 Start-Up Culture (Credits: 3)

This course provides practical proven tools for transforming an idea into a product or service that creates value for people. As students acquire these tools, they will learn how to differentiate between good and bad ideas, how to build a winning strategy, how to shape a unique value proposition, design a business model, compare the innovation to existing solutions, build flexibility into a plan and determine when best to quit. This course guides students through the process of actively validating ideas in the market. Students are encouraged to identify and communicate good opportunities and to create and capture value from those. Students will receive feedback that systematically tests different parts of their business idea and develop confidence in pitching ideas to investors and customers. Instructor led discussions and lectures; assessment through projects, exams, assignments, and presentations.

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CSE291 Introduction to Product Design (Credits: 3)

An introduction to 3D design techniques and graphics communication tools necessary for a product design. Students learn 3D modeling, assembling, mechanism design, and simulation tools via Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) company’s online tutorials and demonstrations. Through number of lectures they learn also basic product design communication tools – drawing standards, units, projection views, dimensioning, sections, etc. The knowledge acquired during the course will help students transform their ideas to Computer-Aided Design 3D models and drawings. Also, they will be prepared to apply these powerful design tools in further more advanced courses and their work practice. The evaluation will be done through PTC Precision Learning portal self-assessment questions, home assignments and product design project.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS100 OR BUS109 OR ENGS101

 

CSE292 Building a Learning Organization (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce the underlying principles that individuals, teams and organizations can acknowledge and implement in order to achieve continuous and sustainable development. The course will use Systems Thinking and analysis of cases studies from companies worldwide to provide an understanding of events that develop or destroy companies, markets, teams and individuals. By appreciating the underlying processes that can cause success or failure, students will be equipped with tools and methods to analyze interdependencies between people, their decisions and the corresponding consequences. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, essays, exams, and projects.

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Prerequisite:

 

 

DS115 Data Structures/Algorithms in Data Science (Credits: 4)

The data structures part of the course will give students the knowledge to implement their algorithms using procedural and functional programming techniques and their associated data structures, including lists, vectors, data frames, dictionaries, trees, and graphs. The part of the courses dedicated to algorithms will help students to develop the skill set to understand the problem, break it into manageable pieces, assess alternative problem-solving strategies and arrive at an algorithm that efficiently solves the given problem. Class examples and homework will help students to apply the knowledge in data science domain.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: DS120 AND CS111

 

DS120 Programming for Data Science (Credits: 3)

The course covers fundamentals of programming for data science such as classes, methods, procedures, control structures, functions, arrays, strings, scoping. The course will emphasize the use of programming essentials for data science-related tasks, such as working with dataframes, numeric calculations with vectors and lists, etc. The course will make use of programming languages widely used in data science such as Python and R. Three hours of instructor led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS110

 

 

ENGS101 Calculus: Single Variable (Credits: 4)

This introductory calculus course for engineering students covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, with applications. Topics include Concepts of Function, Limits and Continuity, Differentiation Rules, Application to Graphing, Rates, Approximations, and Extremum Problems, Definite and Indefinite Integration, The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Applications to Geometry: Area, Volume, and Arc Length, Applications to Science: Average Values, Work, and Probability, Techniques of Integration, and Approximation of Definite Integrals, Improper Integrals, and L’Hôspital’s Rule. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS102 Calculus: Multi Variable (Credits: 4)

This calculus course builds on topics covered in Calculus: Single Variable, encompassing vector and multi-variable calculus. Topics include power series and their expansions, partial differentiation and multiple integration with applications, vectors, and vector-valued functions. Line and surface integrals are introduced along with their application to concepts of work and flux, and studied by means of the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS101

 

ENGS103 Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (Credits: 4)

This course introduces students to linear algebra and ordinary differential equations (ODEs), including general numerical approaches to solving systems of equations. Topics include linear systems of equations, existence and uniqueness of solutions, Gaussian elimination, initial value problems, 1st and 2nd order systems, forward and backward Euler, and the Runge-Kutta method (RK4).  The course also covers eigenproblems: eigenvalues and eigenvectors, including complex numbers, functions, vectors and matrices.  Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS102

 

ENGS104 Probability and Statistics (Credits: 3)

The topics covered in this introductory course include: axioms of probability; conditional probability, independence; combinatorial analysis; random variables and distributions; expectation, variance, covariance; transformation of random variables; limit theorems, the law of large numbers, the central limit theorem; Markov chains; applications; statistical estimation; correlation, regression; hypothesis testing, maximum likelihood estimation, Bayesian updating; applications. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS102

 

ENGS110 Introduction to Programming (Credits: 4)

This course covers the fundamental elements of imperative programming languages (variables, assignments, conditional statements, loops, procedures, pointers, recursion), simple data structures (lists, trees) and fundamental algorithms (searching, sorting).  Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS115 Data Structures and Algorithms (Credits: 3)

The course explores topics including: basic object-oriented programming principles; linear and non-linear data structures – linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, tables and graphs; dynamic memory management; design of algorithms and programs for creating and processing data structures; searching and sorting algorithms. Students are required to complete programming projects in which they design, analyze, and develop complex data structures in at least one programming language. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS111 AND ENGS110

 

ENGS121 Mechanics (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to classical mechanics. Topics include: space and time; straight-line kinematics; motion in a plane; forces and static equilibrium; Newton’s laws; particle dynamics, with force and conservation of momentum; angular motion and conservation of angular momentum; universal gravitation and planetary motion; collisions and conservation laws; work, potential energy and conservation of energy; vibrational motion; conservative forces; inertial forces and non-inertial frames; central force motions; rigid bodies and rotational dynamics. Instructor-led class time including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS101 OR CS101

 

ENGS122 Mechanics Lab (Credits: 1)

Hands-on laboratory course to accompany Mechanics. Students will conduct experiments in support of the topics covered in Mechanics.

Corequisite: ENGS121

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS123 Electricity and Magnetism (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to topics related to electricity and magnetism, including Coulomb’s law, electric and magnetic fields, capacitance, electrical current and resistance, electromagnetic induction, light, waves, quantum physics, solid state physics, and semiconductors. Instructor-led class time including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS101

 

ENGS124 Electricity and Magnetism Lab (Credits: 1)

Hands-on laboratory course to accompany Electricity and Magnetism. Students will conduct experiments in support of the topics covered in Electricity and Magnetism.

Corequisite: ENGS123

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS131 Chemistry (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to principles of chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, periodic properties, stoichiometry, nomenclature, bonding, physical properties of states of matter, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base reactions, metathesis reactions, redox reactions, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and chemical properties of selected classes of compounds. Instructor-led class time including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS132 Chemistry Lab (Credits: 1)

Hands-on laboratory course to accompany Chemistry. Students will conduct experiments in support of the topics covered in Chemistry.

Corequisite: ENGS131

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS135 Introduction to Chemical Engineering (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS141 Engineering Statics (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to fundamental engineering principles such as forces, moments, couples, resultants of force systems, equilibrium analysis and free-body diagrams, analysis of forces acting on members of trusses, frames, shear-force and bending-moment distributions, Coulomb friction, centroids and center of mass, and applications of statics in design.  Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS121

 

ENGS142 Engineering Dynamics (Credits: 3)

This course engages students in formulating and solving problems that involve forces that act on bodies which are moving.  Topics include kinematics of particles and rigid bodies, equations of motion, work-energy methods, and impulse and momentum, translating and rotating coordinate systems. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS141

 

ENGS151 Circuits (Credits: 3)

Introductory course in fundamental electrical circuit theory as well as analog and digital signal processing methods currently used to solve a variety of engineering design problems.  Circuit and system simulation analysis tools are introduced and emphasized. Topics include basic concepts of AC/DC and digital electrical circuits, power electronics, linear circuit simulation and analysis, op-amp circuits, transducers, feedback, circuit equivalents and system models, first order transients, the description of sinusoidal signals and system response, analog/digital conversion, basic digital logic gates and combinatorial circuits.  Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS123

 

ENGS152 Circuits Lab (Credits: 1)

Hands-on laboratory course to reinforce concepts covered as well as provide system-level understanding.  Students will conduct experiments in support of the topics covered in Circuits.

Corequisite: ENGS151

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS171 Biology (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS174 Biotechnology (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS176 Environmental Engineering (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS181 Introduction to Materials Science (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS211 Numerical Methods (Credits: 3)

This course covers fundamentals of numerical methods in engineering. Topics include floating-point computation, systems of linear equations, approximation of functions and integrals, and numerical analysis and solutions of ordinary differential equations.   Instructor-led class time including computational platforms, problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS103 AND ENGS115

 

ENGS241 Computer Aided Design (Credits: 3)

Fundamentals of part design; computer-aided design tools and data structures; geometric modeling; transformations; CAD/CAM data exchange; mechanical assembly. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS141

 

ENGS245 Thermodynamics (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS246 Heat Transfer (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS248 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS251 Embedded Systems (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the unique computing and design challenges posed by embedded systems.  Students will solve real-world design problems using small-scale and resource-constrained platforms.  Examples will be drawn from combined hardware and software systems and basic interactions between embedded computers and the physical world.   Emphasis is placed on interfacing embedded processors with common sensors and devices (e.g. temperature sensors, keypads, LCD display, SPI ports, pulse width modulated motor controller outputs) while developing the skills needed to use embedded processors in systems design. Instructor-led class time including problem sets as well as experimentation using hardware/software equipment. Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: CS130 AND ENGS151

 

ENGS252 Signals and Systems (Credits: 3)

This course develops further understanding of principles of electrical and mechanical systems.  Topics include representations of discrete-time and continuous-time signals such as Fourier representations, Laplace and Z transforms, sampling; representations of linear, time-invariant systems such as difference and differential equations, block diagrams, system functions, poles and zeros, as well as impulse and step responses and frequency responses.   Examples are drawn from engineering and physics, including the realms of feedback and control, communications, and signal processing.   Instructor-led class time including problem sets and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS142 AND ENGS151

 

ENGS261 Control Systems 1 (Credits: 3)

This course synthesizes fundamental electrical and mechanical principles in the analysis and design of control systems and control systems technology. Sensors, actuators, modeling of physical systems, design and implementation of feedback controllers; operational techniques used in describing, analyzing and designing linear continuous systems; Laplace transforms; response via transfer functions; stability; performance specifications; controller design via transfer functions; frequency response; simple nonlinearities. This course is intended to be taken concurrently with Control Systems 1 Lab.  Instructor-led class time including problem sets as well as experimentation in a variety of controls applications.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS252

 

ENGS262 Control Systems 1 Lab (Credits: 1)

Hands-on laboratory course to reinforce concepts covered as well as provide system-level understanding.  Students will conduct experiments in support of the topics covered in Control Systems 1.

Corequisite: ENGS261

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS263 Control Systems 2 (Credits: 3)

Building on Control Systems 1, this course engages students in more rigorous analysis in control theory.  Methods include time domain modeling, trajectories and phase plane analysis, similarity transforms, controllability and observability, pole placement and observers, linear quadratic optimal control, Lyapunov stability and describing functions and simulation.   This course is intended to be taken concurrently with Control Systems 2 Lab.  Instructor-led class time including problem sets as well as experimentation in a variety of controls applications.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: ENGS261

 

ENGS264 Control Systems 2 Lab (Credits: 1)

Hands-on laboratory course to reinforce concepts covered as well as provide system-level understanding.  Students will conduct experiments in support of the topics covered in Control Systems 2.

Corequisite: ENGS263

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS265 Mechatronics Design (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS275 Resource Management (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS276 Project Management (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS280 Alternative Energy (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

ENGS299 Capstone (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

 

IESM050 Intro to MATLAB (Credits: 3)

Three hours of lecture per week.  MATLAB (MATrix LABoratory) is a leading software used for numerical analysis. It provides an environment for computation and visualization. Students will work toward developing a working knowledge of MATLAB to implement and test algorithms, thus enabling a deeper understanding of and facility working with analytical engineering tools.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM106 Probability and Statistics (Credits: 3)

The topics covered in this introductory course include: axioms of probability; conditional probability, independence; combinatorial analysis; random variables and distributions; expectation, variance, covariance; transformation of random variables; limit theorems, the law of large numbers, the central limit theorem; Markov chains; applications; statistical estimation; correlation, regression; hypothesis testing, maximum likelihood estimation, Bayesian updating; applications. Students are required to complete problem sets in order to demonstrate rudimentary foundational knowledge in mathematical modeling and to apply practical analytical and numerical methods to solve problems in computational sciences.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM220 Operations Research 1 (Credits: 3)

Decision making with constrained resources, including product mix, scheduling, and manufacturing models, project planning, and planning with uncertain futures. The course also introduces analysis of network-based models such as vehicle routing, as well decision problems with opposition (game theory). This course concentrates on the classical linear programming (LP) model as a solution method, and introduces extensions of LP that accommodate logical decisions, in particular mixed-integer programming (MIP). Familiarity with basic linear algebra and a programming language is required.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: BUS109 OR ENGS101

 

IESM301 Analysis and Design of Data Systems (Credits: 3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Review of data systems and data processing functions; technology; organization and management; emphasizing industrial and commercial application requirements and economic performance criteria; survey of systems analysis, design; modeling and implementation; tools and techniques; design-oriented term project.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM311 Quality Assurance and Management (Credits: 3)

Three hours of lecture per week.  Principles and methods of statistical process control,  quality engineering,  total quality management, as applied to manufacturing and service industries.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM106

 

IESM313 Data Mining & Predictive Analytics (Credits: 3)

Exploratory Data Analysis; Classification: Decision Trees, Model Evaluation, Overfitting; Linear and Logistic Regression; Association Analysis; Cluster Analysis; Anomaly Detection; Model Building and Validation

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM315 Design and Analysis of Experiments (Credits: 3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Principles and methods of design and analysis of experiments in engineering and other fields,  realworld applications of experimental design,  completely randomized designs,  randomized blocks,  latin squares, analysis of variance (ANOVA),  factorial and fractional factorial designs,  regression modeling and nonparametric methods in analysis of variance.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM321 Operations Research 2 (Credits: 3)

Deterministic and stochastic models and methods in Operations Research,  network analysis,  integer programming,  unconstrained and constrained optimization,  deterministic and stochastic dynamic programming,  Markov chains,  queuing theory.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM220

 

IESM324 Applied Statistics for Engineers (Credits: 3)

This course starts by introducing the probability laws as a foundation for statistical inference in engineering. The concept of the likelihood function in an engineering model is illustrated. The course provides a substantial coverage of propagation of error, as well as an emphasis on model-fitting. The use of simulation methods and the bootstrap is made for verifying normality assumptions, estimating bias, computing confidence intervals, and testing hypotheses. In the second part of the course, diagnostic procedures are introduced for linear regression models including material on examination of residual plots, transformations of variables, and principles of variable selection in multivariate models. The analysis of data from a class of experiments is discussed along with statistical quality control. Instructor led lectures and discussion. Assessment by problem sets, exams, and projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM330 Simulation of Industrial Engineering Systems (Credits: 3)

Three hours of lecture per week.  Design, programming and statistical analysis issues in simulation study of industrial and operational systems,  generation of random variables with specified distributions,  variance reduction techniques,  statistical analysis of output data,  case studies,  term project.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM106

 

IESM331 Production Systems Analysis (Credits: 3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Analysis, design and management of production systems. Topics covered include productivity measurement; forecasting techniques; project planning; line balancing; inventory systems; aggregate planning; master scheduling; operations scheduling; facilities location; and modern approaches to production management such as Just-In-time production.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM106 AND IESM321

 

IESM340 Engineering Economics (Credits: 3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Analysis of economic investment alternatives,  concepts of the time value of money and minimum attractive rate of return,  cash flow analysis using various accepted criteria, e.g., present worth, future worth, internal rate of return, external rate of return,  depreciation and taxes,  decision making under uncertainty,  benefitcost analysis,  effects of inflation (relative price changes).

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM345 Supply Chain Management (Credits: 3)

This course focuses upon the strategic importance of supply chain management. The purpose of the course is to design and manage business-to-business to retail supply chain purchasing and distribution systems, and to formulate an integrated supply chain strategy that is supportive of various corporate strategies. New purchasing and distribution opportunities for businesses and inter/intra company communications systems designed for creating a more efficient marketplace are explored.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM346 Managing Engineering and Technology (Credits: 3)

Managing Engineering and Technology is designed for engineers, scientists, and other technologists interested in enhancing their management skills, and for managers in enhancing their skills and knowledge about engineering and science. Specifically, the course is tailored to the needs of technical professionals and will cover: the historical development of management with an emphasis on the management of technology, management methods and tools, transition from technical performer to technical management, and the nature and application of management principles throughout the technology product/project life cycles.BREAKThe course will be based on a mix of theory, empirical evidence and real-life cases. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM347 Design and Innovation of Information Services (Credits: 3)

The course aims to provide with theoretical and practical insight into the key concepts and issues that guide the design and development of modern information services. The students will explore the contextual considerations of designing information services through in-depth examination of expanding possibilities for innovation and associated risks that modern-day devices, data, content, systems and infrastructures offer. Of particular interest will be the structuring and design of problems in industries with complex ecosystems using Soft Systems Methodology and Unified Modeling Language with special stress on capturing and analyzing information requirements of parties involved.BREAKBREAKNo prerequisite knowledge is required.  As part of the course, students will design their own information service to address a problem of their choice, using all the depth of technical and social issues facing companies, individual users and societies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM349 Enabling Competitive Advantage through Information Technology (Credits: 3)

This class is intended to introduce students to the critical role of information technologies (IT) in enabling competitive strategies.  Our particular focus will be the impact that IT can have on non-IT companies, from industries such as transportation, supermarkets, financial institutions, and healthcare.  This is not a “how-to” guide on managing enterprise information systems.  Rather, the focus is on the word Enable, and we will explore how different companies have used IT to develop significant competitive advantage in the marketplace.  The course will consist of case readings and discussions, short assignments, group project, and mid-term and final exams.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM350 Alternative Energy (Credits: 3)

The course reviews: the basics of the alternative energy generation options,  the respective technologies and resources,  as well as the economic, environmental and urban aspects of their introduction into the modern society. Topics include: the role and the current status of the alternative energy in the modern society,  energy and force – phenomena and units,  solar radiation characteristics,  carbon cycle and traditional sources of energy,  solar thermal processes (options), such as wind, solar heat, ocean heat and wave, solar hot water, solar electricity, passive solar,  solar photon processes, such as solar photovoltaics – from principles to systems, biomass, biofuel, biogas, etc,  nuclear power – fusion and fission,  infrastructure related economics,  distributed power,  energy storage, etc.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM351 Sustainable Smart and Resource Efficient Systems 1: Systems and Technologies (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to the latest practices and technologies in reducing the environmental impact of buildings and the built environment with specific focus on energy, water, and waste. Students will be expected to gain analytical and quantitative skills in analyzing energy, transport, water, and solid waste with the aim of estimating ways to achieve “carbon neutrality,” “zero emissions,”  among other green goals. Students will also be introduced to green built environment norms established by the US Green Building Council as well as other international companies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM352 Sustainable Smart and Resource Efficient Systems 2: Decision Making Tools (Credits: 3)

The course will focus on non‐design decision tools. The analytical tools to be covered will include financial (payback period, NPV, and IRR), economic (Input‐Output, Cost‐Benefit), and environmental (Life Cycle Assessment, McKinsey Carbon Abatement Analysis, Carbon Footprint, Water Footprint, Ecological Footprint). Many of these analyses will be relevant for a wide range of industries including transportation, construction, manufacturing, as well as energy. The course will use cases and simulations to teach and deepen understanding of core concepts and methodologies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM360 Computer-Aided Design (Credits: 3)

Fundamentals of part design; computer-aided design tools and data structures; geometric modeling; transformations; CAD/CAM data exchange; mechanical assembly.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM361 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (Credits: 3)

Introduction to manufacturing processes; cutting fundamentals; design for manufacturability; design for machining; process engineering; NC fundamentals; manual NC programming; computer-aided part programming; group technology.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM362 Advanced CAD/CAM Applications (Credits: 3)

Advanced surface and solid modeling,  top down and bottom up assembly,  finite element analysis,  sensitivity studies,  optimization,  advanced computeraided part programming and manufacturing,  mold design,  team work.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM372 Portfolio Theory and Risk Management (Credits: 3)

Students in this course will become familiar with the basic concepts of interest theory, portfolio theory and risk assessment and be able to apply these in problem solving, with an emphasis on mathematical and computational approaches. The student will also become acquainted with various financial risk management instruments and use different criteria to optimize portfolios, taking into consideration the strengths and weaknesses of different portfolio selection criteria. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, software implementation, exams, and projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM220 OR CS213 AND CS108 OR IESM106

 

IESM390 Integrative Project in Modern Production Methods (Credits: 3)

Two hours of lecture and discussion and six hours of field work per week. This is a projectbased course that involves field work (in manufacturing or service organizations) and integrates and synthesizes knowledge gained from several courses (e.g., operations management, operations research, statistics, and quality management). Student teams, supported by several faculty members, will work with industrial companies to identify improvement opportunities and help in implementing them.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM391 Independent Study (Credits: 3)

Special study of a particular problem under the direction of a faculty member. The student must present a written, detailed report of the work accomplished.  Approval of the IESM Program Chair and the instructor is required.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM395 Capstone Preparation (Credits: 2)

Review of Capstone objectives and procedure; faculty and industry representatives’ presentation of suggested research topics; field trips to the local companies; literature survey and classroom presentation by students. Students select the topic of their capstone project and the supervisor and prepare and submit the project proposal. Students draft a literature survey on their selected topic, which will constitute a section or chapter of the capstone project report. The completed and approved Proposal for Culminating Experience Requirement form must be filed in the College office prior to the end of the course.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

IESM396 Capstone: Thesis (Credits: 4)

One of the two Capstone options offered by the Program. Supervised individual study employing concepts and methods learned in the program to solve a problem of significant importance from a practical or theoretical standpoint. This option is more appropriate for those students who are interested in an in-depth R&D experience.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM395

 

IESM397 Capstone: Project (Credits: 1)

One of the two Capstone options offered by the Program. Supervised individual study employing concepts and methods learned in the program to solve a problem from a practical standpoint. This option is more appropriate for those students who are inclined to practical work and do not necessarily aspire for intensive research training.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: IESM395

 

 

Gerald and Patricia Turpanjian School of Public Health

 

 

PH101 Basics of Healthy Lifestyle (Credits: 3)

The course provides an overview of concepts and issues related to mental, social, and physical dimensions of health with a focus on healthy behaviors and lifestyle. The course emphasizes preventive health practices which reduce risk factors associated with disease. The course enables students to analyze the relationship between healthy lifestyle and health and builds knowledge and skills to recognize and cope with health problems that they may face during their college years and later in life. Main topics include behavior change, mental health, stress and stress management, nutrition, addictions, physical exercise, and sexual behavior and STIs.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

PH201 Global Health (Credits: 3)

This multidisciplinary course is designed to explore global health and how it impacts all of us globally and locally. The course develops skillsets for interpreting, developing and using global health indicators and methods, and to explore the application of measures to improve the wellbeing of people globally and locally.   The course will include an exploration of topics including leading causes of death, disease and disability, mental health, socioeconomic impacts on health, maternal and child health, media and health, disasters and war (including earthquakes and genocide), climatic change, gender equity and humanitarianism.  The course will confer theory and practice for developing and measuring indicators of health and wellbeing.  Students will be graded based on quizzes and exams, group projects with reallife problems, oral presentations and participation.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

PH202 Causes, Treatment and Prevention of Cancer (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of the biological basis of cancer, including the causes and progression of cancer, as well as the currently available treatment options. The course addresses the genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors’ contribution to cancer with the emphasis on changes occurring on molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Specific attention is paid to factors, including behavioral, social and environmental, important for prevention of cancer. This course also examines how the concept of cancer and understanding of its causes evolved throughout history based on important discoveries in the biomedical field.  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to apply the knowledge of cancer biology in adopting appropriate lifestyle strategies.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

PH302 General Principles of Public Health Problem Solving (Credits: 3)

An introduction to the diverse profession of public health and a guiding paradigm for public health problems solving, this course emphasizes the development of essential skills in critical thinking and group process.  Student groups will complete an analysis of a current public health problem, including recommended courses of action.  Evaluation components consist of individual and group participation, an individual written critique and other written assignments, a group paper, and a group presentation.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

PH303 Special Studies Seminar (Credits: 3)

Seminar series offered by MPH faculty for MPH students.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

PH304 MPH Elective (Credits: 1)

Special seminar topics offered by guest faculty for MPH students.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

PH310 Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health (Credits: 3)

This course utilizes the PRECEDEPROCEED framework for analyzing the behavioral and sociocultural determinants of public health problems and the role of the individual, family, and community in addressing public health problems. Evaluation is based upon class participation, an examination, and a project carried out in the community or the AUA Health Center.

Corequisite:

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PH311 Problem Investigation in Environmental Health (Credits: 3)

This course presents the broad concepts and principles used in organizing and assessing the major environmental health problems in low/middle income and in industrialized countries. Student evaluation is based on quizzes, examinations, and a project.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

PH320 Data Management Systems (Credits: 1)

Students will apply their knowledge of database, spreadsheet and statistical packages to the development of appropriate database and management information systems to process and analyze raw data.  Issues of database design, coding schemes, data cleaning, and handling missing data will be addressed.  Evaluation is based upon graded problem sets.

Corequisite:

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PH321 Inferential Biostatistics (Credits: 5)

This course introduces the major concepts of modern statistics as applied to problems in public health and medicine.  The topics begin with an understanding of life tables and survival curves, progress to concepts of probability and distributions, and conclude with inferential reasoning and simple regression.  Evaluation is based on problem sets, quizzes, and examinations.

Corequisite:

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PH322 Epidemiology (Credits: 3)

This course introduces the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation of infectious and non-infectious diseases.  Epidemiologic reasoning and assessment is demonstrated through faculty lectures and problem solving exercises.  Evaluation is based upon a mid-term and final examination..

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PH323 Biostatistics: Modeling and Sampling (Credits: 4)

This course advances the concepts of linear regression to a unified perspective of generalized linear models, including multivariate regression, logistics regression, and log-linear models.  Established and recently collected data sets will be analyzed using these methods.  The course also addresses issues of sampling, sample size, and power calculations with respect to a number of study designs. Evaluation is based on problem sets, quizzes, and examinations.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: PH321

 

PH324 Intermediate Epidemiology (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon the introductory course in epidemiology as well as courses in survey design and sampling.  Students learn to assess the impact of bias and confounding and techniques for mitigating those effects. Special consideration will be given to the role of case-control studies in addressing a variety of health and organizational problems.  Evaluation is based upon examinations and practical exercises.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: PH322

 

PH330 Health Economics and Finance (Credits: 4)

This course consists of two components. The first component addresses the basics of health sector financial management, including simple budgeting, variance analysis, and benefit/cost analysis as tools for assessing the financial health of an organization.  The second component of the course explores the application of basic micro and macro economic principles to the health sector.  Evaluation is based upon homework assignments, quizzes, projects and exams.

Corequisite:

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PH331 Comparative Health Systems (Credits: 2)

This course provides an overview of the conceptual aspects of the macro level organization of health care systems worldwide.  The course presents the economic and financing mechanisms underlying changes occurring in the health sector.  It also provides a critical comparison of the philosophy, organization, financing, and benefit packages of different health care systems; comparing low, medium, and high-income countries.  Evaluation is based upon a quiz, a group project, and a take-home examination.

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PH332 Program Planning (Credits: 3)

This course addresses the analytic and practical considerations in designing and implementing a field program.  Topics addressed include manpower and facilities planning, design, and implementation considerations, and planning for evaluation.  Evaluation is based upon a student project.

Corequisite:

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PH340 Health Services Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides the practical and theoretical underpinnings of the organization and management of health organizations.  Specific emphasis is placed on individual leadership and management skill development.  Evaluation is based upon examinations and student projects.

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PH350 Project Development and Evaluation (Credits: 4)

This course provides a thorough grounding in the basic methods of health services evaluation, focusing on research designs, threats to reliability and validity, and instrumentation.  Emphasis is on critical analysis and assessment of study designs.  Evaluation is based upon an examination, student-prepared evaluation protocols, and critiques of published papers.

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PH351 Qualitative Research Methods (Credits: 3)

This course introduces the methods and techniques used in conducting qualitative research.  Course sessions will focus on the development of practical research skills relevant to the collection, management and analysis of qualitative data useful for the design, implementation and evaluation of public health programs.  Methods for data collection will include individual in-depth interviews, individual and group/social observations, and focus group discussions. Note: The formative research projects will form the basis for development of a formalized survey instrument during PH352.

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PH352 Survey Research Methods (Credits: 3)

This course demonstrates the application of health survey research methods in the field.  Topics include the design, implementation, and evaluation of a health survey instrument, including probability sampling, questionnaire design, interview techniques, coding procedures, and planning for the analysis and presentation of the findings.  Evaluation is based upon an examination, participation in field projects, a written report, and a presentation.  Note: The data generated during this exercise will be analyzed as part of PH323.

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PH360 Training of Trainers (Credits: 3)

This course prepares MPH graduates to effectively respond to the enhanced job responsibility of providing formal and informal in-service training to professional colleagues and co-workers.  The course will prepare students to develop objective-based learning modules and to develop and refine effective presentation and teaching skills.  Evaluation is based upon short quizzes, presentations, and the development and delivery of a brief instructional module relevant to the student’s professional objectives.

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PH381 Graduate Research Seminar (Credits: 3)

This course begins a structured emphasis on application of core knowledge and critical thinking skills.  Students will critically review and discuss a number of relevant journal articles with an orientation toward the application of these insights to the health context of Armenia and the region. Students will also critically review on-going student projects.(Pass/ Fail only).

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PH390 MPH Project Planning (Credits: 1)

This course allows students to formulate a preliminary project proposal for their MPH Project.  Students will apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the first year curriculum to shape and focus a tentative project proposal and implementation plan.  Evaluation is based upon successful completion of a draft proposal.

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PH391 Master’s Project Implementation I (Credits: 3)

Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, students will concentrate on implementing and completing the Masters Project defined during course PH 390.

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PH392 Master’s Project Implementation II (Credits: 4)

Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, students complete a master’s project, concluding with a paper of publishable quality and oral presentation to faculty and relevant members of the public health practice community.

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PH393 MPH Internship (Credits: 3)

The goal of the MPH internship is to have a public health experience that provides an opportunity to contact with public health professionals and participate in real-life projects in a meaningful way. The internship will provide a significant practical experience in population-based health prior to graduation. (Pass/Fail only)

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Acopian Center for the Environment (ACE)

 

ENV101 Introduction to Environmental Sciences (Credits: 3)

The course aims to introduce students to basic environmental science principles, including the structure and functioning of ecosystems and their physical and bio-chemical cycles. The course will emphasize the importance of these processes for human health as well as human impact on these processes. As a science course, the course will teach students to use the methods of scientific inquiry to raise questions about global systems, their impact on humans, and human impact on them. Specific topics to be covered include but are not limited to biodiversity, quantity and quality of water, land and air resources, environmental conservation, human population trends and dynamic, food and industrial production, and waste and toxicity. Topics will be supplemented by Armenia and Caucasus-specific cases and problem sets. Students are required to attend three field trips over the weekend. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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ENV105 Numbers, Responsibility  and the Environment (Credits: 3)

The course is a practical introduction to basic quantitative and statistical techniques that can be applied to environmental studies. Students will learn techniques to identify, organize, verify, and understand data, including analyzing trends and tendencies. The course will emphasize the importance of ethical and responsible use of data and information. Each topic will begin with an introduction to a numerical or statistical concept followed by the application of that concept on a real world environmental challenge or opportunity. Students will use basic data analysis tools such as Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets.

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ENV120 Food (Credits: 3)

This course provides a fundamental knowledge on food, its economics and environmental sustainability focusing on food values chains, production, and domestic and international marketing. This entails description of primary agricultural resources and inputs (including key environmental concerns related with these inputs), production technologies, post-harvest handling, logistics, marketing and state regulations and interventions. The course will also discuss government policies on food security, safety, trade, and environmental resilience and sustainability. Students will also learn developments in food industry such as genetically modified food, organic agriculture, fair trade, and reduction of food loss. Students will have to participate in one field visit to a food-production facility, which will most likely be organized on a weekend.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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ENV140 Solid and Hazardous Waste (Credits: 3)

The course is designed for undergraduate students to understand the fundamental principles and key technologies of solid and hazardous waste management. It encompasses environmental and health effects of solid and hazardous wastes as well as the legal and regulatory framework that relates to waste management. The course will cover various waste streams (household, commercial, industrial, medical, etc.) and central principles of their management, including collection, handling, sorting, transportation, reprocessing/recycling, and disposal. The course will also discuss waste minimization strategies, zero-waste approaches, reuse and recycle technologies, and waste-to-energy solutions. As a science-based, quantitative course, the lectures and discussions will be supplemented with learning activities, such as visits to waste disposal sites, scientific investigations, and numerical problem solving. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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ENV150 Basics of Sustainable Energy (Credits: 3)

The course focuses on sustainable generation and use of energy. Topics will include identifying, evaluating and managing sustainable energy use and generation in homes, buildings, industry, cities, and nationally. Specific topics shall include energy efficiency, lighting, centralized renewable energy generation, distributed renewable energy generation, smart grids, e-transportation, energy storage, as well as sustainable energy policies. Students will have an understanding of sustainable energy from the environmental, economic, and social perspectives. Students will be evaluated based on individual or group projects and written examinations. Instructor-led class time.  Not available to BS ES students.

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ENV170 Chemistry in Everyday Life (Credits: 3)

The course highlights and discusses the practical chemical world of human beings and the chemical nature of everyday processes. The role of chemistry in necessities of daily life such as the chemistry of life, agriculture, food, housing, healthcare, clothing, household goods (e.g., toys, furniture, etc.), transport and communications will be discussed. In addition the course will introduce various applications of chemistry in the area of arts, crime and law enforcement, consumer products, cosmetics and warfare. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including experimental design and chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and presentation of the final results. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

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ENV202 Projects in Environmental Sciences (Credits: 3)

This upper division course is designed for undergraduate students to gain a deeper understanding and competence in environmental project design, implementation, and evaluation. The projects can be in technology, science, conservation, management, restoration, promotion/marketing, education, and other related topics. The course, however, emphasizes data collection and analysis for assessing the success and impact of project ideas. The students will design and complete a project for the course. The types of environmental projects will vary depending on student and faculty agreement. The projects may be related to the following broad topics: Clean technologies; IT, satellite, remote sensing solutions in environmental protection; alternative transport, clean transport; renewable-energy generation or energy efficiency; sustainable water use, solid waste management, sustainable agriculture and food production; mining pollution prevention/ management; forest protection/management/restoration; watershed  rotection/management/restoration; air-quality protection/management/restoration; and flora or fauna monitoring/conservation/restoration.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

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ENV203 Environmental Monitoring (Credits: 3)

The course is to present general procedures, methods, theories and techniques in the monitoring programs for different environments. Environmental contamination in air, water and wastewater, soils, and food will be discussed with the emphasis on instrument selection and quality control, including documentation, calibration, and sample management. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including planning and designing monitoring, biological and physical-chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and effective presentation of the final results. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

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ENV204 Environmental Decision Tools (Credits: 3)

When a project (e.g., a hydro-power plant, a highway, or a mine) is built or a program/policy (e.g., promoting agriculture, regulating car emissions, or increasing waste disposal fees) is adopted, it could impact the natural environment (air, water, soil, flora, fauna, and ecosystems) and the human environment (resettlement of populations, noise, dust, odors, vibrations, obstruction of views, etc.). How do we understand these impacts and inform project design and policy formulation to minimize, mitigate, or eliminate negative impacts? This course will discuss the tools available and commonly used to do this: Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Cumulative Impact Assessment (CIA), Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), and economic cost-benefit analysis (CBA). The course will also highlight the role of ecosystem services valuation as a relatively new concept that can enhance the effectiveness of decision-making tools introduced in the course. Instructor-led discussions and written assignments.

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ENV210 Disasters (Credits: 3)

This course explores the history, fundamentals, principles, theories, and approaches to disaster management.  Students study natural and manmade disasters and the planning and management tools available for preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation.  Topical investigations include: an overview of disaster management, the range of physical and human impacts, the role of decision-makers and the general public, and structural and non-structural techniques in this quantitative science course.  Armenia- specific cases and scenarios are also considered and discussed.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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ENV211 Sustainable Cities (Credits: 3)

The course will introduce the concept of sustainable cities—places where there is human prosperity, social equity, and environmental health. Special emphasis will be placed on the concepts and tools necessary to address the environmental sustainability of cities. The concepts and tools covered includes: a) urban metabolism (material and energy flows); b) urban ecology; c) disaster resilience; d) smart cities and data analytics; and e) role of integrated and inclusive urban planning and governance. Students are expected to collect, analyze and present data as well as assess the merits of analyses by others. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

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ENV212 Mining (Credits: 3)

The course introduces the basic concepts of mineral exploration, ore extraction, mineral processing, and mine-waste management. The course will have a particular focus on related environmental, occupational safety, public health and social management issues and approaches. As a quantitative science course, emphasis will be placed on statistical, scientific, and engineering tools for understanding better management of mining operations. Additionally, the course will introduce some of the legal and policy topics related to good governance of the mining sector in a country. Both international and Armenia- specific cases will be used to highlight concepts and effective practices. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments. When administered in the summer, this course may be taught in intensive format with a fieldwork component. Intensive could include meeting daily in a field location.

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ENV215 Urban Environment Mapping: Field Application of Sensing and Visualization Tools (Credits: 3)

The course is on spatio-temporal mapping of urban environments, with particular emphasis on field application of sensor and visualization technologies. The course will introduce the theoretical and technical framework of urban environmental data acquisition and visualization using readily available sensing kits and the state-of- the-art mapping platforms. The course promotes active student participation. Students will become familiar and apply the following software tools: ArcGIS or QGIS (open-source), Rhino3D, Grasshopper3D, Arduino Program, and Grasshopper plug-in for Arduino I/O. The course will culminate in composition and presentation of a 5-minute videos that will document the students’ works. These video documentations will be publicly exhibited.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

 

ENV230 Water (Credits: 3)

Without adequate supply of freshwater our economies will not function and our health will not be secured. Human overuse and pollution of freshwater can also cause political conflict as well as damage ecosystems. This course will examine water from various perspectives including ecological, human health, resource stewardship, economic, and legal/political. Specific topics to be covered include water supply and use in manufacturing, mining, energy, agriculture and domestic life; potential for resource efficiency and optimization; water quality and types of water pollution, methods of testing and monitoring water quality and conditions of freshwater ecosystems; water purification and wastewater treatment; water planning and management tools/models including those for watersheds, surface, and ground waterresources; new technologies, such as desalination, to access freshwater; and international and national laws on water. The course includes field and lab work opportunities as well as introductory approaches to modeling water systems.

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ENV250 Biodiversity: Conservation and Restoration (Credits: 3)

This course is designed for undergraduate students to develop basic quantitative skills for deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of the current worldwide loss of plant, animal and other species. The course will cover the theory and practice of managing endangered species and the conservation and restoration of habitats and species populations. The course will emphasize how to apply science and the scientific method in the conservation and restoration of biodiversity. Worldwide as well as Armenia-specific cases will reviewed. A key expected outcome of the course is students’ competence in measuring trends using statistics and computing useful measures and indices. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

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ENV251 Forests (Credits: 3)

Students will use statistical and scientific tools to gain a deeper understanding of forests, forest-related processes, and management of this critical resource. The course will offer an introduction to the types of forests worldwide, the role of forests in ecosystem that protect the living environment, and their significance to human economies and well-being. Students will gain insights in the ecosystem services that forests provide—for instance, their importance in climate and water-cycle regulation as well as biodiversity and soil protection. Forest management techniques and the role of good forest governance will be highlighted throughout the course. Topics will be supplemented by Armenia and Caucasus-specific cases and problem sets. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments. When administered in the summer, this course may be taught in intensive format with a fieldwork component. Intensive could include meeting daily in a field location.

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ENV300 Natural Environment and Humans (Credits: 1)

The course is designed for graduate students from disparate disciplines to gain an overview of environmental principals and current environmental issues. The course will cover four broad areas. First it will discuss what ecosystems are, how they function, and the main processes keeping them stable. Second, it will review key environmental issues including climate change, loss of biodiversity, nitrogen and phosphorous cycle disruptions, eutrophication, chemical pollution (including persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, particulate, etc.), degradation of natural habitats (deforestation, grasslands change and wetlands drainage), and so on. Third, basic environmental concepts, frameworks, and tools will be presented including sustainability, planetary boundary, ecological footprint, carbon footprint, and TRACI. Finally, the course will present broad review of regulatory and market-based policy directions employed to address environmental change. Topics will be supplemented by Armenia and Caucasus-specific cases.

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ENV320 Geographic Information Systems and Environmental Analysis (Credits: 2)

The course aims to introduce and develop introductory and intermediate skills in application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to visualize, analyze, and interpret relationships, patterns and trends in the fields of environmental management, public health, sustainable agriculture and transportation. GIS as a tool, however, is applicable to a wide variety of fields and industries, including marketing, logistics, urban development, and so on.  Students will also learn to use Global Positioning System (GPS) units to collect spatial data.

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ENV321 Remote Sensing and Environmental Analysis (Credits: 1)

The course aims to provide a basic understanding of land-use mapping with remote-sensing techniques.The focus will be on multispectral remote sensing and pixel based image classification. For land use mapping, freely available satellite data from the Landsat mission will be used. Processing will be done with ArcMap10 or similar software.

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Prerequisite: ENV320

 

ENV325 Urban Environment Mapping: Field Application of Sensing and Visualization Tools (Credits: 3)

The course is on spatio-temporal mapping of urban environments, with particular emphasis on field application of sensor and visualization technologies. The course will introduce the theoretical and technical framework of urban environmental data acquisition and visualization using readily available sensing kits and the state-of- the-art mapping platforms. The course promotes active student participation. Students will become familiar and apply the following software tools: ArcGIS or QGIS (open-source), Rhino3D, Grasshopper3D, Arduino Program, and Grasshopper plug-in for Arduino I/O. The course will culminate in composition and presentation of a 5-minute videos that will document the students’ works. These video documentations will be publicly exhibited. Instructor-led classes and fieldwork.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission

 

ENV330 Business and Environmental Sustainability (Credits: 1)

The course is for graduate students with interest in business, management, and economics. It offers an overview of environmental challenges facing the planet today including climate change, loss of biodiversity, natural resource depletion, chemical pollution, and more. The course discusses corporate responses, political activist and governmental pressures on corporations, regulatory and market-based policy solutions, and technological innovations that are helping address these environmental challenges. Topics are supplemented by Armenia and Caucasus-specific cases.

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ENV399 Special Topics (Credits: 1)

Course Description tailored to course content when offered.

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Entrepreneurship and Product Innovation Center (EPIC)

 

 

EPIC231 Translations: Digital Fabrication in Design (Credits: 3)

The course aims to partake in the ongoing discourse about the role of fabrication for the production of design and manufacture.  More specifically it aspires to draw a connection between the advancement of design ideas and the use of techniques specific to the digital fabrication pipeline, and to posit how this coupling may further inform other areas of disciplinary research. As such, the course aims to be a research laboratory for the analysis, development and localized deployment of strategies for digital fabrication. BREAKTopics of study include:  design/fabrication typologies, technical performance, sustainable strategies, prefabrication methodology, current and future developments in design/fabrication, among others.

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EPIC331 Translations: Digital Fabrication in Design (Credits: 3)

The course aims to partake in the ongoing discourse about the role of fabrication for the production of design and manufacture.  More specifically it aspires to draw a connection between the advancement of design ideas and the use of techniques specific to the digital fabrication pipeline, and to posit how this coupling may further inform other areas of disciplinary research. As such, the course aims to be a research laboratory for the analysis, development and localized deployment of strategies for digital fabrication. BREAKTopics of study include:  design/fabrication typologies, technical performance, sustainable strategies, prefabrication methodology, current and future developments in design/fabrication, among others.

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Graduate Continuing Education

 

GCE600 Graduate Continuing Enrollment (Credits: 1)

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