General Education Courses

 

 

Introduction to Personal Finance (CBE102)

Credits:3

This course provides a framework for understanding the basics of financial literacy. Emphasis is placed on students becoming familiar with key components of the Armenian financial system as they relate to personal financial health. Topics to be addressed are an understanding of money origination and its turnover, basics of investing, insurance, banking products such as loans and savings accounts, credit and debit cards, current accounts, and others. The course will also study the major principles of different types of interest calculations and, finally, the importance of having and maintaining a good credit score. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week._x000D_ BAB cannot take as Gen Ed but can be used as a free elective.

 

Eastern Armenian Language 1 (CHSS101)

Credits:3

In this course students will learn the fundamentals of Eastern Armenian in order to be able to form simple sentences, recognize the Armenian alphabet and hold basic conversations. The course is for non-native speakers only.

 

Eastern Armenian Language 2 (CHSS102)

Credits:3

This is an intermediate level Eastern Armenian course for students with basic knowledge of the language. Students must be able to read and write Armenian, and have basic conversational skills. The course is designed to enhance reading, speaking, and writing skills through the use of literary texts, through the application of syntax rules, through lectures, class discussions, group work, video-audio presentations, visits by various scholars, writers and artists, and occasional visits to galleries and museums. Students will be introduced to the evolution of the Armenian language, to classical and modern Armenian (similarities/differences), and to Western and Eastern Armenian (similarities/differences). They will also become familiarized with the classical orthography through some original texts. The selected texts will be provided in the form of a Course Reader designed for intermediate level learning and through additional texts handed out by the instructor throughout the course. The reader will contain poems, short stories, fables and short essays. The students will be assigned to read and to analyze the texts both in oral and written forms.

 

Contemporary Issues in American Education (CHSS108)

Credits:3

This course engages students in explorations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues pertaining to American education. More specifically, students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of public educational settings in the United States. Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the domains of the American public-school system. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a pluralistic society and examine the ethical responsibilities of teaching in a political democracy. When appropriate, students will be asked to engage in comparative considerations of meanings and functions of public education in the United States and Republic of Armenia. Lecture, in-class workshops and group discussions.

 

Introduction to Philosophy (CHSS110)

Credits:3

This course aims at introducing students to some fundamental problems from various branches of philosophy: ontology, epistemology and ethics. Questions regarding the existence of matter, God, causation, free will and other minds, the possibility of knowledge, as well as some ethical questions will be addressed during the course. Students will read carefully selected writings from classical and modern philosophers. Students will be asked to write short essays and participate in well-structured debates and discussions. This course will help students develop critical and creative thinking skills, the ability to deal with uncertainty, conceptualize and theoretically analyze real life situations and problems. Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Introduction to Ethics (CHSS111)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to major ethical theories: virtue ethics, deontology and utilitarianism. Students will use these frameworks to analyze ethical issues and develop their own positions to perennial problems. Special emphasis is placed on linking philosophical discussions to topics relevant to students as learners, workers, and citizens which may include numerous aspects of personal, social, professional and political life. Students will read carefully selected readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Through rigorous inclass debates and discussions, students will be challenged to consider ethical dilemmas from different perspectives and weigh the strengths and shortcomings of various ethical theories. Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Logic & Rhetoric (CHSS112)

Credits:3

The course introduces basic laws of logic, forms of thought, strategies and devices of developing and presenting public speeches. The course concentrates on two main questions: 1) How to reason well? 2) How to make a convincing speech or write a convincing essay? Students are expected to read selected texts on logic and rhetoric, prepare and perform oral speeches and write essays using various strategies, logical and rhetorical techniques of argumentation. Speeches and essays will be on various topics, for various audiences. During the course students will also scrutinize, analyze and assess historical as well as contemporary speeches from public and political life. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Introduction to Religion (CHSS114)

Credits:3

The course examines religion as a phenomenon of human culture. It firstly introduces the students to the main theoretical approaches and methods through which religion has been studied by historians and social scientists. Secondly, the course looks at the major themes in the study of religion. These themes will be examined drawing on particular religious traditions and through the lens of the theoretical approaches covered. Readings will include theoretical writings about religion by classics and contemporary authors, and primary texts from various religious traditions and by representatives of those traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Its broader aim is to give the students an understanding of the richness of the religious traditions of the world, and to develop skills to analyze religious phenomena and to situate them in their historical contexts. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

History of the Middle East (CHSS125)

Credits:3

A critical survey of the history of the Middle East from the period of Hellenism (323 BCE) to the present. The course especially focuses on the interplay of powerful political, cultural, economic and ideological forces that brought to life the formation and rise of Christianity and Islam, the millennial conflict between the Islamic and European imperialisms, interactions between the Roman-Byzantine, Iranian, Arab, and Turkic ethno-cultural worlds and political systems, westernization and transformations of the Middle East in the course of the First and Second World Wars, and the current regional sociopolitical and economic dynamics. Special attention is paid to the place of Armenia and Armenians in Middle Eastern history. This is a lecture course enhanced by students’ analysis of readings concerning main and supplementary topics. Evaluation is based on letter grading of students’ individual oral presentations, research essays, quizzes, and participation in group projects.

 

World Civilizations I (CHSS127)

Credits:3

The course explores the meaning and importance of interdisciplinary study of world history by introducing students to distinctive features and characteristics of civilizations that had developed in the Old and New worlds from the earliest times to 1700 CE. It will emphasize the importance of primary sources and of critical analysis of academic theories. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

History of the Modern World (CHSS128)

Credits:3

A critical introductory survey of the history of the Modern World from the beginning of the Age of Great Geographic Discoveries in the 15th century to the present. The course explores especially the foundations and transformations of modern imperialism, globalization, nation state, industrializations, forms of sociopolitical and economic organization, financial capitalism, international and domestic competition and conflict, the current technological civilization and humanism, the individual and the collective from a general perspective of history of civilizations. This is a lecture course enhanced by students’ analysis of readings concerning main and supplementary topics. Evaluation is based on letter grading of students’ individual oral presentations, research essays, quizzes, and participation to group projects.

 

Global Perspectives and Site Stories (CHSS129)

Credits:3

This course takes a close look at the historical, cultural, political, global, and economic factors surrounding Armenia’s reemergence as an independent state in the late 20th century and its trajectory in the 21st century. Students will become acquainted with the main events and factors shaping contemporary Armenia and analyze different interpretations of the recent and more distant past as a frame for thinking about current events and longer term scenarios for the Armenian state and nation, placing an emphasis on global and regional issues. The course will be instructor-led, supplemented by group discussion, and may include visits to cultural or historic sites as well as individual or group projects.

 

Introduction to Art (CHSS130)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the elements of art: texture, form, shape, color, line and tone/style, proportion, perspective (and for film and mobiles, time/rhythm) as aspects of an artifact, art as it is produced, and art as it is perceived. It is also a survey in both geographic and time dimensions of art as an expression of human creativity, focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and film, while making relevant connections to other aspects of culture: music, dance, ritual, literature, religion, technology, politics, commerce (advertising), and design. This course will introduce students to the language of art, increasing recognition and understanding of references in popular culture, on clothing, and in film and other media. Visits to museums and excursions will be included in the learning activities. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

 

Acting Techniques (CHSS135)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the process of building a character and interacting on stage using movement, voice, and imagination. Throughout the course, students will explore techniques of improvisation and scene study, and develop the basic skills of the acting process. They will become familiar with the history and theory of the craft of acting, and apply relevant concepts and practices to critically analyze their own work and that of others. Coursework will include reading assignments, written critiques and reflections, and performance-based projects.

 

Music Appreciation (CHSS140)

Credits:3

This course aims to equip students to listen to, understand and discuss music as a cultural and aesthetic form of human creativity through acquaintance with Western European classical music from various periods. In this course students will learn to identify the basic elements of music, instruments, voice, genres, and styles, and will learn terminology used to discuss pieces of music as an art form and historical creation of a particular composer and period. The basic underpinnings of music in physics, psychology and brain science will also be introduced. The course requires extensive listening to music in and out of class, class discussion, and short papers on various composers and compositions. The course may also include mandatory attendance at concerts and a short research paper or class presentation on a work or composer of the students’ choice as an individual or group project.

 

Understanding the Twentieth Century through Music (CHSS141)

Credits:3

This course is designed to give students insight into the various cultural, political, economic, social and artistic developments of the twentieth century through the study of different types of music written between 1901 and 2000. Music is an indicator and/or trigger of significant social changes of the past century. The course is focused on revealing the social and cultural circumstances at the root of musical developments, regardless of the type of music (academic, pop/rock, alternative, etc.) The course introduces a vast number of terms and ideas that have influenced both music history, as well as many other fields of modern culture and life. Special attention is paid to the formation of the music industry as a separate and potent market. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, reading articles related to the history of music and modern history in general, engaging in class discussion, as well as writing short papers on various topics. The course may also include a research paper or class presentation as an individual or group project. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Music Theory (CHSS142)

Credits:3

This course aims to provide students with insight into basic understandings of elementary theory of classical music: Western notation system, musical intervals, chords and their progressions, key, scales, modality, rhythm and meter, as well as basics of classical harmony. The course is designed to enhance understanding of theoretical background of Western classical music, thus paving the way to studying more complex musical disciplines, such as Music Analysis, and Musical Composition. The students will learn both special musical terminology, and its practical use, so the connection between theory and musical practice will also be discussed. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, class discussion, reading, and a number of written assignments including theoretical exercise and basic analysis of musical samples. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Intro to French Language & Culture (CHSS151)

Credits:3

In this course, students will explore how French culture has been shaped by language, geography, historical events, and foreign and internal forces and groups. We will also examine how France and the French language have played an important role in the areas of culture, arts, cinema, fashion, and cuisine. The importance of the French language and culture has waxed and waned over the centuries, depending on France’s economic, political and military importance. French culture today is marked both by great ethnic, regional, and socio-economic diversity and by strong unifying tendencies. Through the study of a variety of sources including media, film, literature, and visual arts, students will gain an understanding of what constitutes the “French identity” of the 21st century.

 

Introduction to Korean Language and Culture (CHSS152)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the basics of Korean language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Korean society and economy. The course also explores Korean identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture. By the end of the course students should be familiar with simple phrases and the Korean alphabet and able to identify key Korean historic and cultural figures and events, and explain the salient features of Korean culture, its origins and evolution. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture (CHSS153)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the basics of Japanese language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Japanese society and economy. The course also explores the Japanese identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture. By the end of the course students should be familiar with simple phrases and the Japanese writing system and able to identify key Japanese historic and cultural figures and events, and explain the salient features of Japanese culture, its origins and evolution. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Armenian Society and Culture (CHSS154)

Credits:3

The course explores the development of Armenian society and culture through a comparative perspective. Topics include but are not limited to mythology, language, art, literature, education, and history. Lectures and discussion will focus on the formation of Armenian communities throughout the world; societal changes both in Armenia and within Armenian communities outside of Armenia; Armenia’s interactions with neighboring countries; and the effects and influences of social and cultural events on the formation of the identity of Armenians. Lectures and class discussions will be paired with literature referenced from ancient, medieval and contemporary scripts, legends, poems, novels, oral history, and some personal accounts of contemporaries.

 

Introduction to Russian Language and Culture (CHSS155)

Credits:3

Introduction to Russian Language & Culture explores the development of the Russian culture from historical and comparative perspectives. This course systematically covers the events, factors and figures that have shaped Russian civilization and worldview as reflected in literature, film and the arts. The course is designed to develop critical thinking and analytical skills through class discussions and projects about Russia’s past and present situation. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

Introduction to Latin Language and Culture (CHSS156)

Credits:3

Introduction to Latin Language & Culture aims to give students a working knowledge of Latin grammar sufficient to read basic texts and appreciate the rich literary and cultural heritage of the classical Latin tradition. Texts and culture will be considered in their historical context, with special emphasis on their continuing influence. In addition to excerpts from original texts, students will be exposed to more extended works of history, philosophy and culture in translation, with the aim of gaining insights into the sources of Western civilization. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

Introduction to Italian Language and Culture (CHSS157)

Credits:3

This course will explore the development of Italian culture in search of understanding “what makes an Italian Italian and Italy Italy.” Students will become acquainted with the historical events, internal and external, that have played major roles in developing and shaping Italy’s social makeup, unifying its culture, socio-economic system, philosophy of life, remaking of its geographical boundaries, creations of its diversified regions with their specific foods, music, arts and architectures. Students will be exposed to some characteristics of Italian language and learn some commonly used expressions including body-language. To develop a fuller understanding of the issues, students will use a variety of sources and resources—media, film, literature, and essays. Assessment includes papers, exams and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Introduction to Turkish Language and Culture (CHSS158)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the basics of the Turkish language, culture and history, current trends in Turkish politics, society and economy, as well as Armenian-Turkish relations. The course explores Turkey and broader Middle East through audio – visual (films, songs, speeches) and textual sources (scholarly works, news articles, policy papers, novels). By the end of the course students should be able to identify key Turkish historical and cultural figures and events, critically analyze and explain the genesis of modern Turkish politics and the impact of modernization on Turkey, and have novice level proficiency in simple Turkish. Assessment includes tests, papers, presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Introduction to Chinese Language & Culture (CHSS159)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the basics of Chinese language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Chinese society and economy. The course also explores Chinese identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture. The course familiarizes students with simple phrases and the Chinese writing system as well as key figures, events and features of Chinese culture, its origins and evolution. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Introduction to Arabic Language and Arab Culture (CHSS160)

Credits:3

This course explores Arab culture development over the course of 1400 years. Questions addressed will be What is Arab culture? How has Arab culture developed? Who is involved? As students are learning about critical points in history—beginning in the Hijaz with pre-Islamic time and the inception of Islam and then ending in the oil era’s hyper-capitalism’s capital of Dubai, they will focus on elements of culture, like music, art, and literature, and will be exposed to Arabic. Students will examine the Arab experience in several times and places to produce informed opinions about cultural transformations. In order to gain a well-rounded view of the internal shifts and stagnations, students will read significant works of poetry, story, religious doctrine, historical journals, novels, news articles, as well as watch movies and listen to music. Assessments will be based on essays, quizzes, and presentations.

 

Religion in America (CHSS170)

Credits:3

This course aims to explore religious diversity in America since the establishment of the first European colonies. The first part of the course covers the history of religious organizations in America and the formation of American religious diversity. The second part of the course examines the religious component of sociopolitical and socioeconomic life in the contemporary United States. The third part explores various religious traditions in the American religious landscape. Readings for the course include primary sources that elucidate the development of religious diversity in the U.S. as well as analytical readings by scholars of religion. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Introduction to Psychology (CHSS180)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of psychology and to the major topics of psychological inquiry. Topics include theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development and examines the lifecycle of humans from infancy to old age. An overview of current psychological theories explores topics such as types of temperament, physiological bases of behavior, life-span development, altered states of consciousness, sensation, perception, memory, thinking, motivation, emotion, personality, individual differences and stress. The course will also include basics of experimental psychology and introductory research methods. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

 

Introduction to Sociology (CHSS181)

Credits:3

This course explores how societies function and change over time. Students will use sociological concepts and theories to analyze human behavior, social life, social policies, and social change, both in their individual lives, in their communities, and in the global community at large. Throughout the course, students will evaluate social issues and problems taking into account the dynamic relationship between individuals and society. Topics might include ethnic relations, sexism, and class bias. Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

 

Introduction to Clinical Psychology (CHSS182)

Credits:3

Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. This introductory course will review theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development. We will examine the life cycle of man from infancy to old age. Personality disorders, neurosis, psychoses, substance abuse and developmental disabilities will be presented. The class will include assessment of the individual by clinical interview. The types of psychological tests that a clinical psychologist uses to assess individuals will be identified. An overview of current treatments of emotional disturbances with medication will be presented. Discussion of relevant topics in the field of clinical psychology will include ethics, educational, industrial, sports and forensic issues. Research methods will be introduced. The course will conclude with a review of current therapeutic modalities.

 

Statistics for Humanities and Social Sciences (CHSS183)

Credits:3

The course is designed to facilitate student learning to understand the underlying concepts and philosophy of statistics and why we use these concepts to interpret the world around us. The course will develop skillsets to properly interpret statistical applications provided in the humanities and social sciences literature and media sources, and to critique the misuse and proper use of statistics. Special emphasis will be placed on developing communication skills to properly explain the meaning of these findings to the general public. The course will also provide students practice with basic SPSS statistical applications using humanities/social science databases. Basic Gaussian statistics and the development and interpretation of scales will be covered. Students will be graded by quizzes and exams, group projects, oral presentations and participation. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and problem sets._x000D_ Not open to BAB, CS, DS, ES students.

 

Social Psychology (CHSS184)

Credits:3

Social psychology is the science of people, being people, around other people. This course will give students a sampling of the core theories and topics of modern social psychology, including research on conformity and obedience, altruism and aggression, attitude formation and change, and interpersonal and intergroup perception. The aim of this course is to give students understanding of how deeply human behavior is influenced by the social environment and how the scientific study of human social behavior can provide insight into the causes of, and possible cures for, a variety of current social problems. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Understanding Genocide (CHSS185)

Credits:3

Genocide is a crime against humanity that has occurred throughout history. This course will focus on genocide in the 20th and 21st centuries from legal, political, sociological, psychological, cultural, ethical, ethnic, religious, economic, historical and comparative perspectives. Special attention is paid to the Armenian Genocide, Jewish Holocaust, Rwandan Genocide, and other 20th and 21st century genocides, the Genocide Convention, the International Criminal Court, and other institutional and international responses to genocide. Prevention, intervention, deterrence, and remedies for genocide are also covered in the course, as well as genocide education and reconciliation. Assessment may include essays, examinations and presentations.

 

World Regional Geography (CHSS186)

Credits:3

World Regional Geography is an introduction to the discipline of geography and how the discipline makes sense of the vast complexity of cultures, economies, and environments around the world. This course is an introductory examination of global geography using the regional geography approach which gives context by breaking down continents into smaller geographical segments that share similar qualities – economics, culture, religion, environment, language, geopolitics, defense, security, economic viability, etc. – and allows for deeper understanding and better dialogue when discussing global issues. Upon completion, students should be able to describe variations in physical and cultural features of a region and demonstrate an understanding of their functional relationships. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

The Armenian Genocide (CHSS187)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the Armenian Genocide. Through first-person and other accounts as well as literature, art and other sources students will explore the history, context and political, social, and economic causes of the genocide, the process of implementation and the consequences of this crime against humanity. Assessment may include essays, projects, presentations, and quizzes.

 

The Holocaust (CHSS188)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the causes, context, and consequences of the Holocaust. Through primary and secondary sources students will examine thematic and chronological, theoretical, and political as well as other perspectives. Assessment may include essays, projects, presentations and quizzes.

 

Gender Perspectives (CHSS189)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to gender as a conceptual tool. It equips the students with perspectives that will enable them to analyze the power relations that constitute what we define as “gender politics.” In this course, students will explore the major theoretical discussions within the field of women’s, gender and sexuality studies. Students will read, hear, and watch experiences and perspectives from around the globe, with a specific focus on Armenia.

 

Armenian Heritage and Culture (CHSS190)

Credits:3

This course is aimed at taking on a few broad spheres of the Armenian world. More than one instructor will be offering multiple perspectives on the rich legacy of the nation through lectures and presentations that touch upon such topics as the origins of the Armenian people, twentieth-century Armenian history, including the Armenian Genocide, Soviet Armenia, and the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, plus other policy issue areas; an overview of the economy of the Republic of Armenia, including the role of the Diaspora in it; insights into the geography of Armenia, as well as environmental issues facing the country; and also the heritage of the Armenian Church.

 

Introduction to Classical Cultures (CHSS192)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to a few ancient cultures conventionally deemed “classical”. Through exposure to language, literature, history, philosophy, and art, students will gain an appreciation of the lasting impact that these cultures have had on world civilization. The question of what makes the classical will act as an overall theme of the critical engagement with the elements of culture under discussion. Students will be assessed based on class participation, in-class essays, and a final paper. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (CHSS194)

Credits:3

This course aims to introduce students to the basic concepts, ideas, approaches, and theories in cultural anthropology. The course material embraces various cultures throughout the globe, as well as different historical periods and covers a range of topics, such as race/ethnicity, language, religion, family, gender, ritual, health, kinship, etc. During the course, students will acquire analytical tools to critically engage with these concepts and phenomena, which are taken for granted in most societies. In addition, students will become familiar with the methods of ethnographic research and will conduct fieldwork throughout the course. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Introduction to Archaeology (CHSS195)

Credits:3

The course introduces students to world archaeology emphasizing its key achievements, concepts, practices, and importance to contemporary society. The most interdisciplinary among social sciences and the humanities, current archaeology integrates in its practice approaches and methods across different fields of human knowledge: from linguistics and art history to nuclear physics, biochemistry, computer science, and environmental studies. Special attention is devoted to the distinctive role of archaeology and cultural heritage management in the present and future of the Republic of Armenia and of the Armenian Diaspora. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

Archaeological Excavation Practice (CHSS196)

Credits:4

Students will be excavating the oldest sedentary agricultural community in the Southern Caucasus located in the Ararat plain of Armenia. The settlement named Masis Blur dates back 8000 year before present and contains remarkably well preserved architectural remains of the New Stone Age (Neolithic period), along with an abundance of stone and bone artifacts, which paint a detailed picture of vibrant life of the ancient inhabitants of the plain of Ararat. Students will have a unique opportunity to learn how to excavate mud-brick architecture, document archaeological contexts and artifacts, record scientific information, process finds in a laboratory setting, and catalogue them in a digital database. Students will have the opportunity to discover and apply their natural skills by documenting the finds through digital photography, illustration, and expand on their knowledge of statistical analysis.

 

Comparative Education (CHSS201)

Credits:3

The course explores the impact of political and cultural differences on educational systems around the world. Utilizing a comparative approach, emphasis is placed on contrasting educational systems and practice in various countries. Major themes include educational access and equity, educational reform movements, the effects of globalization on early childhood care, issues of gender and education, and social transformation in still-developing and industrialized countries. Various case studies will be examined, to provide a broader understanding of comparative research and analysis. A seminar-style learning environment characterizes this class, where alongside lectures, critical reflection on readings, student-led discussions, group presentations, and project-based collaborative work form the main teaching framework._x000D_ Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Perspectives in Education (CHSS202)

Credits:3

This course provides an overview of some key perspectives in education, tracing the path of educational thought from early Western thinkers up to contemporary trends in progressive education, and promoting critical thinking about how people should be educated. The course introduces several major educational theories and the application of methods of historical and philosophical inquiry to examine current issues in education, including school readiness, literacy, integration, inclusiveness, diversity, and equity. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Philosophy of Mind (CHSS203)

Credits:3

This course approaches mind from two points of view: psychological and philosophical, including the overlap between them. The course explores the philosophical assumption of the existence of the mind and various religious conceptions of the soul as notions of mind. The course starts from Descartes’s effort to establish there is a mind (at least his own, to begin with), moving to the reactions to the Cartesian views, which resonated with the scientific revolution of his time and continue to frame the discourse about mind. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Bioethics (CHSS204)

Credits:3

Bioethics is the critical study of ethical problems arising from medicine, healthcare and the biological sciences. In this course students will discuss ethical questions surrounding topics including abortion, euthanasia, animal experimentation, health resource allocation, organ donation, medical paternalism, genetic intervention, and human cloning. Assessment may include essay writing, group participation, and quizzes/exams. Instructor-led class time.

 

Learning, activism, and social movements (CHSS205)

Credits:3

This course will explore the role of knowledge production and education in social change. The focus of the course will be on experiential, transformative, social and political learning in social movements organized with the intention of bringing about social change. As such, a rich tapestry of historical and contemporary, international and local social movements will be examined including feminist, labour, anti-poverty, environmental, global justice and indigenous ones among others, with a particular focus on theories and practices of adult learning and education in such movements. The class will be conducted in seminar-style, where alongside lectures, critical reflection on readings, student-led discussions, group presentations, and project-based collaborative work form the main teaching framework.

 

Lens on Armenia: Photojournalism in Yerevan (1,4) (CHSS206)

Credits:3

In this course students will learn digital photography as it relates to the journalistic process, documentary work and fine art. Students will examine professional photography, techniques for image capture and camera handling and works, as well as post-production methods in order to tell visual narratives. Students will create individual and group portfolios for exhibition. Assignments are designed to help students attain solid photo coverage of the topics and issues in Yerevan or throughout Armenia. Excursions in Yerevan neighborhoods and possibly to sites outside of Yerevan will help students appreciate the history and culture of Yerevan. Students should have a camera with them in class every day. Some phone cameras are sufficient. Some cameras may be available for check out on campus on a first come first serve basis.

 

Philosophy, Politics and Economics Seminar (CHSS210)

Credits:3

This course integrates the methods of the three component disciplines of the PPE minor. Students will apply the methods, theories and concepts learned in philosophy, politics and economics courses to various problems or policy challenges. The course aims to enable students to analyze, propose, and defend policies from an integrated perspective. Students will study a selection of readings on philosophy, politics and economics, propose their own policy study, and write a paper critically analyzing different policy options.

 

Great Books (CHSS211)

Credits:3

 

In this course students will perform close reading of classic texts in political philosophy and ethics and engage in class discussion and written reflection on the texts, comparing and tracing the evolution of key ideas with reference, as appropriate, to other texts, historical context and contemporary issues. Texts vary from year to year, drawn from different traditions and eras (e.g., Greek, Roman, European, Armenian, Russian, Eastern, American, ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary). The course does not assume background in political theory or philosophy, but does expect students to spend significant time on reading and preparing for class discussion.

 

 

Epistemology & Philosophy of Science (CHSS212)

Credits:3

This course discusses fundamental issues related to knowledge and science. The course addresses fundamental epistemological questions such as: What is knowledge? Is knowledge possible? What is truth and what are criteria of truth? Is there a priori knowledge? On what grounds is knowledge justified? What is the difference between science and truth? The course will also discuss central issues philosophy of science, such as the nature and limits of scientific knowledge, theories of scientific progress and social status of science, and differences between of natural and social sciences. Assessment will include papers, exams and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Symbolic Logic (CHSS213)

Credits:3

This course is a comprehensive introduction to symbolic logic. Topics include forms of thought, basics of categorical logic, propositional logic, predicate logic and inductive logic. In this course students will develop critical thinking skills by identifying formal structures of arguments and debates, evaluating arguments from logical standpoint, and devising ways of improving fallacious arguments. In this course students will analyze texts in natural languages and ‘translate’ them into symbolic language and back, solve problems of symbolic logic and explore ways of using symbolic logic outside the classroom.

 

Survey and Polling (CHSS215)

Credits:3

Decision making in the many fields relies on the ability to conduct research and critically interpret data. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of survey research, advancing their understanding and skills in social science research methodologies. Students will critically analyze data and results from survey research and public opinion polls. They will also learn how to collect, analyze and interpret original survey data. Assignments may include reading, individual and group projects, fieldwork, written assignments, and oral presentations. Instructor-led discussions/class time including discussions and tasks.

 

The Study of History (CHSS220)

Credits:3

The course explores one singularly important question: how do we know what we think we know about human societies and ourselves from the perspective of history, which underlies the theories and philosophies of historical research. It analyzes the development of historical thinking in the course of nearly five thousand years – from the discovery of linear time in the Ancient Near East to the current research in globalization. Explorations of social and intellectual processes shaping the search for facts, construction of historical narratives, transmission of historical memory, and interpretations of the goals and meaning of history are at the core of this course. This is an interactive course consisting of instructor’s introductory lectures to the study of each specific topic and students’ proactive work with primary sources, complemented by analysis of major texts, artifacts, and concepts. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Ancient Near East: History and Civilizations (CHSS221)

Credits:3

A critical survey of the history and civilizations of the Ancient Near East from the earliest times to the collapse of_x000D_ the Iranian Achaemenid Empire during the conquests of Alexander of Macedon in the fourth century BCE. The_x000D_ course explores especially the origins of human culture and foundations of civilizations, the revolutionary growth_x000D_ of technologies from the emergence of agriculture to the Iron Age; economies, ideologies, and authority in first_x000D_ pristine states, social stratification, secondary state formation, the formation of world’s first empires and first_x000D_ steps toward globalization. Geographically it covers Egypt, the Levant, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, the Armenian_x000D_ Highland, Caucasus, Iran, and the southern part of Central Asia, at the same time focusing on the diversity of_x000D_ pathways in human history. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Soviet Armenia (CHSS222)

Credits:3

 

The course aims to explore the legacy of Soviet Armenia from various perspectives: political, economic, social and cultural. The course with use sectoral as well as historical approaches to the analysis of the Soviet modernization model and its lasting impact on Armenia, through case studies and comparative analysis. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations. This language of instruction in this course is Armenian and uses Armenian-language course materials.

 

 

The Modern Middle East: Peoples, States and Societies (CHSS225)

Credits:3

In this course students will explore the ethnic and religious minorities in the modern Middle East. Through lectures, discussions and examination of primary and secondary sources students will critically examine the concept and role of religious and ethnic minorities in state policies and the relations between minorities, majorities and states in the wider region between Egypt and Iran. Students will discuss the meanings and limits of concepts such as “coexistence”, “tolerance”, “cosmopolitanism,” and “pluralism.”

 

Asian Art (CHSS230)

Credits:3

An iconographic and aesthetic analysis of the three principal Asian religious traditions: Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic. Study of painting, sculpture and architecture as reflective of various cultures’ definitions of the Divine, life and the afterlife and value structures. Emphasis on the silk route and migration of style. Exams and final paper. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Armenian Visual Traditions: Illuminated Manuscripts (CHSS231)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the visual traditions of historical Armenia from the ancient period to the seventeenth century. The study of Armenian painting is largely a study of illuminated manuscripts, their texts, illustration and ornamentation. Students will become familiar with the methods of Medieval and Early Modern Armenian book illustration, codicology, paleography, and the history of the book as art object in the Armenian literary experience. In addition to examining individual illustrations in their original contexts, the course will consider the role of individual artists in transforming manuscript illumination without the infrastructure of traditional “schools” of painting. This course will include trips to local collections of Armenian manuscripts, including the Matenadaran where students will view and analyze manuscripts as well as other works on exhibit. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Topics in Western Art History (CHSS232)

Credits:3

This course introduces works of art and monumental architecture as complex cultural repositories from ancient civilizations of the West to the present. While exploring Western art, architecture and objects, students will gain familiarity with artists, their artworks and the historical contexts under which these works were conceived and produced. The course emphasizes close looking and visual analysis while using theories of visualization and visuality to examine the phenomena of cultural production and the consumption of a range of media. The course examines how images and objects function, and how they mediate what we see and experience. This course will provide students with the tools to accurately and describe works of art, iconography, stylistic developments, and the cultural and historical contexts of various sculptures, paintings and architecture. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Creative Productions (CHSS233)

Credits:3

Creative Production is an advanced, interdisciplinary course covering the theory, analysis and practice of producing creative works in various media. The theoretical component has two inter-related elements: (1) Articles on the theories on creativity, imagination, aesthetic emotions, (2) Works of Art (literature, film, animation, TV, fine art and photography, etc.) carefully chosen as illustrative examples of those theories. The practical component includes different creative exercises, experiences, workshops, etc., and a semester-long creative production (written work, theater monologue/duologue/scene, musical video, short film script, photo stories etc.) that students will choose to realize individually or in a team. This final production will be accompanied by a reflection paper. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Cultural Policy and Arts Management (CHSS234)

Credits:3

This course presents the theory and practice of cultural policy and arts management, models and instruments of cultural policy, specifics of international cultural relations, legal issues on international and national levels. The course explores interrelation of culture with economy, tourism, education, problems of cultural heritage protection, museum and art gallery management. Other topics include different types of governmental support for culture, public-private partnership, community and civil society role, public relations in cultural institutions and projects, and engagement of media industry and information technologies for promoting culture and art._x000D_ Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Women/Gender and the Visual Arts (CHSS235)

Credits:3

Western artistic production and criticism has been monopolized by male heterosexual spectatorship. The result has been an artistic tradition beset with gendered perceptions and a discourse whose objective is to regulate and marginalize the voices of “others.” It is therefore necessary to reread the texts and look afresh at art to expose the fallacies. Topics to be discussed include: mythmaking, the formulation of sexual ideals of beauty, spectatorship and the gaze, feminist theory, gay studies, naked/nude, and constructs of pornography. Exams and papers foster a critical mindset and a sensitivity to biases latent within the realm of art. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Baroque Era (CHSS236)

Credits:3

This course aims to explore the developments in Europe during the Enlightenment through the lens of the aesthetic category of the Baroque. The course examines the distinctive characteristics of the cultural, social and political spheres in the Baroque era, their interdependence, and their continuing relevance. Through close analysis of texts, political, music, painting, architecture, and intellectual history, students will develop critical thinking skills, the ability to distinguish aesthetic eras and draw parallels across disciplines, and learn to view cultures from different perspectives, while gaining knowledge that will enable life-long learning and enrich their appreciation of the lasting legacy of the Baroque. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

20th Century Art (CHSS237)

Credits:3

20th Century Art is a survey of major fine art developments in Europe and the United States from post-impressionism to post-modernism. Media discussed include painting, sculpture and architecture. Assessment may include tests, short assignments and longer papers with focuses on theoretical and critical approaches to the analysis of art. Instructor-led class time and may include off-campus excursions.

 

Psychology of Gender (CHSS238)

Credits:3

The course explores the major theories and central argument in gender studies and human development, and addresses the impact of socio-economic, political, cultural and psychological forces on the development and reinforcement of gender discourse and practice. Students will explore the process of gender socialization and formation of gender roles to unearth why and how social norms, expectations and opportunities are related to gender, and how they affect the experience of gender throughout a person’s life.

 

The Age of Enlightenment (CHSS239)

Credits:3

In this course students will explore the intellectual and artistic developments throughout the Classical era through comprehensive analysis of music, texts, paintings, and historical events. Instructor-led class may include lectures, live/virtual performances of music, seminars, readings, analyses of music and paintings.

 

Music & Literature (CHSS240)

Credits:3

This course looks at the cross-disciplinary connections between literature and music. Having a long history of mutual influence, literature and music share common concepts and historical contexts. These commonalities are examined from the point of view of stage works, such as operas and ballets based on classical fiction literature or religious texts; other vocal or choral compositions based on works by great poets; program music directly influenced by literature or philosophical texts; common use of different terms regarding the prosody; existence of certain common musical and literary forms, as well as musical influences in literature and/or poetry and comparison of different styles in both spheres. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, extensive reading (both classical literature and articles or research papers on different literature- and music-related topics), engaging in class discussion and presentations, as well as writing short papers.

 

Armenian Music (CHSS241)

Credits:3

In this course students will explore Armenian music from its origins to the present. Armenian music will be considered in the broader context of world music and will include connections between music and literature, theater, other fields of culture, and history. Students will engage in learning through lectures and discussions, listening to music in and out of class, readings, and musical performance attendance.

 

Professional Communication in Armenian (CHSS250)

Credits:3

This course is designed to give students a comprehensive view of the scope and importance of professional communication in a variety of settings in Armenian. The course aims to develop students’ writing, speaking, and interpersonal skills and specific tools for communicating in professional environments. Students will learn practical skills including writing letters, resumes, proposals, managing meetings and dealing with conflict. The course is intended for native-Armenian speakers and will be taught in Armenian.

 

Topics in Cinema (CHSS251)

Credits:3

Cinema is a “universal language”, a multidimensional medium for telling stories and portraying reality from different perspectives to large, diverse and often dispersed audiences through sight and sound. Topics in Cinema examines a wide range of subjects in global cinema relating to both the artistry and socio-cultural significance of movies. The course will explore such topics as genre, international cinema, film criticism, and the role of film in society as it touches on such subjects as cultural identity, history, race and gender, and societal change. Instructor-led film viewing and discussion, along with reading and writing assignments.

 

Russian Professional Communication (CHSS255)

Credits:3

This course is designed for those who are proficient in the Russian language and who would like to feel confident using Russian language in professional life. This course focuses on developing oral and written skills in the business setting and emphasizes memo writing, business letters, publicity, oral reporting, interviewing and professional presentations. Assessment may include papers, written and oral presentations, and exams.

 

Latin Language & Literature (CHSS256)

Credits:3

This course aims to deepen the knowledge and understanding of Latin language and literature and their role in the evolution of European culture and society. Students will acquire a higher level of Latin reading knowledge through study of excerpts from original texts. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between Latin and English (vocabulary, phraseology and syntax). The course will involve study and research of Medieval European societies, culture, religion (Christianity), education, literature, philosophy and architecture. Assessment will include exams, papers, and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Armenian Literature in Perspective (CHSS261)

Credits:3

This course exposes students to a variety of texts by Armenian and non-Armenian writers focusing on a specific historical period. Students will study the literary values of these texts to gain an understanding of how literary texts construct and reflect the collective imagination of that period. In this respect, the course discusses literary texts as the materialized aspirations of their authors on the one hand, and as the collective dream of a community on the other hand. The particular historical period will change each semester. _x000D_ _x000D_ The course is based on a semester-long student research project. In the beginning of the semester, each student chooses a cultural issue that he/she is interested in. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Russian Language & Literature (CHSS262)

Credits:3

This course, to be taught in Russian, is designed to introduce students to selected masterpieces of Russian literature and to improve their ability to read complex written works. Through understanding the biographical and historical context, main ideas, aesthetic principles and literary techniques of the most prominent Russian writers, students will develop research, writing and discussion skills that will be transferable to various disciplines and professions. Assessment will include papers, essay, exams and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Comparative Religion (CHSS272)

Credits:3

The course examines world religious traditions from a comparative perspective. Students will be introduced to the basic tenets, worldview, and practices of the major religious traditions around the world, polytheistic traditions, Asian religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, as well as new religious movements. The course will also examine the sacred texts of various religions. Upon completing the course, students should be familiar with the key beliefs and practices of the major religions and gain an appreciation of the diversity of religious experience through time and across cultures. The course also aims to equip students with concepts and frames for thinking critically about the relationship of Christianity to other religious traditions and comparing the dogmatic, doctrinal and ritualistic practices within various religious traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Clinical Psychology (CHSS280)

Credits:3

Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. This course will review theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development. We will examine the life cycle of man from infancy to old age. Personality disorders, neurosis, psychoses, substance abuse and developmental disabilities will be presented. The class will include assessment of the individual by clinical interview. The types of psychological tests that a clinical psychologist uses to assess individuals will be identified. An overview of current treatments of emotional disturbances with medication will be presented. Discussion of relevant topics in the field of clinical psychology will include ethics, educational, industrial, sports and forensic issues. Research methods will be introduced. The course will conclude with a review of current therapeutic modalities. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

 

Human Development & Personality (CHSS281)

Credits:3

 

This course provides an overview of the major theories and topics in human development and to the major topics in personality formation. Topics include theories on normal human growth and the human lifecycle from infancy to old age, with special attention to learning, temperament, personality. Special attention will be paid to childhood development. Upon completing the course, student should gain an understanding of how human thinking, learning, and physical abilities vary and evolve at different ages and stages, and how these various aspects of development influence one another. Assessment includes tests, paper, case studies and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

 

 

Trade (CHSS282)

Credits:3

This course examines the international trade system and the economic concepts and political institutions upon which it is based. Topics covered include a brief history of the development of trade, players and processes involved in trade, the role of trade in development, trade policy and politics, comparative and competitive advantages of nations, gains and losses from trade, international trade negotiations, and effects of regionalization and globalization. The course has an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on case-studies, theory and empirical studies. Students will be expected to make individual and group presentations and engage in case-study analysis in discussion. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Trust (CHSS283)

Credits:3

The course explores the role of trust in projects, institutions, organizations, society, and personal relationships as affected by psychological, social, legal, human, technical and other factors. Through experiential learning, students will explore how to measure, monitor, and develop trust, and utilize it in managing situations and approaching life in a synergistic and constructive way.

 

Genocide Studies and Human Rights Seminar (CHSS285)

Credits:3

This upper-level interdisciplinary course explores in-depth one or more themes the phenomenon of genocide as a gross violation of human rights through class discussion, research and presentations. Themes may include genocide prevention and education, genocide reparations and remedies, genocide interventions and righteous/rescuers, and will vary from year to year. Assessment based on class preparation, contribution to class discussion, final presentation. _x000D_ Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Comparative Genocide (CHSS286)

Credits:3

In this course students will explore in-depth themes related to the phenomenon of genocide with emphasis on a comparative analysis of the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Cambodian genocide, and Rwandan genocides. Themes include causes, similarities and peculiarities of these genocides, perpetrators/rescuers issues, genocide reparations and remedies, international reaction, genocide prevention. Assessment may include essays, projects, presentations, and quizzes.

 

Modern turkey (CHSS288)

Credits:3

 

This course explores the history of modern Turkey, from the late Ottoman Empire to the present, focusing on current trends in politics, culture and society, and situating Turkey within the broader history of the Middle East and the Caucasus. Topics may include but are not limited to nationalism, religion, revolution, violence, militarism, authoritarianism, modernization, and Armeno-Turkish relations. Assessment may include tests, papers, and presentations.

 

 

Cultural Geography (CHSS290)

Credits:3

This course is an interdisciplinary course that uses cultural habitats as a window on how individuals and groups develop their societies and way of life, coexisting with neighbors and shaping and being shaped by their environment. Geographers study ‘culture’ to understand the ways in which culture is constructed, maintained, diffused, and sometimes contested within space and place. The diversity of human culture is embedded in our shared geographies and is used as a force of inclusion, exclusion, and power. This course examines the varied perspectives and processes that shape our everyday experiences and seeks to raise awareness of the plurality of cultural landscapes. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Modernism (CHSS291)

Credits:3

This course is designed to develop students’ skills in analysis, critical thinking, and communication. From 1890-1950 the western world went through a profound transformation that involved industrialization, two world wars, the erosion of colonialism, the rise of psychology, Fascism, Communism, and other massive historical events. At the same time, there was an explosion of innovative literary and artistic output to make sense of all these intense changes: it became a movement known as Modernism. In this course students will engage with various modernist texts which may include poetry, fiction, essays, and also art, films, and music. They will be expected to keep a reading journal and/or write in-class responses to readings. Students will be required to participate in class discussions and give one presentation to the class. There will be a mid-term exam, final exam, quizzes, as well as written assignments. Three hours of instructor-led discussions per week, along with in-class and take home assignments.

 

Gender and Social Change (CHSS292)

Credits:3

This course is an interdisciplinary women’s studies course with a global perspective, covering various theoretical and empirical approaches from the humanities and social sciences and political, economic and cultural perspectives. The course explores the dynamic ways in which gender is defined and evolves, as a social institution, and how those definitions affect power relations in society, including issues of class, race, ethnicity, and politics, and the impact of gender equality on development outcomes. The course will also take a comparative perspective, looking the local situation in an effort to understanding the role of women in the family and society. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Armenian Studies (CHSS293)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the Armenian Studies as an interdisciplinary subject, including sources and artifacts of Armenian history and culture, research methods, digital and other resources. Topics include ancient and modern written sources, secondary sources, schools of thought, comparative and historical approaches to literature, art, music, and other aspects of Armenian studies. This course will be taught in Armenian. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Advanced Studies in Gender (CHSS294)

Credits:3

In this course students will engage in close reading of relevant literature exploring theories and methodologies in Gender Studies to analyze the ways in which gender works in society. Students will examine the genealogy of gender as a concept through various schools of thought.

 

Special Topics in the Arts (CHSS295)

Credits:3

Course description tailored to course content when offered.

 

Special Topics in Social Sciences (CHSS296)

Credits:3

Course description tailored to course content when offered.

 

Research Projects in Gender Studies (CHSS297)

Credits:3

This course directs students to identify major questions in Gender Studies and design a research project. The course will equip students with a deep understanding of qualitative research methods in Gender Studies both in terms of collecting data and ways of interpretation. It will acquaint them with discussions of politics of knowledge production and feminist situated ethics of ethnography. The course will also focus on developing the project and learning how to use methods such as narrative, visual, and sound analysis, self-study, biographical and autobiographical inquiry in their fieldwork and post-fieldwork processes. _x000D_ _x000D_ The class will be conducted in seminar-style, where alongside lectures, critical reflection on readings, student-led discussions, presentations, and project-based collaborative work form the main teaching framework.

 

Independent Study (CHSS298)

Credits:3

 

 

The Scientific Method and Critical Thinking (CSE111)

Credits:3

Science and technology proficiency is indispensable for functioning in modern societies. We are overwhelmed with instant information in all sensory formats and we must be able to discriminate between facts and fallacies, while recognizing our own underlying biases. In this course, the student is introduced to the basic tenets of the scientific method, critical thinking and illustrated real world examples and case studies, with several general topics examined in depth. Such topics includes: pharmaceutical studies, computer performance claims, climate change, emerging technologies, marketing and advertisement, international relations, political and partisan hyperbole.

 

Mathematical Thinking (CSE112)

Credits:3

Students will explore and develop quantitative analysis and numeracy skills, rooted in logic-based intuition, that are essential to succeed regardless of profession. In this course, students will expand critical thinking skills in the context of understanding and analyzing data and presenting findings/conclusions through the practical application of mathematical theories, principles and techniques rooted in algebra, calculus, probability and statistics in subjects such as demographics, finance, medicine, politics and economics. Through the use of advanced Microsoft Excel functions and formulas, students will expand problem-solving skills. Students will prepare oral and written reports that utilize concepts of the effective visual display of quantitative information to optimize how to summarize and explain mathematical solutions that emphasize clear and effective communication. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments._x000D_ Not open to CS, DS, ES students.

 

Introduction to the World of Programming (CSE120)

Credits:3

This course covers the topics related to the role of computers in our everyday life. Topics include high level overview of: history of computers, the architecture of personal computers, mobile devices and other smart gadgets, the structure of internet and cloud, search engines, data storages, data analytics tools, information management tools and information security. Students will learn to write basic programs, implement basic algorithms, collect and store data, browse the data in the web with smart search engines and which is very important understand the key areas of information security. This course is designed for students with no prior background of computer science. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, and practical assignments._x000D_ Not open to Students will explore and develop quantitative analysis and numeracy skills, rooted in logic-based intuition, that are essential to succeed regardless of profession. In this course, students will expand critical thinking skills in the context of understanding and analyzing data and presenting findings/conclusions through the practical application of mathematical theories, principles and techniques rooted in algebra, calculus, probability and statistics in subjects such as demographics, finance, medicine, politics and economics. Through the use of advanced Microsoft Excel functions and formulas, students will expand problem-solving skills. Students will prepare oral and written reports that utilize concepts of the effective visual display of quantitative information to optimize how to summarize and explain mathematical solutions that emphasize clear and effective communication. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments._x000D_ Not open to CS, DS, ES students.

 

Technology Marketing (CSE130)

Credits:3

This course covers marketing from the perspective of high technology products, services, and industries. Students will learn the process of introducing and explaining how relatively complex products or technologies work: writing collateral, white papers, presentations, competitive market analysis, technical intelligence analysis, and how to develop an integrated digital marketing strategy. This course is for students with technical or non-technical backgrounds who wish to understand marketing in technological ecosystems. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, presentations, exams, and projects.

 

Industrial Technologies (CSE131)

Credits:3

The course will explore several industrial technologies, with an aim for students to familiarize themselves with both traditional as well as modern innovative business practices. Examples of these industrial technologies may include metallurgy, construction industry, chemical production, lighting technologies, semiconductor manufacturing and other cutting edge “technologies of tomorrow.” While no prior experience or knowledge of these technologies is expected, students will gain firsthand exposure to real production processes and appreciation of product lifecycles including environmental and technological. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, essays, exams, and projects.

 

Understanding Data (CSE141)

Credits:3

In this course students will explore the fundamental concepts of data, starting with the basics of descriptive statistics and ending with data visualization. Students will learn how data is used and misused, discover patterns in data, and present data to make actionable decisions. The models and methods may be applied in different fields such as business, social sciences, health care, sports, etc. While software will be used, no prior knowledge in programming or statistics is necessary for the course. [not open to DS students]

 

Geographic Industrial Systems (CSE145)

Credits:3

This course is meant to introduce students to geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial analysis: setting up, analysing, visualizing, and solving problems using data and maps. With advancements in the information technologies more and more industries are relying on GIS to analyse and visualize data. This course will look at applications of GIS in environmental sciences, public health, sustainable transportation planning, land use mapping, telecommunications, hydrology, meteorology, police dispatching, crime patterns, etc. The course will also look at remote sensing technologies like radar, LiDAR, GPS, and the role they play in collecting and analysing data. Another aim of this course is to spark interest in different types of students: from students interested in learning about GIS, to future professionals in fields regularly using GIS, to data enthusiasts and software developers. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Cybersecurity and Society (CSE150)

Credits:3

 

“Cybersecurity and Society” is a comprehensive interdisciplinary course focusing on the link between cyberspace and the social,
political, and legal systems in national and international governance. Before introducing the cyberspace as a domain in policy, governance, and national security the course delves into the fundamental technical aspects of cybersecurity, covering the principles of network security, data encryption, threat detection, and risk assessment. Students will gain a robust technical understanding crucial to navigating the complex cybersecurity landscape as well as knowledge concerning the role of
cybersecurity in modern politics and warfare, the main approaches to online governance and regulation, the intersection of datafication, data privacy and human rights. To cultivate these skills, the course utilities multimedia content, and offers practical exercises and case studies in cybersecurity policy-making. Students will gain comprehensive insights into how cybersecurity policies and procedures intertwine with larger societal constructs, equipping them with a flexible toolkit to influence the future of cyberspace and national security.

Not open to CS students.

 

 

Introduction to Energy Sources (CSE151)

Credits:3

Energy drives the human civilization, and any economic growth or poverty alleviation directly involves use of energy resources. This course serves as an introduction to various sources of energy and the mechanisms to harness and convert them to more useful types of energy. Fossil fueled, solar, hydro and nuclear sources and some of their effects on the environment and safety issues will be discussed. This course fulfills general education requirements of the American University of Armenia. There are no prerequisites for this course beyond basic mathematical skills. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Introduction to Bioscience (CSE162)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to important concepts, techniques and applications of bioscience, and explores its impact on research, business and society. Students will study basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, computational biology and biotechnology. Some important applications of molecular and cellular biology in medicine and industry – such as molecular diagnostics of diseases, stem cell and transplantation, drug design and genetically modified foods – will be introduced. Students will also discuss the political, ethical, and legal issues accompanying these topics and their current and future impact on society. Three hours of instructorled class time per week.

 

Introduction to Chemistry (CSE165)

Credits:3

This course aims to build knowledge of general chemistry required to understand links between chemical research and health science. Nowadays chemistry helps to solve many problems arising in the world. Chemists frequently get inspiration from living things to design new medications, safer chemical reactions and to solve environmental problems arising from human activities. Students will attend lectures and engage in group work on basic chemistry topics. Students will also engage in literature research and interpretation aiming to develop the skills necessary to read and understand research on toxicology, modern developments in chemistry linked to and/or inspired from living things. At the end of the semester, students will present projects on chemistry and health topics. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week._x000D_ Not open to ES students and to DS students in the Bioinformatics track.

 

Chemistry in Everyday Life (CSE170)

Credits:3

 

 

Conceptual Physics (CSE171)

Credits:3

This course will explore the basic concepts in physics and physical processes. The conceptual viewpoint taken in the course will focus more on the physical description of the processes and phenomena rather than the detailed mathematical equations that govern them. The course will cover topics in mechanics of moving bodies, heat transfer, propagation of sound, properties of light, electricity and magnetism with special emphasis on everyday experience and practical illustrations taken from real life, e.g. art, music, sports, the home. For each of the processes covered in the course, a brief historical perspective will be given, followed by a description of its physical principles, and finally the basic equations that describe it mathematically. Students will be exposed to real-life applications of the theories discussed in the classroom. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week._x000D_ Not open to CS, DS, ES students.

 

Relativity (CSE175)

Credits:3

The course explains Einstein’s Theory of Relativity without requiring science background. The explanation of the theory demands no prior knowledge of mathematics or physics beyond an ability to do simple arithmetic. The first portion of the course introduces some of the main concepts of the theory and discusses experimental tests by using no more than arithmetic and simple geometry. The further progress requires algebra and more advanced mathematical techniques. The concepts are explained in a way accessible to beginners, i.e. those without a background on physics. Three hours of intruction-led class time per week.

 

Creativity and Technological Innovation (CSE181)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to creativity and its elements, the creative mind and thinking, techniques, concepts and applications leading to technological innovations. Lectures will provide examples of creative thinking and technological innovations from real life creators and technology innovators whose work is well known. Students will work in groups. Each group will create a technological project attempting to solve a real life need based on the knowledge gained and discussed during the semester. Students will be introduced to various problem-solving techniques. Upon completion of this couse, students will be able to think creatively and they will be familiar with the process of technological innovation and innvention. Three hours of intruction-led class time per week.

 

Engineering for Non Engineers (CSE190)

Credits:3

This course aims to give students an insight about basic principles of engineering and its different sub-disciplines. The course will explore the role engineering has played in shaping society today through its various advancements in different fields, e.g. manufacturing, the energy sector, urban development and materials engineering. Student evaluation will be based on individual or group projects, research essays and written examinations. Instructor-led class time._x000D_ Not open to ES students.

 

Historical Development of Mathematical Ideas (CSE210)

Credits:3

This course will provide an exploration into the history, birth and development of mathematical ideas, problems and people behind them. A variety of topics will be covered, such as: infinity and paradoxes; numbers and set theory; algebraic equations and algebra; limits and calculus; shapes, symmetry and geometry; gambling, uncertainty and probability; physics and differential equations; choice and game theory; data analysis and statistics. Students are required to complete problem sets and quizzes, and to complete a group project, as well to conduct collaborative research. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

 

Tomorrow’s Technologies (CSE220)

Credits:3

What is technology? Why it is so crucial to constantly improve or develop new theories based on observation and apply scientific methods toward the creation of innovative products. How are scientific theories developed? Regarding the creation process, what is the role of engineers, of society and of government? In this course students will deepen their understanding of design and development of cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, such as quantum computers, organic displays, and artificially-grown materials. Applications of these new technologies are poised to revolutionize industries such as health care, energy use, and consumer goods. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments, projects, and exams.

 

Nanotechnology: Science and Application (CSE221)

Credits:3

Nanotechnology: Science and Application is a multidisciplinary course which presents an overview of the main aspects of the emerging field of Nanotechnology. Students will become acquainted with a set of disciplines which form the scientific basis upon which Nanotechnology research and applications are developing. Students will also gain familiarity with examples of nanotechnology applications in evolved or emerging industries, such as agriculture, consumer goods, aerospace, electronics, etc. The course covers basic principles from the fields of physics, chemistry, and engineering to enable students to implement a synthesizing project. There are no prerequisites other than high-school level mathematics and physical/natural science. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, essays, exams, and projects.

 

Music Technology (CSE230)

Credits:3

The course investigates properties of the rudimentary element of music – sound, by exploring musical acoustics, psychoacoustics, analog and digital audio technologies such as electroacoustics and innovative designs of audio transducers (microphones, speakers, headsets, earbuds, binaural systems), acoustical properties for musical reproduction spaces (from recording studios to concert halls and immersive audio setups), in addition to presenting digital audio workstations for audio manipulation and multimedia content creation (including commercials, films, gaming, VR, etc). Instructor led discussions and lectures, assessment by projects, homework, and exams.

 

Data Mining (CSE241)

Credits:3

 

The goal of the course is to present the basic concepts of data analytics, starting from the basics of descriptive _x000D_ statistics and ending with applications of text mining. Students will learn how the statistics is used to model uncertainty, discover patterns in data and make actionable decisions. Basic methods of statistical inference and predictive modeling will be covered. At the end of the class several advanced methods of data mining (boosting trees and neural networks) will be presented. The models and methods will be applied in different fields such as business, social sciences, health care, sports, etc. We will use open source analytical software R in doing statistical calculations. The students will also learn how to participate in world’s leading data mining competitions. No prior knowledge in programming or experience with R is necessary for the course. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Not open to DS students.

 

 

Quantitative Biology (CSE262)

Credits:3

Biology has long been considered a descriptive science with few components in research methods. Since the discovery of the DNA structure and advances in genetics and biotechnology, biology has evolved into an exact and quantitative science. Today, biology uses tools adapted from statistics, mathematics, big data management systems and high performance computing. This course presents state-of-the-art computational biology, provides hands-on experience with tools and approaches for scientific computing in biology, and discusses current and upcoming challenges of transforming biological data into biological knowledge.

 

Human Physiology (CSE263)

Credits:3

This course aims to build knowledge regarding the interrelationship between the nine organ systems responsible for the healthy functioning of the human body. Analysis will encompass from cells and tissues to the entire organism, underpinning the role of major structures supporting physiological processes. Important diseases will be discussed, including their causes and consequences as examples of disturbed homeostasis and dysfunction of human body systems. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

 

The Human Brain (CSE264)

Credits:3

The course will cover an introduction to the brain anatomy and the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. The work of human brain in health and in some disorders as well as the mechanisms of vision, learning, memory, feelings and emotions will be discussed. _x000D_ Applications of the knowledge may be relevant in a variety of realms including for marketing specialists, user interface and software developers as well as public policy makers and educators. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

 

Genetics (CSE265)

Credits:3

An introductory course in genetics and their impact on society and life. Students will explore DNA, genes and chromosomes, classical Mendelian concepts, genetics in the real world, the ethics associated with advancing gene technology and applications, genetic diseases and genomics.

 

Sports Analytics (CSE270)

Credits:3

 

Professional sport organizations are using analytics to make better decisions on team formation, playing strategy etc. Enthusiasts use analytics to predict the outcome of a sporting event and to try to quantify reasons that lead to victory. The course will examine how different statistical and data analytics methods can be used to analyze game-day (in-play) sports data and for pre- and post-game sports performance modelling. We will focus on several team games, e.g. soccer, basketball, American football and baseball. The course will use a statistical programming language such as R and assessment may include problem sets, individual or group projects and written examinations. 

DS students can take the course as a free elective, not as a general education course.

 

 

Number Statistics and the Environment (CSE271)

Credits:3

The course is a practical introduction to general quantitative and statistical techniques that can be applied to geography and environmental studies. Students will learn techniques to verify quality of data, analyzing trends and tendencies, and estimating probability of outcomes. The course will also cover topics such as proposing and verifying hypotheses using numbers and statistical analysis. Each topic will begin with an introduction to a numerical or statistical concept followed by the application of that concept on a real world environmental problem. As the course progresses, students will also be introduced to software that utilizes these concepts. Problem sets and written examinations. Instructor led class time.

 

Design Thinking (CSE281)

Credits:3

Design Thinking is a way of approaching problems, a method used by designers for ideation and development that has a wide range of applications. _x000D_ The tools and methods in this course include a set of creative strategies and borrow from a variety of disciplines, including ethnography, computer science, psychology and organizational learning, all to drive innovation. This course is focused on the tools and strategies needed for reframing challenges in human-centric ways, encouraging the designer to focus on what’s most important for clients, users & customers. Students will engage in the design process, create prototypes, test ideas, plan and conduct effective design research, make and use storyboards to communicate design concepts. Instructor-led discussion, along with readings, written assignments, and team-projects.

 

How Things Work (CSE285)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to detailed explanations behind the theory, function, and operation of selected technologies, answering the question, How does that work? This is a course in the physical and technological innovations in everyday life employing a minimum of mathematics. It explores the principles of automobiles, propulsion, digital media, cellular technologies, cyber security, nuclear and solar power generation, computer systems, etc. In-class demonstrations will aid in demystifying many topics. Lectures will look inside products from our daily lives to see what scientific principles make them work, focusing on their principles of operation, histories and relationships to one another. Students will work individually, and additionally, present to the class as a group on an emerging technology. The course will be split into three themes: The Digital World, Power and Energy, and Daily Motion. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Start-up Culture (CSE290)

Credits:3

This course provides practical proven tools for transforming an idea into a product or service that creates value for people. As students acquire these tools, they will learn how to differentiate between good and bad ideas, how to build a winning strategy, how to shape a unique value proposition, design a business model, compare the innovation to existing solutions, build flexibility into a plan and determine when best to quit. This course guides students through the process of actively validating ideas in the market. Students are encouraged to identify and communicate good opportunities and to create and capture value from those. Students will receive feedback that systematically tests different parts of their business idea and develop confidence in pitching ideas to investors and customers. Instructor led discussions and lectures; assessment through projects, exams, assignments, and presentations.

 

Introduction to Product Design (CSE291)

Credits:3

An introduction to 3D design techniques and graphics communication tools necessary for a product design. Students learn 3D modeling, assembling, mechanism design, and simulation tools via Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) company’s online tutorials and demonstrations. Through number of lectures they learn also basic product design communication tools – drawing standards, units, projection views, dimensioning, sections, etc. The knowledge acquired during the course will help students transform their ideas to Computer-Aided Design 3D models and drawings. Also, they will be prepared to apply these powerful design tools in further more advanced courses and their work practice. The evaluation will be done through PTC Precision Learning portal self-assessment questions, home assignments and product design project.

 

Building a Learning Organization (CSE292)

Credits:3

This course will introduce the underlying principles that individuals, teams and organizations can acknowledge and implement in order to achieve continuous and sustainable development. The course will use Systems Thinking and analysis of cases studies from companies worldwide to provide an understanding of events that develop or destroy companies, markets, teams and individuals. By appreciating the underlying processes that can cause success or failure, students will be equipped with tools and methods to analyze interdependencies between people, their decisions and the corresponding consequences. Instructor led lecture and discussions; assessment may include problem sets, essays, exams, and projects.

 

Building a Learning Organization (CSE292)

Credits:3

 

 

Introduction to Economics (ECON101)

Credits:3

This course examines key concepts in both microeconomics and macroeconomics. The course explores individual consumer and industry behavior, supply and demand, market efficiency and equilibrium and the impact of government intervention. Students will also analyze the economy as a whole, especially issues related to output, unemployment, productivity, inflation, trade, and economic growth and development. Students will use these basic concepts to weigh different perspectives on monetary and fiscal policy and evaluate economic claims used in articles and newspapers, political campaigns, and debates. Home tasks will include reading assignments and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Not available to BAB students.

 

Introduction to Environmental Sciences (ENV101)

Credits:3

The course is designed for students to gain an understanding of basic principles of environmental sciences, including an introduction to the structure and functioning of ecosystems and their physical and [Delete: bio-chemical] [add: biogeochemical] cycles. The course will emphasize the importance of these processes for human health as well as human impact on these processes.

 

Fundamentals of Climate Change (ENV110)

Credits:3

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity today. The course will take a multidisciplinary approach to understanding its causes and consequences as well as responses to this challenge. The course will explore the science, economics, and politics of climate change. Key international and Armenia-specific literature, case studies, and social and political movements around climate change will be reviewed and discussed. The course will require students to participate in a simulated multi-stakeholder and multinational negotiations on addressing climate change.

 

Sustainable Food Systems (ENV120)

Credits:3

This course provides fundamental knowledge of food systems, including their economics and environmental sustainability aspects. This entails the description of primary agricultural resources and inputs, production technologies, post-harvest handling, and food waste, logistics, and marketing. Students will also learn developments in the food industry such as genetically modified organisms, organic agriculture, fair trade, and reduction of food loss. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Waste in Circular Economy (ENV140)

Credits:3

Producing waste seems an unavoidable result of human activity. But how can we minimize producing such waste? How can we extract value from what we do produce? The course will discuss the fundamental principles of sustainable waste management from] environmental, technological, social, and business viewpoints.The course will cover various types of waste, including food, packaging, plastics, paper, clothes, electronics, and more. The course will focus on the circular economy solutions discussing waste reduction strategies, green product design, reuse and recycling practices, zero-waste lifestyle, waste-to-energy, composting, biogas production, and more. Field visits to waste treatment facilities may be part of the course.

 

Basics of Sustainable Energy (ENV150)

Credits:3

The course focuses on sustainable generation and use of energy. Topics will include identifying, evaluating and managing sustainable energy use and generation in homes, buildings, industry, cities, and nationally. Specific topics shall include energy efficiency, lighting, centralized renewable energy generation, distributed renewable energy generation, smart grids, e-transportation, energy storage, as well as sustainable energy policies. Students will have an understanding of sustainable energy from the environmental, economic, and social perspectives. Students will be evaluated based on individual or group projects and written examinations. Instructor-led class time. Available to BS ES students as free elective.

 

Chemistry in Everyday Life (ENV170)

Credits:3

The course highlights and discusses the practical chemical world of human beings and the chemical nature of everyday processes. The role of chemistry in necessities of daily life such as the chemistry of life, agriculture, food, housing, healthcare, clothing, household goods (e.g., toys, furniture, etc.), transport and communications will be discussed. In addition the course will introduce various applications of chemistry in the area of arts, crime and law enforcement, consumer products, cosmetics and warfare. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including experimental design and chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and presentation of the final results. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

 

Environmental Monitoring (ENV203)

Credits:3

The course is to present general procedures, methods, theories, and techniques in the monitoring programs for different environments. Environmental contamination in air, water, soils, and food will be discussed with the emphasis on instrument selection and quality control, including documentation, calibration, and sample management. Classical monitoring schemes, as well as new and innovative techniques will be compared and evaluated. Local and regional data will be introduced and analyzed. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including planning and designing monitoring, sampling, biological and physical-chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and effective presentation of the final results. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, data-mining, presenting, written, and practical assignments. The course also includes lab and field work opportunities.

 

Water (ENV230)

Credits:3

Without adequate supply of freshwater our economies will not function and our health will not be secured. Human overuse and pollution of freshwater can also cause political conflict and damage ecosystems. This course will examine water from various perspectives including ecological, human health, resource stewardship, economic, and legal/political. Specific topics to be covered include water supply, use, and recycling in manufacturing, mining, energy, agriculture, and domestic life; potential for resource efficiency and optimization; water quality and types of water pollution, methods of testing and monitoring water quality and conditions of freshwater ecosystems; water purification and wastewater treatment; water planning and management tools/models including those for watersheds, surface, and ground water resources; new technologies, such as desalination, to access freshwater; and international and national laws on water. The course includes field and lab work opportunities.

 

Special Topics in Environment Sciences (ENV290)

Credits:3

The course covers a selected topic of current interest. Topics to be announced prior to course registration. _x000D_ Additional prerequisites may be required based on topic.

 

Translations: Digital Fabrication in Design (EPIC231)

Credits:3

The course aims to partake in the ongoing discourse about the role of fabrication for the production of design and manufacture. More specifically it aspires to draw a connection between the advancement of design ideas and the use of techniques specific to the digital fabrication pipeline, and to posit how this coupling may further inform other areas of disciplinary research. As such, the course aims to be a research laboratory for the analysis, development and localized deployment of strategies for digital fabrication. _x000D_ Topics of study include: design/fabrication typologies, technical performance, sustainable strategies, prefabrication methodology, current and future developments in design/fabrication, among others.

 

Freshman Seminar 1 (FND101)

Credits:3

This course aims to introduce students to the AUA’s core values—academic excellence, free inquiry, integrity, scholarship, leadership, and service —while building students’ communication skills. Students are challenged to translate these values into practice and reflect upon two interrelated themes: how might these values enrich their potential as lifelong learners and leaders, and how might these values help students collectively build a productive and democratic community. Throughout the semester students will sharpen their oral and written communication skills by engaging in class discussions and debates as well as by utilizing the various stages of the writing process to produce wellorganized paragraphs, letters, and short essays. Students will also have the opportunity to build an array of academic skills and familiarize themselves with university resources including the Papazian Library, Center for Academic Excellence, and Writing Lab through formal inclass trainings and home tasks. Three hours of instructorled discussion per week.

 

Freshman Seminar 2 (FND102)

Credits:3

Building upon the skills and concepts introduced in FND 101, this course aims to further develop students’ communication skills while exploring themes set forth in the AUA mission such as citizenship, leadership, community building, sustainable development, and service to society. Students will examine how authors construct arguments and communicate persuasively through analyzing a variety of texts of different periods and genres. Students will also advance their communication and teamwork skills through class discussions, collaborative projects, and writing assignments. The course includes weekly readings and assignments, a research-based group presentation, and a persuasive essay, in which students will investigate an important need in Armenia.

 

Armenian Language & Literature 1 (FND103)

Credits:3

This course exposes students to a variety of texts by Armenian and non-Armenian poets, playwrights, and novelists across various historical periods. Students will study the linguistic and literary values of these texts, gaining an understanding of how literature reflects and constructs the Armenian identity in social, cultural, political, and historical contexts. Students will gain an appreciation of the Armenian language and develop skills in literary analysis through close reading, writing, discussion and presentation. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week._x000D_ _x000D_ Note: Most sections will be offered in Armenian. Non Republic of Armenia citizens who did not graduate from an RoA high school whose language of instruction is Armenian will be eligible to enroll in an English-language section.

 

Armenian Language and Literature 2 (FND104)

Credits:3

This course involves close reading of influential works by Armenian writers in their historical, cultural and comparative context. The course examines the linguistic and cultural value of epic, short story, and spiritual literature through which students will gain an understanding of the interrelationship between literature and various aspects of Armenia’s history and development. Students are required to draw upon literary theories and influences in their final project and presentation, which may be either an original work or a sustained essay on an influential literary work. This course is designed for students with an Advanced to advanced background of the Armenian language. Although the course will be conducted in Eastern Armenian, it will expose students to literary works in both Western and Eastern Armenian. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

Physical Education (FND110)

Credits:0

The course is designed to provide experience in a physical activity in which the student is interested. The experience will include knowledge of the rules and values of the activity and the development of fundamental skills and strategies necessary for active participation. Students chose from a variety of options each term.

 

First Aid (FND152)

Credits:0

Under Armenian law, all university students are required to take 120 hours of Physical Education, and 40 hours of First Aid and Civil Defense training during their studies. At AUA, Physical Education is scheduled for the first two years, and First Aid and Civil Defense are scheduled during your first year only. (Course description pending final approval.)

 

Civil Defense (FND153)

Credits:0

Under Armenian law, all university students are required to take 120 hours of Physical Education, and 40 hours of First Aid and Civil Defense training during their studies. At AUA, Physical Education is scheduled for the first two years, and First Aid and Civil Defense are scheduled during your first year only. (Course description pending final approval.)

 

Armenian History 1 (FND221)

Credits:3

This course examines the history of Armenia, its land and people. The course will cover history from antiquity to the early modern age (beginning of the 16th century). The course examines the geopolitical, economic, religious and socio-cultural development of Armenia and explores the relationship between Armenia and other countries. Students will critically examine historical events, processes, actors, and models of history writing. Students will work individually and in groups to integrate evidence from various sources in order to develop a greater understanding of Armenian history. Instructor-led discussions. _x000D_ Note: Most sections will be offered in Armenian. Non Republic of Armenia citizens who did not graduate from an RoA high school whose language of instruction is Armenian will be eligible to enroll in an English-language section.

 

Armenian History 2 (FND222)

Credits:3

 

This course covers various episodes and aspects of the history of the Armenian people and their territories, beginning with King Arshak II (4th century CE) through the establishment of the modern Republic of Armenia and renewed independence in the 21th century.  The course explores the political, economic, and cultural trends within and beyond Armenia to understand Armenia’s development and identity in its global context.  Students will be required to conduct independent research using primary and secondary sources to analyze contemporary issues through a historical or comparative lens and to evaluate and synthesize evidence and arguments from various disciplines, effectively communicate their ideas to a broad audience, and present their findings utilizing appropriate software and technology. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to be forward-looking, to analyze Armenia’s unique history in order to anticipate challenges and opportunities for development.  Students will also be challenged to think of themselves as informed and responsible historical actors capable of positively influencing Armenia’s history. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week. _x000D_ (Most sections will be offered in English; however, some will also be available in Armenian for those able to work with Armenian-language sources). _x000D_ Note: Most sections will be offered in Armenian. Non Republic of Armenia citizens who did not graduate from an RoA high school whose language of instruction is Armenian will be eligible to enroll in an English-language section.

 

 

Law in Everyday Life (LAW101)

Credits:3

This course presents the basic principles of law as we experience it in everyday life. It aims to inform students about their rights, duties and the predictable interactions people have with the legal system, from law enforcement to taxes and family law. Students will learn how law is made, how it is applied in courts and by administrative bodies, how it regulates private relations and relations between the citizen and the state, through analysis and discussion about situations and cases from real life. Assessment will include tests, papers, and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Introduction to Armenian Justice System (LAW110)

Credits:3

This course explains the institutions and processes of the Armenian justice system as they affect the lives of citizens, businesses and government agencies, including general courts, specialized courts, criminal, civil and administrative processes. The course aims to equip students to understand their rights and remedies for violation of rights, as well as the role of various government bodies, courts, police, prosecutors, regulators, in the administration and establishment of justice in Armenian society. Instructor-led course will draw on case studies to examine a range of common situations students, citizens, and businesses face in everyday life.

 

Introduction to Human Rights (LAW142)

Credits:3

The Introduction to Human Rights course will introduce students to the key concepts, rules and debates in the theory and the practice of contemporary international human rights. In particular, the course focuses on the historical development and philosophical and political foundations of human rights. Students will also explore international and national mechanisms for the protection of human rights, e.g. UN treaty and charter mechanisms, European systems of human rights protection, national judiciaries, human rights institutions and civil society organizations. Students will examine selected human rights and freedoms in order to understand human rights in practice. At the end of the course students learn the national and international legal grounds for limitations and derogations from human rights. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

Law and Justice in Popular Culture (LAW160)

Credits:3

This course explores how legal concepts, role models, and professional ethos in popular culture promote and reinforce the rule of law. The course aims to explore how dedicated individuals using the skills and arts of persuasive and knowledge of the law can expand justice in their societies by the use of legal mechanisms. Through the medium of film and literature followed by class discussion, the following basic concepts are reviewed: social contract theory, professional ethics, rule of law (e.g. resort to courts and legal structures to resolve conflict as an alternative to violence), comparative review of legal systems (e.g. use of juries, class action mechanisms, etc.) and standard defendant rights (right against self‐incrimination, right to counsel), professional responsibility for attorneys and judicial ethics, and legal advocacy.

 

Armenian Constitution (LAW201)

Credits:3

The course aims to present the evolution, structure and content of the Armenian Constitution in historical and comparative perspective. The course will analyze the Armenian Constitution and its role in social, economic, and political life, including such topics as the separation of powers, the system of checks and balances, supremacy of the constitution, constitutional rights and values, and the roles, powers and responsibilities of various constitutionally defined government structures, including the President, the National Assembly, the Government, judiciary and local self-government bodies. Special emphasis will be placed on direct application of constitutional provisions, including the protection of fundamental civil and human rights. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

 

Legal Anthropology (LAW202)

Credits:3

This course aims at introducing and discussing issues on law-abiding and law-making behavior in its broader cultural context as an aspect of human society. Topics include development/establishment of norms, their relation to justice, cultural values, social structures, and institutions, and means of promotion of compliance in different societies through socialization, education, enforcement and punishment. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Public Advocacy (LAW262)

Credits:3

Increasingly lawyers, because of their insight into public policy, are called upon to use their skills to advocate in the court of public opinion and other fora beyond the formal courtroom and deliberative assembly. This course aims to equip students with models and skills to be effective public advocates. In addition to learning theoretical models and case studies, students will be called upon to design advocacy strategies and make written and oral presentations in simulations of public deliberation

 

Basics of Healthy Lifestyle (PH101)

Credits:3

The course provides an overview of concepts and issues related to mental, social, and physical dimensions of health with a focus on healthy behaviors and lifestyle. The course emphasizes preventive health practices which reduce risk factors associated with disease. The course enables students to analyze the relationship between healthy lifestyle and health and builds knowledge and skills to recognize and cope with health problems that they may face during their college years and later in life. Main topics include behavior change, mental health, stress and stress management, nutrition, addictions, physical exercise, and sexual behavior and STIs.

 

Global Health (PH201)

Credits:3

This multidisciplinary course is designed to explore global health and how it impacts all of us globally and locally. The course develops skillsets for interpreting, developing and using global health indicators and methods, and to explore the application of measures to improve the wellbeing of people globally and locally. The course will include an exploration of topics including leading causes of death, disease and disability, mental health, socioeconomic impacts on health, maternal and child health, media and health, disasters and war (including earthquakes and genocide), climatic change, gender equity and humanitarianism. The course will confer theory and practice for developing and measuring indicators of health and wellbeing. Students will be graded based on quizzes and exams, group projects with reallife problems, oral presentations and participation.

 

Causes, Treatment and Prevention of Cancer (PH202)

Credits:3

This course provides an overview of the biological basis of cancer, including the causes and progression of cancer, as well as the currently available treatment options. The course addresses the genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors’ contribution to cancer with the emphasis on changes occurring on molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Specific attention is paid to factors, including behavioral, social and environmental, important for prevention of cancer. This course also examines how the concept of cancer and understanding of its causes evolved throughout history based on important discoveries in the biomedical field. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to apply the knowledge of cancer biology in adopting appropriate lifestyle strategies.

 

Human Nutrition and Health (PH203)

Credits:3

Poor-quality diet is one of the leading causes of death and disease world-wide and in Armenia. The course will explore this phenomenon and ask students to think about how to improve nutrition for themselves, their families and their communities. Students will learn evidenced-based dietary guidelines, how to assess their diets, and explore the social and environmental determinants of eating behaviors.  They will also learn how health and agricultural policies can affect dietary behavior. Students will apply this knowledge in both individual and group assignments.

 

Introduction to Political Science (PSIA101)

Credits:3

This course provides students with an introduction to the approaches in the study of politics. The course explores major concepts prevalent in political science including power, democracy, political culture and constitutionalism. It identifies the major fields of study within the discipline and familiarizes students with the differences in approach that each follow from a comparative perspective. Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and to practice skills discussed in class.

 

Introduction to US Government (PSIA102)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the structures and functions of American government and politics. Students study the major institutions, how political parties interact with government, how elections are conducted and how policies are made. This is done within an historical context. American Federalism and the changes in how government attends to problems both foreign and domestic are covered. Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and to practice skills discussed in class.

 

Introduction to Armenian Government (PSIA103)

Credits:3

This course is a general introduction to the structure and functions of Armenian Government and its institutions, from historical, legal and comparative perspectives. The role of each branch of the government, the scope of its authority, and checks and balances in the system, will be examined in light of constitutional design and ongoing political processes, along with the relationship between the national, regional and local levels of government. Specific issues will include the state tax and budgeting process, fiscal accountability, lawmaking and regulation making, civic participation in the process, and mechanisms for public oversight of government activities and protection of individual rights as well as the military, law enforcement, and security agency’s special responsibilities and authority. The course aims to help students understand the role of government in the 21st century and the rights and responsibilities of 21st citizen in public and governmental affairs, in light of international best practices and Armenia’s development. Three hours of instructor-led instruction per week.

 

Political Philosophy (PSIA201)

Credits:3

This course examines some of the deepest questions about politics and society. Why should we have government and what would things be like without it? Is there a duty to obey government or are people sometimes justified in resisting it? What form should government take and in particular, is democracy the best form of government? How much freedom should people have and is society justified in restricting freedom? What form of property system should society have and should society try to redistribute income and wealth? We will also examine the contribution that feminism has made to social and political thought. The course is organized around five main topics: 1. State of Nature, 2. Political Obligation, 3. Forms of Government, 4. Freedom and Rights, 5. Property and Social Justice. Among the thinkers whose work will be covered are Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill. Course work will involve essays, research, presentations, and close reading of philosophic texts. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

 

International Relations (PSIA205)

Credits:3

This course aims to introduce students to a wide-range of concepts, tools and cases in the study of contemporary international relations. The course includes an overview of the essential history of the global system and introduces the foundational theories and alternative theories upon which much of the analyses of world politics is based, including game theory. The course explores how the international system, international law and diplomacy function in theory and practice. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Religion and Politics (PSIA271)

Credits:3

What is the relationship between religion and politics? This course examines the meanings of and interactions between, religion and politics in comparative politics and international relations. Contrary to theories about toward secularization recent developments underscore the important role religion continues to play in world politics. In many countries religious beliefs, practices and institutions shape individual values, social organizations, state institutions and international. The course will examine trends and theories on the of religion in public life, in state and global politics, including separation of church and state (i.e., state secularism); nationalism and religion; war and peace; non-discrimination, and gender issues. Issues of religion, church and state in Armenia will also be discussed in the context of global developments. Assessment will include tests, essays, and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Geopolitics of Asia (PSIA272)

Credits:3

The course serves as an introduction to the complex regional dynamics that make up the international relations of Asia, a region of growing political and economic importance. The course applies various analytical and theoretical approaches to understanding the complexities of the region, in its geographic, ethnic, religious and economic diversity. The course explores the role of great power hegemony and various regionalisms, and the role of Russia, China, India and the United States, and their interrelations and external relations with the region. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

 

Geopolitics of Europe (PSIA273)

Credits:3

The course explores Europe: its contributions, its torments, its communities, its races and ethnicities, its laws, its theories, its geo-political importance to the world; investigating its many roles as colonizer, imperialist, arbiter of theology and reason, scientist, artist, musician, author, philosopher, warrior, technologist, diversifier of migration, politician, democrat, nationalist, populist, institutionalist, protectionist. The course addresses such topics as the renaissance and reformation, enlightenment and absolutism; turmoil, power, capital, revolution, collectivism vs. individualism, division and recovery, modernizer and post-modernizer, nation-state proponent, cosmopolitanism, communitarianism. Forty-five hours of instructor-led class tie.

 

Development Policy (PSIA281)

Credits:3

This course is a survey of the literature on key determinants of development “Development” at the statelevel and “development” at the project level. We begin by considering some of the factors that drive state development, including economic growth, poverty reduction, social inequality, etc. We study different development models most popular in different periods of time, and then move on to the analysis of state policies in health and education, population and migration, and the linkages between investments in human capital and economic growth. The course then moves on to other key topics in international development including accountability and good governance, conditionalities, monitoring and evaluation of results, etc. The course concludes with a discussion on the scope and limitations of foreign aid and the institutions that implement aid policies. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

 

Survey of Regional Politics (PSIA282)

Credits:3

Survey of Regional Politics aims to provide insights into the existing and emerging dynamics of the Caucasian region. The course will identify and analyze features of political cultures, traditions of statehood and key domestic developments in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Iran, Georgia, as well as foreign policy priorities and interests of Russia, EU, USA. Special attention will be paid to Armenia’s relations with its neighbors and different geopolitical interests pursued by major global stakeholders. The course consists of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

 

Special Topics in Social Sciences (PSIA296)

Credits:3