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EC Courses

EC103 Introduction to Language and Culture (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of the structural, biological, and historical aspects of language and focuses on the socio-cultural aspect—the connections between language and culture, and the ways in which language is used in various cultural and social contexts.  Examples of regional variation, social variation, ethnicity, gender, age, style, register, and the status of the speaker’s language will be discussed and illustrated during the course. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC104 Introduction to Communications (Credits: 3)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of communication studies. Students will examine the components of human communication as it takes place within interpersonal, group, organizational, and public contexts and become familiar with the historical development of mass media and its role in society, looking at the print and electronic news media, advertising, public relations, and the Internet.  Students will also explore developments in the theory of communication from the mid20th century to the present.  They will apply theoretical models to critically assess contemporary means and patterns of communication and use these models to analyze and develop their own written and oral communication in different formats. Course work will include media and reading assignments, as well as case studies and oral and written projects.  Three hours of instructorled class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC105 Introduction to the Structure of English (Credits: 3)

This course is a systematic introduction to the structure of the English language. Students will acquire knowledge of the morphology, syntax, and phonology of contemporary English. They will explore the interrelation of form, meaning, and use and apply linguistic knowledge in the analysis of their own and others’ communication. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and home tasks in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC120 American Literature I (Credits: 3)

This survey course introduces students to American literature from the beginning of European contact to the present, focusing on major authors and different literary genres. It examines the historical influences on the evolution of this body of literature and the construction of a distinct and complex American identity. Through close reading, class discussion and their own research and writing, students will explore how themes such as gender, race, class, spirituality, economics, and the environment play a role in the formation and evolution of the American experience.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC121 English Literature I (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to English literature from the Elizabethan period through the twentieth century and focuses on the development of various literary genres, as well as on the works of the most significant literary figures. The class will cover the major literary movements from English Renaissance humanism to Postmodernity and may also include marginal literary voices and ephemeral literature from English letters to provide context and balance.    Students are required to write analytical essays and complete weekly reading assignments. Three hours of instructorled class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC125 Introduction to Acting Techniques (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the process of building a character and interacting on stage using movement, voice, and imagination. Throughout the course, students will explore techniques of improvisation and scene study, and develop the basic skills of the acting process. They will become familiar with the history and theory of the craft of acting, and apply relevant concepts and practices to critically analyze their own work and that of others. Coursework will include reading assignments, written critiques and reflections, and performance-based projects.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC130 Introduction to Journalism (Credits: 3)

This course examines the nature of journalism as an area of mass media, its history and role in creating public opinion and disseminating information, and the impact of technology on journalism today. Students will be introduced to the meaning of “news” definition, qualities of, evaluation and selection, and channels and audiences for news. The theoretical part of the course is paired with the actual practice of journalism: reporting (gathering information), exploring news values, news styles, form and organization of news stories, and writing various types of news: hard news, features, interviews, and critiques.  Students will be required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND101 AND FND102

 

EC140 Expository Writing (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to develop students’ writing skills for use in a wide array of academic and professional contexts.  Students will become familiar with the linguistic and rhetorical features of different genres of objective and informational writing, critically analyzing samples of effective writing in order to use them as models for their own work.  They will be encouraged to view writing as a process, involving planning, drafting, and revision for clarity and precision. Students are required to complete short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not necessarily limited to summaries, reports, memos, narratives, expository analyses, and syntheses. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, along with inclass and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND101 AND FND102

 

EC141 Persuasive Writing (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to develop students’ persuasive writing skills for use in a wide array of academic and professional contexts. Students will become familiar with the structural and   rhetorical features of formulating and communicating arguments in a persuasive manner, taking into consideration such factors as audience, reasoning, evidence, and style. They will be encouraged to view writing as a process, involving planning, drafting, and revision for clarity and precision. Students are required to complete short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not limited to persuasive essays, letters, reviews, and proposals.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND101 AND FND102

 

EC151 Consecutive and Simultaneous Interpreting (Credits: 3)

This course introduces the theory, research, and practice of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting.  It focuses on the practical techniques and skills of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting from English into Armenian and from Armenian into English within a variety of professional areas and for a range of purposes. The course also aims at furthering students’ command of both Armenian and English through interpreting exercises and thematic glossaries. Students are expected to complete weekly readings and other home assignments and be prepared for in-class discussions, tasks, and interpretation practice. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102 AND FND104

 

EC200 Introduction to Discourse Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the study of discourse through hands-on analysis of real language in use, taking into account the linguistic features and functions of spoken, written, and multi-modal communication as well as the social, cultural, and political contexts in which it occurs. We will explore how meaning is created and relationships are enacted within and across an array of genres and use this knowledge to interpret and construct texts within different social and professional contexts. Course work will include reading assignments, written analyses, and practical application. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC105 OR EC103

 

EC215 Acting Techniques II (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the process of characterization and interaction practicing them in different styles. Throughout the course, students will explore techniques of improvisation and interpretation of a scene. Through exploration of theatre approaches, they will apply the concepts and practices to do a theoretical and practical interpretation of their own work developing skills of the acting process Coursework will include reading assignments, written interpretation, and performance-based projects. Acting for film is part of the syllabus and includes monologues shot on the phone. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102 AND EC125

 

EC222 World Literature 2 (Credits: 3)

This world literature course is designed to engage students in critical analysis of significant literary texts from around the world. The aim is to explore perspectives on society and culture through the study of writers from diverse backgrounds working in various literary genres. Possible themes may include transnationalism, moral ambiguities across cultures, the transition from colonial to postcolonial, or the nature of translation.    Through discussions and written assignments, students will improve their critical thinking, analytical writing, and oral communication skills. All texts will be read in English translation.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC120 OR EC121

 

EC225 Short Fiction (Credits: 3)

This course explores short fiction from major world literary figures, further developing students’ knowledge of and ability to read and analyze literature.  Students will engage in close reading of the texts and consider form and content in relation to the historical context and the relevant literary and philosophical movement(s) of the time,  addressing issues such as tradition, modernity, conflict, war, injustice and freedom.  The course aims to deepen students’ skills in interpreting texts with awareness of the texts’ basic orientation in the world (historical, philosophical, religious, linguistic, etc.); constructing arguments and evaluating canons using appropriate evidence and tools of critical analysis; and developing an appreciation of the fundamental ambiguities and complexities involved in all human attempts to answer questions about life. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC121 OR EC120

 

EC226 Speculative Fiction: Science Fiction, Fantasy and the Fantastic (Credits: 3)

This course explores the genre of speculative fiction, which encompasses science fiction, fantasy fiction, and the fantastic (or horror), and spans counter-culture and mainstream works from ancient Greece to the present day.  Through close reading and interdisciplinary analysis students will develop an in-depth understanding of the genre and the issues—science and technology, the supernatural, human nature, and human consciousness, among others—that it aims to address.   Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC120 OR EC121

 

EC227 Modern Poetry (Credits: 3)

The unprecedented devastation and upheaval the world witnessed between 1890 and 1960 prompted Western writers to question accepted cultural, literary and artistic norms and to produce radically experimental works of art and new understandings of what it means to live in modern times. Modernist poetry arose during this time, profoundly reflecting the changes that continue to shape our lives to this day. In this course, students will engage with the work of various modern poets while also gaining a theoretical understanding of poetics and twentieth-century literature. They will develop skills in analysis, creativity, critical thinking, and communication. Instructor-led discussion, along with in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC120 AND EC121

 

EC228 Children’s Literature (Credits: 3)

Children’s literature plays an important role in the transmission of cultural values from one generation to the next. In this course, students will critically analyze a range of children’s literature and also create a work of their own.  Students will read folk and fairy tales from different cultures and a variety of children’s books, and analyze selected pieces based on psychological and social studies of childhood and the influence of literature on the development of children.  Students will engage in research on some aspect of child development vis-à-vis exposure to fairy tales, folk tales, or books, and produce a complete (text and pictures) book for children. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC121 OR EC120

 

EC229 The Graphic Novel (Credits: 3)

This course combines cultural and political approaches to investigate one of the most influential and rapidly growing forms of literature: comics. Popular, yet historically considered lowbrow, graphic novels are now critically recognized as an important form in the creative arts. This course reflects an interdisciplinary approach to knowledge, combining visual arts, journalism, fiction and memoire. Students will develop the critical skills necessary to read, understand, write and produce graphic narratives. They will explore works that define the genre while illustrating a variety of artistic and storytelling approaches to contemporary cultural and political themes, and selections from comic history and graphic narrative theory. Instructor led lectures and discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC121 OR EC120

 

EC231 Public Speaking (Credits: 3)

This course aims to develop students’ speaking skills for a variety of public and professional situations.  Students will explore fundamental principles and practice of public oratory with an emphasis on all phases of communication: conception, design, organization, research, writing, rehearsal, and delivery.  Students will gain skills and confidence in conveying and modulating message and meaning in different registers through formal and extemporaneous public speeches, expository/informative and persuasive presentations for public meetings and conferences, and other speaking tasks. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, plus in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102

 

EC232 Public Relations (Credits: 3)

This course explores the role of the public relations practitioner as a specialist in both internal and external communication, an analyst of public opinion, and a counselor to administrators and corporate leaders. It examines the theories and practices of public relations and provides students with opportunities to implement their skills and knowledge in authentic tasks, including developing a public relation plan, designing activities and events aimed at managing an organization’s reputation, and working with the media.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and in-class and home tasks to acquire knowledge of the topics covered in class. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC233 Professional Communication (Credits: 3)

Effective written and spoken communication is a core competency for professional and public life.   This course is designed to give students a comprehensive view of the scope and importance of professional communication in a variety of settings.  It aims to develop students’ writing, speaking, and interpersonal skills and specific tools for communicating in complex environments and accomplishing strategic academic and professional goals.  Students will refine communication skills necessary for internships and permanent workplace positions.  More specifically, students will gain skills in writing letters, emails, resumes, proposals, formal and informal reports, agendas, and work plans with an awareness of succinct written expression necessary for professional communication.  Students will develop informative, persuasive, and extemporaneous oral skills for networking, telephone, Internet-based and face-to-face interviews, and presentations.  Because effective group communication is a necessity in today’s workplace, students will learn and practice skills in managing meetings, dealing with conflict, and leveraging the power of diversity, at both the individual and cultural level.  Students are required to complete weekly assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the topics discussed in class.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, plus in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC141 OR EC140

 

EC234 Advertising (Credits: 3)

Advertising and marketing communications are a pervasive presence in modern life and an essential skill for communications professionals.   This course explores the principles and practices of advertising and its role within marketing communications.  Students will develop a critical understanding of how advertising functions in global and local contexts and become familiar with the components of the advertising process, including market research, media planning, and creative strategies. They will learn how to identify the target audience, determine which medium or combinations of media provide the best means to reach it, and create effective messages.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and in-class and home tasks to acquire the knowledge of the topics covered in class. Three-hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC235 Communications Ethics (Credits: 3)

In a continuously connected world, communication has taken on a pervasive role in our lives, raising a new range of ethical issues for communications professionals and non-professionals alike.  This course examines ethical and legal aspects of human communication as it takes place within interpersonal and public contexts. Students will be introduced to basic theories of ethics and then guided through current controversies relating to such topics as privacy, freedom of speech, censorship, the right to be informed, and propaganda.  They will explore theoretical ethical issues connected with the acquisition, storing and sharing of information and become familiar with relevant Armenian legal codes.  Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC236 Survey/Polling Methodology (Credits: 3)

Decision making in the fields of mass communication, marketing, and public relations relies on the ability to conduct research and critically interpret data. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of survey research, thus advancing their understanding and skills in social science research methodologies. Students will learn how to understand and critically analyze data and results from survey research and public opinion polls. They will also learn how to collect, analyze and interpret original survey data. Students will be required to complete weekly reading assignments to acquire knowledge and practice skills covered in class. They will also conduct individual or group projects including fieldwork, written assignments, and oral presentations. Three hours of instructor-led discussions/class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC237 Introduction to Filmmaking (Credits: 3)

Film is the medium of our age, combining audio, visual, symbolic and narrative elements to produce impactful messages.   This course is designed to empower students with the ability to express themselves and communicate effectively in the medium of film, providing them with an understanding of how and why films are made. Students will learn the core principles and techniques of filmmaking, both in theory and practice. The course will combine discussions on the history, language, forms and functions of film with hands-on technical instruction in developing projects from start to finish (planning, shooting, editing). Students will collaborate in teams to create short films focusing on specific skills and concepts. They will complete written assignments, and view and critique a selection of films and each other’s work in class.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC238 Media & Society (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon Introduction to Communications (EC104) and explores historical and contemporary issues in the interaction between media and society. Students will examine and develop critical perspectives on mediaBREAKand the interplay between media institutions, media content, and culture. The course will introduce major theories used in analyzing media and its effects, as well as examine the characteristics of individual media: newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, film, the Internet, and social media. The core concepts of media ethics will also be discussed. Course work will include media and reading assignments, as well as collaborative media projects. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC104

 

EC239 Campaigning for a Cause (Credits: 3)

Campaigning is an increasingly widespread form of public relations and communications in the networked age applicable well beyond the political sphere.  This course is designed to guide students through the entire chain of a successful campaign in a range of sphere, including but not limited to polishing the idea (clear understanding of the cause and its importance), strategizing and planning (a step-by-step roadmap towards achieving the goal), targeting the right audience, and developing the message through analysis and research. The course will incorporate elements of communication, fundraising, and grassroots advocacy, including the use of crowd-funding and social media.  Students will explore the basic principles of successful campaigns, analyze case studies of local and international campaigns, and develop the practical skills necessary to plan and conduct successful campaigns. Students will be required to complete weekly readings and other home assignments and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC240 Creative Writing (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to develop students’ writing skills by exploring various creative genres (poetry, fiction, playwriting, nonfiction, memoir, etc). Students will become familiar with literary forms, styles, and traditions, critically analyzing samples in order to improve their own work. The core of this course is based on original student writing, therefore students will be required to submit short work on a weekly basis, depending on the genre and focus. They will be encouraged to view writing as a creative process, involving honest exploration of ideas and the imagination. They will practice free-writing, drafting, and revision for clarity, precision, and literary effect. Students will also be required to actively participate during each class, discussing assigned texts and other students’ writings. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, along with in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 OR EC141

 

EC242 Technical Writing (Credits: 3)

This advanced writing course is aimed at building the skills needed to produce clear and effective technical and scientific writing in areas that may include but are not limited to computer science, earth science, engineering, business, finance, and medicine. Students will learn how to follow conventions of technical writing for whichever purpose they write, such as proposals, manuals, scientific reports, and technical documents. Regular assignments include readings, analyzing and critiquing sample papers, collecting and researching information and data, drafting, self- and peer revision. Students are required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class and integrate them into their own writing. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 AND EC141

 

EC243 The Practice & Art of Non-Fiction (Credits: 3)

Non-fiction is a diverse genre of writing that is in high demand in almost all spheres.   This writing skills course aims to familiarize students with various forms of non-fiction (memoir, feature writing, grant proposals, in-depth reviews, photo-essays, blogging, essays on art or culture, journalism, etc.). Texts will be read closely and analyzed in order to gain a wide breadth of knowledge about craft and style. Students will be encouraged to view writing as an analytical, ethical and creative process, involving the exploration of ideas, information, and facts. They will write in class, produce longer essays, and also conduct outside research. Students will practice free-writing and drafting, followed by revising for clarity, precision, and effect. They will also be required to actively participate during each class, discussing assigned texts and other students’ writing. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, along with in-class and take home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 OR EC141

 

EC244 Writing for Media (Credits: 3)

Working in media today demands flexibility, creativity, and critical awareness of the art and practice of writing in an ever-changing media environment. This course builds upon students’ basic writing skills by developing the skills used in writing for different media, with an emphasis on reporting, public relations, advertising, and professional communication. Students will explore theory and practice in writing for print, television, radio, and the internet, including traditional websites as well as blogs, social media, and other new media. They will analyze content, style, format, and other features of writing, and apply their understandings to their own written production. Students are required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments in order to acquire knowledge of the concepts discussed in class and integrate them into their own writing. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 AND EC141

 

EC245 Writing for Tourism, Culture and Country Promotion (Credits: 3)

This advanced writing course aims to bring genre, style and content into focus.  The ability to produce tailored texts and messages for special purposes, audiences and fields is one of the most highly sought skill sets in the field of communication.   It takes a combination of content knowledge, linguistic facility, audience sensitivity, and institutional knowledge.   Students will learn how to analyze specialized discourse in order to develop their own skills for specific fields, including tools and resources, preparation and authentication of terms of art.   Themes may include touristic writing and economic, political and cultural fields.   Course content themes will vary from term to term and be tailored to instructor and student interest.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC141 AND EC140

 

EC246 Business Journalism (Credits: 3)

Business writing is a branch of journalism that explains and analyzes the financial and business activities in an economy.  In this course, students will write about global and local firms in a number of sectors, including the technology, alternative energy, manufacturing, and service sectors that shape a country’s economy.  Students will explore various research, interviewing, and data collection strategies, and learn to weigh and evaluate evidence in financial reports and synthesize existing scholarship and data to write articles about the economy and its firms in creative and cogent ways, situating business issues in their broader context. They will also read and critique business articles from leading financial publications. Instructor-led discussions with reading and writing assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 or BUS177

 

EC250 Introduction to Translation (Credits: 3)

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the field of translation and the basic skills necessary to begin translating texts from English to Armenian and Armenian to English. Students will become familiar with the major practical and theoretical approaches and methods to translation. They will be encouraged to view translation as a process, involving planning, drafting, and revision for clarity and precision. Students are required to complete short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not limited to response papers, vocabulary journals, and translations from a range of texts from various disciplines. Three hours of instructor-led discussions per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC140 AND EC141

 

EC253 Literary Translation (Credits: 3)

This course familiarizes students with the history, theory and practice of literary translation. Students are encouraged to view translation as a creative process similar to that of creative writing. The aim of the course is to help students cultivate general translation techniques while focusing specifically on stylistic and semantic creativity in a workshop setting. Assignments include short readings and weekly writing assignments, which may include but are not limited to response papers, vocabulary journals, and translations from a range of texts from different literary genres. Knowledge of Armenian is required. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including lecture, seminar, workshop discussions.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND104 AND EC250 OR EC240

 

EC260 Negotiation (Credits: 3)

Almost every interaction of daily life involves some kind of negotiation process, thus negotiation is broadly conceived to be a form of communicative activity encompassing business, professional and personal life.     This course aims to develop students’ negotiation and persuasion skills by introducing them to new paradigms for collaborative problem solving,  starting with when and why people negotiate  After presenting different styles and models of negotiation, the course considers the effectiveness of each and teaches   tools and frameworks to better prepare for negotiation; e.g., an understanding of the different elements at play, awareness of trust and relationship-building dynamics, modes of persuasion, active listening skills, and strategic thinking and analysis skills.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week, plus in-class and take-home assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite:

 

EC261 World Media (Credits: 3)

This interdisciplinary course explores how media have transcended national boundaries and created new cultural spaces with their own rules, perspectives and values.   It looks at how world media, including news and entertainment, have created and serve global audiences and are  being used to promote economic and geopolitical goals.   Special attention will be paid to how world media contribute to a country’s soft power and the kinds of media that have been employed, with commercial success, as vehicles for country branding and promotion.   Topics will include the role of digital communities and diasporas in these multipronged media initiatives, as well as the blurring of the lines between viewers and consumers, artists and producers, information and entertainment, news and advertising, politics and popular culture.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Student performance will be assessed through individual and/or group written and oral presentations, case studies and/or essays.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102 AND EC103 OR EC104 OR EC125 OR EC130 OR EC222 OR EC234 OR EC237 OR EC238 OR LAW160 OR CHSS151 OR CHSS152 OR CHSS153 OR CHSS155 OR CHSS156 OR CHSS192 OR CHSS190 OR CHSS140 OR CHSS141 OR CHSS181 OR CHSS240 OR CHSS251 OR PSIA281 OR CHSS290

 

EC262 Filmmaking 2 (Credits: 3)

Students will build upon the visual storytelling techniques they learned in Introduction to Filmmaking. In addition to further exploration of cinematic grammar, narrative structure, theory and history, they will study the art of the documentary and the specific techniques and approaches to applying their storytelling skills to a non-fiction format. During the course students will conceive and complete a long-form fiction or documentary project. Students will develop their ideas from treatment to screenplay and then work collaboratively in crews to realize their projects, expanding their knowledge and experience in every phase of production. Each student will be required to critique and explain their own and each other’s work in classroom discussions and written assignments.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC237

 

EC263 Opinion Making in the Age of New Media (Credits: 3)

This course examines the nature of modern journalism as a practical tool for influencing and shaping public opinion. Moving beyond traditional journalism, it will explore such genres as talk shows, political satire, multimedia journalism, and social media, examining cases from both Armenian and world media to develop an understanding of how various media mechanisms function and how they can be effectively employed. Students will explore case studies and specific examples from Armenia and abroad to analyze how public discourse can be shaped, shifted, and focused on issues of importance, with attention to how political satire is used to influence public opinion and conduct of public officials.  They will learn to detect bias in media and attempts to manipulate public opinion and explore new tools to identify impact, ranging from statistical methods to psychological and physiological/brain activity monitoring. Throughout the course, students will undertake public relations and journalism projects, applying the methods and tools they have learned.   They will be required to complete weekly reading and writing assignments, case studies, and media projects.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238 AND EC130

 

EC264 Public Relations Campaigns (Credits: 3)

In this skills-based course students explore the strategic management of public relations through analyzing and developing campaigns and projects. They will create strategic proposals and tailor their writing for various purposes and text-types, developing practical, analytical, and creative skills needed for careers in PR.   Students will have the opportunity to build a professional portfolio and take part in other professional activities. They may also have the opportunity of job shadowing and site visit opportunities, to observe and collect information from professionals on the job. Besides the instruction led meetings there will be job shadowing and site visit opportunities for the students to observe and collect information from professionals on the job. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC265 The Language of Film (Credits: 3)

Cinema has evolved a complex system of conventions to tell stories and communicate ideas. This revolutionary and unique system of recording and assembling images and sound has been compared to language, involving a kind of cinematic “grammar”. In this course, students will learn to study cinema from a critical perspective. They will view a broad selection of films from a variety of genres to explore how motion pictures are designed to express meaning, and to analyze and relate their content and form. Students will complete written assignments as well as readings on filmmaking, film history, theory, and criticism.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC268 Photography (Credits: 3)

Photography is a fundamental element of today’s digital media. This course introduces the practical techniques and aesthetic principles of still photography and explores different genres of photography and their uses. The course aims to develop an understanding of such aspects of photography as depth of field, composition, motion blur, and visual storytelling through both critical analysis and hands-on shooting and editing exercises. The course will also include such topics as the history of photography and the role it plays in the changing media landscape.  Instructor-led discussion and workshops, with reading, writing, and photographic assignments.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC238

 

EC269 Visual Communication (Credits: 3)

This course explores the principles of visual communication and the fundamental rules that govern our interaction with information in forms that can be read or seen. It provides students with theoretical and practical skills for working with various forms of visual presentation, affording them the ability to relate the concepts of design to the physical world (buildings, art, landscapes, etc.), to the world of ideas (how design influences our thinking and thought processes), and to the world of imagination (how we think of design, and how to apply this creatively). The course will also address such topics as the history of visual communications, the development of writing systems, artistic movements, typography, calligraphy, and poster design. Students will apply course concepts in written analyses and graphic design projects.  Instructor led discussion.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC104

 

EC270 Media and Politics (Credits: 3)

This course examines the complex relations between media and political systems, exploring the role of the media in politics and its links with political institutions, processes and actors. Students will apply theoretical understandings in the critical analysis of political communication, journalism, and new media, as they study both global trends and local realities.  Instructor-led lectures and discussions, with coursework including theoretical analysis, case studies, and practical application.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC104

 

EC280 Oral History: Collecting Life Stories (Credits: 3)

“Memory is living history, the remembered past that exists in the present” (Frisch, 1990, p. xxiii). BREAKMemory work, through the medium of oral history, offers the opportunity to examine the connections between public and personal history, marginalized lives and silences. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of oral history, critically examining ethical considerations, memory work, oral evidence, interpretive conflict, and “sharing authority” in researcher and participant relationships. Leading students to complete oral history projects of their own, various forms of outputs will also be discussed including life story narratives, archival documentation, co-narrating with participants, public pedagogy, advocacy, and research creation projects. Alongside instructor-led lectures students will engage in close readings, presentations, critical reflection, group discussions, and collaborative team work in preparation for oral history fieldwork.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC103 AND EC104

 

EC290 Research Methods (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to research methods in the fields of English language and literature, linguistics, writing and translation, and communications and media studies and prepares them for their capstone project in the subsequent term. Students will refine their skills of library research as they identify and formulate research questions. They will learn how to apply qualitative, quantitative, and hybrid methods of investigation to seek answers to their research questions. They will also explore the ways in which data collection and analysis connect to project planning and implementation. Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and practice skills discussed in class. They will then employ what they have learned in the development of a capstone proposal.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions and tasks.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC103 AND EC104 AND EC105 AND EC120 AND EC121 AND EC130 AND EC140 AND EC141 AND EC200 AND EC238

 

EC295 Special Topics (Credits: 3)

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: FND102

 

EC299 Capstone (Credits: 3)

The capstone provides students with the opportunity to investigate an area of academic and professional interest while building upon the knowledge and skills they have acquired through their English & Communication coursework.  As the culminating experience for the BA in English & Communications degree, the capstone course is designed to be highly individualized.   The topics and format are proposed by the student subject to approval of a capstone adviser with expertise in the field.  Topics should be well aligned with the student’s background and interests.  Formats include academic research paper, a creative or practical project, or suitable internship, plus a portfolio of written work.   The course combines instructor-led class meetings, class discussions, presentations and individual consultations with advisers.

Corequisite:

Prerequisite: EC290